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I have a database that needs to store customer data which I'm trying to figure out what tables I need. So far I was thinking something like this:

customer table:

  • id
  • company name
  • first name
  • surname
  • notes
  • telephone
  • alt telephone

Address table:

  • line1
  • line2
  • town
  • post code

site table(physical sites where work needs to be done)

  • site name
  • notes

A customer will have 1 contact address and 1 + site addresses. the two addresses may be the same (if the customer uses business address as contact). However sometimes the contact address will be different from the site addresses.

Would I need two address tables? one for the customer addresses and one for the site? also should telephone be a separate table as I will sometimes have 2 stored for each customer?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your design looks pretty good, though you probably want a id in address, and site as well. I am not sure if you want telephone in your customer table unless you limit the number of numbers that they can have. Does a site need an address (I onlly ask because I am not sure if it is a physical site vs website)? I bring this up because it can effect the design. If the only entity tied to an address is customer, then it would make sense to have a customer_id in address. However, if address is shared between customers, or used in the site table than I would make join tables for it.

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the site is a physical place that is unique to a single customer. –  dan Jul 16 '12 at 18:19
    
That makes sense (Im just use to seeing site referring to website). It probably makes sense to make join tables then for both customer and site with address. For example: customer_address: (customer_id, address_id) or site address: (site_id, address_id) –  John Kane Jul 16 '12 at 18:27
    
Hey, I don't understand how the join table is different from just linking customer to address with Customer_ID in the address table and Address_ID in the site table –  dan Jul 17 '12 at 19:32
    
That could work (though a site address would not need a customer id). The only real times it would not is if an address would be shared by more than one customer. You would need to duplicate the record. It is also just slightly cleaner and will make modifying the database a little easier. –  John Kane Jul 17 '12 at 19:43
    
Ah, I see now, thanks –  dan Jul 17 '12 at 19:57

You mentioned that the number of telephone numbers that a user can have is variable. In that case, I wouldn't hard code the customer having two phone numbers as you do right now. Having a separate Telephone number table would make this more flexible.

Telephone Table:

  • Customer ID (Foreign Key)
  • Telephone Number
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If you have a Customer table and Site table, you can reference Address table in them.

This would allow you to use the same address or different address for Customer and Site. Note that updating the address will update it for both Customer and Site.

Customer Table:

  • id
  • company name
  • first name
  • surname
  • notes
  • telephone
  • alt telephone
  • Address ID (Foreign Key)

Site Table:

  • id
  • site name
  • notes
  • Address ID (Foreign Key)

Address Table:

  • id
  • line1
  • line2
  • town
  • post code

As for phone number, the table can already handle 2 phone numbers. Do you mean they would have 2 primary numbers, then alternate?

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for tel number they will not always have 2 so one field may be left null. I think read that this was bad design? –  dan Jul 16 '12 at 18:24
    
I would leave it the way it is, and I have done so before. Our DBAs never said anything against it. Perhaps someone can elaborate on the bad design as I am not aware of it either. –  Zadam Jul 16 '12 at 20:11

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