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I have a website that includes a home grown CMS system. We are looking for a stronger CMS solution but one that we can integrate into our existing architecture. A CMS that needs to 'own' the whole page is not going to work for us. We wish to have ASP.Net control the pages but insert dynamic content. We are particularly looking to improve the content editing and deployment ease of use.

Any ideas? Good experiences?

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8 Answers 8

I heard about N2 recently. It seems promising regarding the way it could be integrated into an existing ASP.NET (even ASP.NET MVC) application.

It is a growing open source project on Codeplex.

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+1 for N2 - I've been using their ASP.NET MVC variant for a few months now, and am very impressed with it - even on a medium trust shared host. That being said, the bulk of the source code is now on Google Code: code.google.com/p/n2cms –  Zhaph - Ben Duguid Nov 5 '09 at 16:00

DNN if you're looking for a free product. For a full-service CMS, check out Ektron

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Cuyahoga project is looking good. It's a open source, cross platform and the architecture is beautiful. It doesn't have all of the features but it's very easy to build additional modules with easy.

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While I haven't had much experience with it myself, I've heard good things about DotNetNuke (DNN) http://www.dotnetnuke.com/.

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As Mitchel says DNN wants to control the whole site something that will fit in a control is really what I am looking for. –  Timbo Sep 22 '08 at 14:34

DotNetNuke might work for you, however, to truly integrate any existing content you need to migrate to a user control basis to get your functionality into a "Module" format which is how DNN is used.

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DNN is only good if you want to create a site with no development experience. Developing software that integrates with it is a nightmare. –  Adam Lassek Nov 26 '08 at 14:52
    
@ALassek - I will respectfully disagree with you on this, DNN is VERY easy to work with, it does take a bit of time to get used to, but once you do, I haven't found ANYTHING that can't be done. The learning curve is just like any other CMS, Framework, Language, or System. –  Mitchel Sellers Nov 27 '08 at 3:43
    
I might have missed something about DNN but as far as I can see it definitely falls into the category of CMS that want to 'own the page' –  Timbo Feb 13 '09 at 14:39
    
Timbo - It really depends on what you want here...a CMS must own the page if it is going to be editing/controlling/inserting content, at least to a certain extent. –  Mitchel Sellers Feb 13 '09 at 22:44
    
DNN is a nightmare... I'm working for a shop that uses it... –  kitsune Mar 18 '09 at 15:26

You might consider looking at Sitefinity by Telerik. This CMS is rooted heavily in ASP.NET conventions. A lot of the stuff you use anyway (Master Pages, UserControls, Themes) can be used to extend & customize Sitefinity.

I'm not saying it will be cake, but it's very likely you'll be able to weave your existing CMS content & features into Sitefinity using some custom UserControls.

Sitefinity has an online demo on their web site, it might be worth a look.

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If you like XSLT, check out Umbraco

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Webnodes CMS ( www.webnodes.com ) has total separation between content and presentation. You have total control over how you develop your templates, and you can use it more or less like an ORM, but with CMS features like automatic filtering of all queries, based on access rights.

You also get a long list of other features, like url rewriting, media handling and an interface to edit and add content in. There is a custom LINQ provider built-in that lets you use LINQ for all data access.

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