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I've been a php programmer for a number of years, but am only now getting into OOP. I have two classes so far, Item and List (I'm just simplifying here, they're not the real class names.) All of my data is accessed via a web service using SOAP.

I'm not sure what the best way is to implement getting a SOAP client and using it in multiple classes. For example, the WSDL defines an addItem function and a getList function. I also need to send a token to the service for each transaction.

Do I need to define a new SoapClient inside every class? like so:

class Item {
  // item properties
  function addItem($itemName) {
     $client = new SoapClient('myfile.wsdl');
     $client->addItem($itemName);
     //service returns true or false
  }
}

class List {
  function getList($listName) {
     $client = new SoapClient('myfile.wsdl');
     return $client->getList($listName);
     //service returns array
  }
}

Or is there some way to create a new SoapClient outside of the individual classes and use the same client object in each one?

share|improve this question
    
Your class should have a member variable of type SoapClient. – JonH Jul 16 '12 at 18:20
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Pass it into the constructor with some dependency injection:

class Item {

  function __constructor(SoapClient &$s){
      $this->soap = $s;
  }
  // item properties
  function addItem($itemName) {
     $this->soap->addItem($itemName);
     //service returns true or false
  }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Dependency injection is definitely preferred, but what's the point of &$s? The SoapClient instance is already passed in by reference ... – rdlowrey Jul 16 '12 at 18:28
    
@rdlowrey is it? I did not know that. – Neal Jul 16 '12 at 18:28
    
all objects since PHP 5... – Karoly Horvath Jul 16 '12 at 18:30
    
@KarolyHorvath where is that documented? – Neal Jul 16 '12 at 18:30
    
@Neal for all intents and purposes, yes (relevant manual entry): – rdlowrey Jul 16 '12 at 18:30

Depending on how you're using the SoapClient, you have a couple of options.

If you're going to use that SoapClient multiple times during the execution of the script (and it is thread safe?), you could use the singleton pattern to fetch an instance of the SoapClient. What this would allow you to do is to only create ONE instance of the object and then fetch it again each time you need it.

To fetch the object the code would look like.

$soapclass = $SoapClassSingleton::getInstance()

And the class behind would look something like

class SoapClassSingleton{
private instance;
public static function getInstance(){
    if(!self::instance){            
        self::$instance = new SoapClass();          
    }
    return self::$instance;
}

It's almost like having a "global" variable, but is only created if you need it and then the same object can be used by other classes. I use this design for logging in my applications.

You could also create an instance of the SoapClient and pass it into the the Class when you create it. See PHP's constructors for help.

Alternatively your classes could extend a class that contains the SoapController. The downside to doing this is that now you are tightly coupled with the superclass.

share|improve this answer

Oh dear, there are so many possible ways to do this. If you want to keep it the exact SAME in ALL portions of the script... you could use a singleton class.

Access:

MySoapConnection::instance()->function_calls_here

Class:

class MySoapConnection {

  /* Singleton */
  private static $_instance;
  public static function instance()
  {
    if (! self::$_instance):
      self::$_instance = new self();
    endif;
    return self::$_instance;
  }


  function __constructor(SoapClient $s){
      $this->soap = $s;
  }
  // item properties
  function addItem($itemName) {
     $this->soap->addItem($itemName);
     //service returns true or false
  }
}

As the comments state, I haven't tested. Nor should you copy/paste this code. Just shows a Singleton example. Nothing more, Nothing less. PHP was not built for OOP, I love PHP, was adapted to use OOP, not built for it.

share|improve this answer
    
Ummmm Singletons are uuuugly. – Neal Jul 16 '12 at 18:25
    
I agree Neal, but in PHP.... OOP is ugly. However, Singleton gets the job done here. :) – CrazyVipa Jul 16 '12 at 18:26
1  
Lol that is not true at all. Also this will fail you did not pass the SoapClient into the Singleton! – Neal Jul 16 '12 at 18:26
    
Psh. PHP OOP is fine as long as you don't go trying to do stupid stuff. – cHao Jul 16 '12 at 18:27
    
@Rastapopulous: Constructors don't return anything -- they just construct. As for taking a SoapClient, that's kinda a design decision; i'd say it should unless it's encapsulating all the functionality of establishing the connection and everything (and will never need a SoapClient that's set up differently). In which case you may have SRP issues waiting to cause you problems. – cHao Jul 16 '12 at 18:32

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