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Keep in mind that I am still very new to python coding as I am only just into chapter 5 of my python coding class. Keeping that in mind, I am attempting to create a sum calculator using a "while loop" to continue until the user enters a negative number instead of a positive number.

In case I am not entirely clear in my description of my question I will post the exact homework problem here:

Chapter 5, page 200, #8 Sum of Numbers

Write a program with a while loop that asks the user to enter a series of positive numbers. The user should enter a negative number to signal the end of the series. After all the positive numbers have been entered, the program should display their sum.

Now for the code that I have written so far:

def main():
    number = float(input('Please enter in a positive number: '))
    while number > 0:
        positiveNumber()
    while number < 0:
        calculateTotal()
        printTotal()

def positiveNumber():
    number = float(input('If you are finished please enter a negative number.' + \ 'Otherwise, enter another positive number: '))
    while number > 0:
        positiveNumber()
    while number < 0:
        calculateTotal()
        printTotal()

def calculateTotal():
    total = 0 + number

def printTotal():
    print('The sum of your numbers is: ', total)

main()
  • In line 11, I have the "+ \" sign there because I wanted to make an enter space there in order to have a cleaner looking text, but that does not seem to work.

I apologize if this question seems "nooby" but I need help making a cleaner/working sum calculator. I would greatly appreciate it if someone can take a look at this code and hopefully help me improve it. Thank you!

Final Edit:

Thank you all for the informative answers! I learned alot (for a "newbie" =]). I used Talon876's answer for my calculator. Thanks again everyone!

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1  
So... which part is broken? –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jul 16 '12 at 18:11
    
nooby, it's really "newbie" :-) –  Levon Jul 16 '12 at 18:13
    
input is a bad idea ... instead use raw_input –  Joran Beasley Jul 16 '12 at 18:14
1  
If it's Python 3.x, then input() is what you get; there is no more raw_input(). –  steveha Jul 16 '12 at 19:07
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closed as too localized by Greg Hewgill, tereško, Beerlington, j0k, martin clayton Sep 18 '12 at 6:59

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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you want a single string to be printed on multiple lines, put a \n in the string. For example,

print "This is on the first line\nThis is on the second line"

would output

This is on the first line
This is on the second line

It looks like you're mixing a while loop with recursion (calling a method from within itself). I would suggest using a single while loop and an input variable to check for the breaking condition (the input is < 0)

It would look something like this:

sum = 0
number = float(input('Please enter in a positive number: '))
while number > 0:
    sum = sum + number
    number = float(input('If you are finished please enter a negative number.' + \ 'Otherwise, enter another positive number: ')) #fix this line using the information from the first part of the answer

This will loop until the user inputs a negative number, or 0. If you want to accept 0 as a positive number, change the while condition to number > -1

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You can't update a global variable in a python function without explicitly declaring it as a global. Observe:

a = 1
def foo():
    a = a + 6  #creates a new variable (a) that is confined to the "foo" namespace.
           #Note that it still uses a from the global namespace on the Right hand side
           #This is because python looks for a in the "foo" namespace first.  When
           #it isn't found there, it looks in the global namespace.  However, python
           #WON'T ASSIGN to something in the global namespace without being told 
           #to explicitly
    print (a)

foo() # 7
print (a)  # 1

def foo():
    global a #Tell python that it is OK to assign to variable "a" in the global namespace.
    a = a + 6
    print (a)

foo()   # 7
print (a) # 7

However, with this great power comes great responsibility. Many people will tell you to never use global variables. In a lot of ways, they're correct because just about anything you can accomplish with global variables can be accomplished more cleanly using some other method. My hope in writing this is not to convince you to use globals, but to help you understand one of the errors in your code.

One thing that you may want to try is to have your function accept the input number as an argument along with the total to this point and then return the new total.

Good luck!

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the problem is 1.you have not declared the variables you are using in function as global,to note the changes being made to them

2.you dont need while loops if you are implementing it by calling a function recursively!you need checking condition lik "if & else" here is an easy implementation of problem with while loop:

def main():
total=0
number = float(input('Please enter in a positive number: '))
while(number>0):
    total=total+number
    number = float(input('Please enter in a positive number to continue or a negative no. to stop: '))
print('The sum of your numbers is: %d'% total)
main()
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1  
You're not calling anything recursively here. –  mgilson Jul 16 '12 at 18:44
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I think you're looking for something like this? But I don't know what style constraints you are required to use.

number = float(input('Please enter in a positive number: '))
to_sum = []
while number > 0:
    to_sum.append(number)
    number = float(input('If you are finished please enter a negative number.\n' +
                         'Otherwise, enter another positive number: '))
print('The sume of your numbers is: ', sum(to_sum))

Please note that because the statement you are trying to break onto multiple lines is already within ()'s, you don't need the . You can just break the line.

Did the assignment require you to use so many crazy functions? Also, which version of Python are you using?

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One thing you need to learn is how to break up a program into functions. Some problems are better handled by a single block of code than by being split up, and I think this is one of them.

You need to calculate a single sum. You can handle that with a single variable, to which you add more numbers as the user enters them. Your code should be designed around this variable. If you try to split the code up into functions, you either need to use a global variable (not recommended!), or you need to pass the variable around among the functions, or perhaps you could put the variable into an object and then make the functions be "method" functions on the object. But simplest is just to write some code that uses the variable, and make all that code be a single block of code (either one function, or even just the code in your Python program).

Here is a solution:

sum = 0.0  # initial value; we will add values to this
print('Welcome to this program')
while True:
    s = input('User: enter data value or a negative number to stop')
    x = float(s)
    if x < 0:
        break
    sum += x  # add this value to update the sum
print('Here is your sum: {}'.format(sum))

So, here is what is good about the above code. All the places that need to work with the variable sum are all close together, and we can see them. We don't need to declare sum global, because we don't have multiple functions trying to all use it.

Look at that code, and ask yourself: would it be simpler or cleaner if we carved it up into multiple functions? If not, then don't do it.

The only tricky thing here is that we used while True: for the loop. This is because we want to do something (get input), then based on the result, decide whether to break out of the loop or continue, and then finally do something else based on the decision (update the sum).

It's possible to rewrite this to use a "flag" variable, and make the loop while flag: but I don't think it is cleaner:

sum = 0.0  # initial value; we will add values to this
print('Welcome to this program')
continue_loop = True
while continue_loop:
    s = input('User: enter data value or a negative number to stop')
    x = float(s)
    if x < 0:
        continue_loop = False
    else:
        sum += x  # add this value to update the sum
print('Here is your sum: {}'.format(sum))

Do you think it is clearer to have the continue_loop flag variable? Some textbooks say you should write your code this way, because they think it is a sin to use break to exit a loop in the middle; they think loops should only exit from the usual place (which, for a while loop, is the top).

What if you really wanted to use functions? Well, you could, but you still shouldn't use a global variable. In fact, if you are writing a "functional" solution, you don't need a sum variable at all!

Here is a functional solution.

def ask_and_sum():
    s = input('Hey dude enter a value or a negative to stop')
    x = float(s)
    if x < 0:
        return 0
    else:
        return x + ask_and_sum()

print('Welcome to this program')
print('Your sum is: {}'.format(ask_and_sum()))

Instead of an explicit loop, this uses "tail recursion", where a function ends with another call to itself. In this case, I personally prefer the explicit loop. What do you think?

P.S. This problem is so simple that it was hard to discuss it without giving you the full answer. I apologize for that. But even if you just copy the code, please look at it, and think about it, and make sure you understand it.

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