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I have two tables, one for candidates and their skills, and the other for jobs and the skills required for the job, such as the ones shown below:

CSID = candidate skill ID (PK)
CID = candidate ID (FK)
S_CODE = skill code (FK)

Here is the candidate_skill table

+------------+---------+---------+
| CSID       | CID     |  S_CODE |
+------------+---------+---------+
| 1          | 1       | 5       |
| 2          | 1       | 9       |
| 3          | 2       | 5       |
| 4          | 2       | 10      |
+------------+---------+---------+

SJID = skill job ID (PK)
JID = job ID (FK)
S_CODE = skill code (FK)

Here is the skill_job table:

+------------+---------+---------+
| SJID       | JID     |  S_CODE |
+------------+---------+---------+
| 12         | 50      | 5       |
| 13         | 50      | 9       |
| 14         | 51      | 1       |
| 15         | 52      | 10      |
+------------+---------+---------+

So in this example, the only candidate would be 1 for the job 50, since the skill codes (S_CODE) are 5 and 9 for both, but i also would like candidate 2 to be a match to 52, since it has the required job skill and an extra one. I have tried several ways to match the job and candidate but I'm failing, an example of such a way is the code below:

    SELECT * , COUNT(skill_job.S_CODE) AS cnt FROM candidate_skill,
 skill_job WHERE candidate_skill.S_CODE = skill_job.S_CODE HAVING (cnt >=2)

the problem is, that only limits the candidate found to one and if i remove the COUNT clause, it lists all candidates that match with only one skill so candidate 2 would also be matched to the job 50.

Here is the mysql code for the tables from phpmyadmin:

    -- phpMyAdmin SQL Dump
-- version 3.4.5
-- http://www.phpmyadmin.net
--
-- Host: localhost
-- Generation Time: Jul 16, 2012 at 09:27 PM
-- Server version: 5.5.16
-- PHP Version: 5.3.8

SET SQL_MODE="NO_AUTO_VALUE_ON_ZERO";
SET time_zone = "+00:00";


/*!40101 SET @OLD_CHARACTER_SET_CLIENT=@@CHARACTER_SET_CLIENT */;
/*!40101 SET @OLD_CHARACTER_SET_RESULTS=@@CHARACTER_SET_RESULTS */;
/*!40101 SET @OLD_COLLATION_CONNECTION=@@COLLATION_CONNECTION */;
/*!40101 SET NAMES utf8 */;

--
-- Database: `employment`
--

-- --------------------------------------------------------

--
-- Table structure for table `candidate`
--

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `candidate` (
  `CID` int(4) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `title` varchar(5) NOT NULL,
  `fname` varchar(30) NOT NULL,
  `lname` varchar(30) NOT NULL,
  `dob` date NOT NULL,
  `email` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  `address` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `city` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  `postcode` varchar(10) NOT NULL,
  `phone_num` varchar(11) NOT NULL,
  `username` varchar(40) NOT NULL,
  `password` varchar(40) NOT NULL,
  `regdate` datetime NOT NULL,
  `acc_type` enum('c','s') NOT NULL DEFAULT 'c',
  `emailactivate` enum('0','1') NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
  `cv_name` varchar(60) NOT NULL,
  `cv` blob NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`CID`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 COMMENT='// this is the table for the candidates' AUTO_INCREMENT=175 ;

