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I'm working with an HTML site which has a design that is fixed on a certain width, centered with auto as left and right margins. I'm working on an interactive script that sometimes creates a large table as output that will not fit into this width, it might be wider.

To illustrate:

​<html>
<body>
    <div style="margin: 10px auto; width: 300px; border: 1px blue solid;">
    &nbsp;
        <div style="margin: 10px auto; width: 400px; border: 1px red solid;">
        &nbsp;
        </div>
    </div>
</body>
</html>​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

(http://jsfiddle.net/ALPXn/)

My question is, how can I align the inner, red div in the center, no matter if it sticks out to both sides of the blue div, without giving it an explicit negative left margin, because I don't know the final width?

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Why do you need the first div inside the second? –  Mat Richardson Jul 16 '12 at 18:43
    
@Mat I didn't write the layout itself, but it consists of navigation, header, footer and everything, so every content that my PHP script outputs should really go into the place that was designed for content. –  Felix Dombek Jul 16 '12 at 18:44
1  
@FelixDombek so then shouldn't your content fit the 300px instead of trying to squeeze in wider content? –  Huangism Jul 16 '12 at 19:01
    
@Huangism No, doesn't matter, it's only for internal use and they've all got wide screens there. The design itself is just made to suit even 800*600px users. –  Felix Dombek Jul 16 '12 at 20:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think you can do this using jquery. You can change the css dynamically, after page has been loaded you can change css. Code will look similar to this.

var x = $('outerDiv').width();
var y = $('innerDiv').width();
​$('innerDiv')​​​​.css('left',-(y-x)/2)​;​

For that, you have to give divison id's as outerDiv and innerDiv.

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2  
While I agree with this approach, I don't think it's a good idea to include jQuery, unless the OP plans on using it extensively for other parts of his website. Generally I'm against including libraries to do one small thing that could be done with JavaScript itself. –  Scotty C. Jul 16 '12 at 19:41
    
@ScottyC. I don't know exactly how to do it in javascript that is why I gave jquery as an option. But the main idea is to change css by script. –  Rohit O Jul 16 '12 at 19:45
1  
Hey, that's cool, nobody knows everything. And like I said, this is a good method. If the OP already has jQuery on his site, I'd say this is a good answer. ;) –  Scotty C. Jul 16 '12 at 19:52
    
I don't use jQuery, but I can figure out how to do that with getElementById(...) :) –  Felix Dombek Jul 16 '12 at 20:20

The problem here is that you'd have to make the child element ignore the parent's width and position for this to work. It is possible with some javascript manipulation though. By changing the css position to absolute, and centering it relative to the screen, it will effectively ignore the parent, while still technically being contained by it.

Updated link using offsetWidth: http://jsfiddle.net/g6dGE/1/

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