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I have a large series of functions that all look very similar: they take the same arguement type and return strings.

std::string f1(T arg);
std::string f2(T arg);
std::string f3(T arg);
std::string f4(T arg);
.
.
.

In a loop, they are used according to one of the variables inside the struct T. Currently to do this, I just have a large switch/case block in my code.

Is there any better coding style for doing this? The large block of code looks very weird.

I wish c++ could be like python and do eval("f" + str(i) + "(arg))"

The block is something like this:

std::string out = "";

switch (arg.tag){
    case 1:
        out += f1(arg);
        break;
    case 2:
        out += f2(arg);
        break;
    .
    .
    .
}

for about 2 dozen cases

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4  
If you want to use python, why not use python? –  Carl Norum Jul 16 '12 at 16:59
1  
The whole code is in c++, and it is enormous –  calccrypto Jul 16 '12 at 17:00
3  
Could you post a part of the "large switch/case block"? –  SingerOfTheFall Jul 16 '12 at 17:00
4  
Maybe use an array of function pointers? –  Eitan T Jul 16 '12 at 17:00
2  
You might also wish for a better design in C++ in the first place... having a set of functions named 'f#' and then dispatching to the #-th function based on the value of a variable does not smell too well... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 16 '12 at 17:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

With C++11 you can do this fairly easily with std::function and a map:

#include <map>
#include <functional>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>

std::string f1(int) { return "f1"; }
std::string f2(int) { return "f2"; }

std::map<int, std::function<std::string(int)> > funcs = {
  {1,f1},
  {2,f2}
};

int main() {
  std::cout << funcs[1](100) << "\n";    
}

Without C++11 you'll want to either use Boost instead of std::function or roll your own type instead. You could use plain old function pointers but that would rule out some handy things (like std::bind/boost::bind, functor objects, lambda functions. You could also define a type hierarchy with an interface that your functions implement for example the following works in C++03 except for the way the map is initialised:

#include <map>
#include <functional>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>

std::string f1(int) { return "f1"; }
std::string f2(int) { return "f2"; }

std::map<int, std::string(*)(int)> funcs = {
  std::make_pair(1,f1),
  std::make_pair(2,f2)
};

int main() {
  std::cout << funcs[1](100) << "\n";    
}

or this which lets you write any kind of functor object you like:

#include <map>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>

struct thing {
  virtual std::string operator()(int) const = 0;
};

struct f1 : thing {
  std::string operator()(int) const { return "f1"; }
};

struct f2 : thing {
  std::string operator()(int) const { return "f2"; }
};

// Note the leak - these never get deleted:
std::map<int, thing*> funcs = {
  std::make_pair(1,new f1),
  std::make_pair(2,new f2)
};

int main() {
  std::cout << (*funcs[1])(100) << "\n";
}
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2  
Without C++11 you can use plain function pointers, which is what std::function will use under the covers in this particular case. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 16 '12 at 17:07
1  
If all functions are actual functions (not functors) and have the same arguments/returntype (which the question seems to indicate), the solution for the non C++11/boost case (btw: wasn't there a std::tr1::function for c++03?) would be to use a function pointer (std::string(*)(int) iirc). This has the additional benefit of avoiding the overhead of using std::function (although that is likely negligible when using std::function to capture plain functionpointers). –  Grizzly Jul 16 '12 at 17:08
    
Added more examples of simpler solutions –  Flexo Jul 16 '12 at 17:16
3  
If C++11, you don't need std::make_pair. The initializer for funcs can be merely { {1,f1}, {2,f2} }; –  Robᵩ Jul 16 '12 at 17:31
    
@Robᵩ good thinking. Habit was blinding me on that one. –  Flexo Jul 16 '12 at 17:57

One way to emulate the Eval() is to have a map. The key of the map would be the names of the functions, and the values would be the pointers to the corresponding functions.

In this case you will be able to call the functions needed with the map's operator[] by their name. This will somehow emulate the eval("f" + str(i) + "(arg))" behavior, though it may still not be the best solution for you.

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