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string strName = "John";
public enum Name { John,Peter }

private void DoSomething(string myname)
{
case1:
     if(myname.Equals(Name.John) //returns false
     {

     }

case2:
     if(myname == Name.John) //compilation error
     {

     }

case3:
     if(myname.Equals(Name.John.ToString()) //returns true (correct comparision)
     {

     }
}

when I use .Equals it is reference compare and when I use == it means value compare.

Is there a better code instead of converting the enum value to ToString() for comparison? because it destroys the purpose of value type enum and also, ToString() on enum is deprecated??

share|improve this question
2  
How come you are comparing strings to enum values? Is there a way to avoid that completely? – dlev Jul 16 '12 at 16:51
    
Trying to compare an enumeration to a string is a BAD idea. – Ramhound Jul 16 '12 at 17:45

You can use the Enum.TryParse() method to convert a string to the equivalent enumerated value (assuming it exists):

Name myName;
if (Enum.TryParse(nameString, out myName))
{
    switch (myName) { case John: ... }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is far better than comparing the ToString() value of each of the enumerations. :) – m-y Jul 16 '12 at 16:55

You can parse the string value and do enum comparisons.

Enum.TryParse: See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd783499.aspx

Name result;
if (Enum.TryParse(typeof(Name), myname, out result))
{
    switch (result)
    {
        case Name.John:
            /* do 'John' logic */
            break;
        default:
            /* unexpected/unspecialized enum value, do general logic */
            break;
    }
}
else 
{
    /* invalid enum value, handle */
}

If you are just comparing a single value:

Name result;
if (Enum.TryParse(typeof(Name), myname, out result) && result == Name.John)
{
     /* do 'John' logic */
}
else 
{
    /* do non-'John' logic */
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Downvoter. Why the downvote? – Paul Fleming Dec 16 '14 at 17:41
    
It was a mistake and now i cant redo it until you edit the answer. Sorry. – Kenci Dec 19 '14 at 19:57
2  
@Kenci. Ah ok. I've made an edit. :) – Paul Fleming Jan 7 '15 at 15:01

If you using .NET4 or later you can use Enum.TryParse. and Enum.Parse is available for .NET2 and later

// .NET2 and later
try
{
    switch (Enum.Parse(typeof(Names), myName))
    {
        case John: ... 
        case Peter: ...
    }
}

// .NET4 and later
Name name;
if (Enum.TryParse(myName, out name))
    switch (name)
    {
        case John: ... 
        case Peter: ...
    }
share|improve this answer

I think you're looking for the Enum.Parse() method.

if(myname.Equals(Enum.Parse(Name.John)) //returns false
 {

 }
share|improve this answer

One solution could be to get the type of the enum, and then the types name.

myname.Equals(Enum.GetName(typeof(Name)))

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.enum.getname.aspx

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