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Why can't I directly pass custom event arguments into a method subscribing to my event even though my custom event args class directly inherits from EventArgs?

For example, consider the two below classes. One is the class I want to work with, the other inherits from EventArgs, and contains some additional information related to the event:

using System;

namespace ConsoleApplication11
{
    class MyClass
    {
        public event EventHandler MyEvent;

        public void MyMethod(int myNumber)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(myNumber);

            if(myNumber == 7)
            {
                MyEvent.Invoke(null, new MyCustomEvent() { Foo = "Bar" });
            }
        }
    }

    class MyCustomEvent : EventArgs
    {
        public string Foo { get; set; }
    }
}

So if a number 7 is passed into MyMethod, I want to invoke MyEvent passing in the a new instance of the MyCustomEvent class to any method subscribing to my event.

I subscribe to this from my main program like so:

using System;

namespace ConsoleApplication11
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            MyClass myClass = new MyClass();
            myClass.MyEvent += new EventHandler(myClass_MyEvent);

            for (int i = 0; i < 9; i++)
            {
                myClass.MyMethod(i);
            }
        }

        static void myClass_MyEvent(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            //Do Stuff
        }
    }
}

Even though I am passing in a MyCustomEvent object when invoking the event, if I change the second parameter in the method subscribing to my event to a MyCustomEvent object I get a compile error. I need to instead explicitly cast the EventArgs object to a MyCustomEvent before I can access any additional fields/methods etc inside the class.

When working with an object that has a lot of different events, each one having a unique related custom EventArgs class, keeping track of what the EventArgs in each method subscribing to each event needs to be casted to can get a bit messy.

It would be a lot easier if I could pass my custom EventArgs class directly into the methods subscribing to my event.

Is this a possibility?

Thanks

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Instead of declaring your event as being of type EventHandler, create a new delegate that specifically uses your custom event args class:

public delegate void MyEventHandler(object sender, MyEventArgs args);
public event MyEventHandler MyEvent;

Now you can pass the arguments directly without casting.

The other option is to use the generic EventHandler<T>:

public event EventHandler<MyEventArgs> MyEvent;

I prefer the former, since you can then give the delegate type a more descriptive name, though the latter is a bit quicker.

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Declare your event using generic version of EventHandler:

public event EventHandler<MyCustomEvent> MyEvent;
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Rather than use a default event handler just define your own that fits the signature you are trying to achieve...

public delegate void MyEventHandler(object sender, MyCustomEventArgs e)
public event MyEventHandler MyEvent;
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forgive me if i understood your question wrong. I'm a little confused by not seeing any custom EventArgs class.

You can't make a method signature like

static void myClass_MyEvent(object sender, CustomEventArgs e)

for an event that expects a

static void myClass_MyEvent(object sender, EventArgs e)

That is backwards polymorphism, and polymorphism doesn't work backwards.

let's say your event accesses a e.OnlyInCustomEventArgs, but is instead passed the base object, EventArgs. Then the contract has been broken.

Now what you can do is

static void myClass_MyEvent(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    CustomEventArgs cea = (CustomEventArgs)e;
}
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