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I'm starting to make an SDL version of Conway's Game of Life. I've used SDL before, but never directly accessing the pixels. I wrote the following code, and it's performing pretty slowly. I've tried using UpdateRect instead of Flip, and there was no difference between the two. I initialized SDL with SWSURFACE. Is there anything I can do to improve it? I have workarounds in mind (using bmp for larger pixels, etc). The plot array is 640x480 of Cell objects, which simply contain a member 'alive' that can be accessed through getter/setters. All I want to do is to allow the mouse to efficiently draw pixels. Do I need to use OpenGL to do this? I want to clarify that I realize that modern hardware is not meant for per-pixel access. But seeing as that is what I need, I'm looking for a solution.

while (quit == false)
    {
            int pX = 0;
            int pY = 0;
            bool did_set = false;
            if (SDL_PollEvent(&event))
            {
                    switch(event.type)
                    {
                            case SDL_MOUSEBUTTONDOWN:
                                    plot[event.button.y][event.button.x].setAlive(true);
                                    pX = event.button.x;
                                    pY = event.button.y;
                                    did_set = true;
                            break;
                            case SDL_QUIT:
                                    quit = true;
                            break;
                    }
            }

            if (did_set)
            {
                    SDL_LockSurface(screen);
                    Uint32 p = SDL_MapRGB(screen->format, 255,255,255);
                    putpixel(screen, pX, pY, p);
                    SDL_UnlockSurface(screen);
            }
            SDL_Flip(screen);
    }
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ch ache the mouse movements in a container, and do all your drawing in one place. ie a render() function. Also, the number of comparisons you have going on, the switch statement to the if .. break your code up into functions or object member functions that handle what ever event you need. And keep the actual processing inside the loop to as little as possible. Do all this and you should see a significant improvement in execution speed. Currently with the code you posted your updating the screen on ever iteration of the while loop, when really all you need to do is update the screen –  johnathon Jul 16 '12 at 17:33
    
At strategic times, such as when the mouse is moved, and when the window needs to be repainted ( resized, obscured, ect) –  johnathon Jul 16 '12 at 17:35
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're only processing one event per "frame".

Try changing the SDL_PollEvent() if to a while:

const Uint32 p = SDL_MapRGB(screen->format, 255,255,255);
while (quit == false)
{
    while (SDL_PollEvent(&event))
    {
        switch(event.type)
        {
        case SDL_MOUSEBUTTONDOWN:
            {
                int pX = event.button.x;
                int pY = event.button.y;
                plot[pY][pX].setAlive(true);
                SDL_LockSurface(screen);
                putpixel(screen, pX, pY, p);
                SDL_UnlockSurface(screen);
            }
            break;
        case SDL_QUIT:
            quit = true;
            break;
        }
    }

    SDL_Flip(screen);
}
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You are likely getting multiple events during a single frame, but you only process one at a time, then wait for the next frame. In almost every SDL sample code you will see SDL_PollEvent inside a while statement.

Also, the mouse can move more than one pixel at a time, so you have to draw the whole line from the old position to the new one (with Bresenham's algorithm for example); at this point you better avoid using putpixel, as it does the whole multiplication to get the position in memory when you are actually just walking along columns and lines (which can be done with just additions.)

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