--
-- Dumping data for table `candidate`
--

INSERT INTO `candidate` (`CID`, `title`, `fname`, `lname`, `dob`, `email`, `address`, `city`, `postcode`, `phone_num`, `username`, `password`, `regdate`, `acc_type`, `emailactivate`, `cv_name`, `cv`) VALUES
(128, 'Mr', 'clement', 'Chilingulo', '0000-00-00', 'chlngl@yahoo.com', '28 oakfield Road', 'london', 'E6 1LW', '07771611873', 'casante', 'b59c67bf196a4758191e42f76670ceba', '0000-00-00 00:00:00', 'c', '0', '', '');
INSERT INTO `candidate` (`CID`, `title`, `fname`, `lname`, `dob`, `email`, `address`, `city`, `postcode`, `phone_num`, `username`, `password`, `regdate`, `acc_type`, `emailactivate`, `cv_name`, `cv`) VALUES
(134, 'Mr', 'rverv', 'revrb', '0000-00-00', 'tdbsdrt', 'trsbrtd', 'trbtrtrb', 'tbrfbgrts', 'trfbtrgbrfg', 'clement', 'b59c67bf196a4758191e42f76670ceba', '0000-00-00 00:00:00', 's', '0', '', '');
INSERT INTO `candidate` (`CID`, `title`, `fname`, `lname`, `dob`, `email`, `address`, `city`, `postcode`, `phone_num`, `username`, `password`, `regdate`, `acc_type`, `emailactivate`, `cv_name`, `cv`) VALUES
(165, 'Mr', 'oinInINOioni', 'ioin', '0000-00-00', 'inioimn', 'in', 'oin', 'oni', 'io', 'k', '7b8b965ad4bca0e41ab51de7b31363a1', '0000-00-00 00:00:00', 'c', '0', '', ''),
(166, 'Mr', 'pjINoNlkinoinoi', 'ino', '0000-00-00', 'oimpnponi', 'inoi', 'no', 'nj', 'nio', 'nio', 'eb5bc837d01b911029ae378e8a1c9f5d', '0000-00-00 00:00:00', 'c', '0', '', ''),
(167, 'Mr', 'vrae', 'ergvaer', '0000-00-00', 'aerbg', 'aergvera', 'aergvrea', 'aergvear', 'aergarev', 'grebvarvf', '609c1b136ec8d0d2dfdf9a2105fb605f', '0000-00-00 00:00:00', 'c', '0', '', ''),
(168, 'Mr', 'vrae', 'ergvaer', '0000-00-00', 'aerbg', 'aergvera', 'aergvrea', 'aergvear', 'aergarev', 'grebvarvf', '609c1b136ec8d0d2dfdf9a2105fb605f', '0000-00-00 00:00:00', 'c', '0', '', ''),
(169, 'Mr', 'ubp', 'bu', '0000-00-00', 'ubip', ';ub', 'ubi', 'ubo', 'buo', 'ubiipbu', '9f44ce1389a3e7372834ed730b559a5e', '0000-00-00 00:00:00', 'c', '0', '', ''),
(170, 'Mr', 'rvev', 'ferhbgetb', '0000-00-00', 'tsbtrb', 'trbstrb', 'trbsfb ', 'stb stb', 'vvfs', 'csdcdsvarewdcv', 'd41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e', '0000-00-00 00:00:00', 'c', '0', '', ''),
(171, 'Mr', 'rvev', 'ferhbgetb', '0000-00-00', 'tsbtrb', 'trbstrb', 'trbsfb ', 'stb stb', 'vvfs', 'csdcdsvarewdcv', 'd41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e', '0000-00-00 00:00:00', 'c', '0', '', ''),
(172, '', '', '', '0000-00-00', '', '', '', '', '', '', 'd41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e', '0000-00-00 00:00:00', 'c', '0', '', ''),
(173, '', 'dds', 'vrv av', '0000-00-00', 'rvear', 'vreverav', 'rvedfsdv', 'frvdvf', 'fveavd', 'vdrareavdv', '84c71ac76340092398a1ed4bc7d6fe19', '0000-00-00 00:00:00', 'c', '0', '', ''),
(174, '', 'dds', 'vrv av', '0000-00-00', 'rvedwear', 'vreverav', 'rvedfsdv', 'frvdvf', 'fveavd', 'vdraredfcavdv', 'd41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e', '0000-00-00 00:00:00', 'c', '0', '', '');

-- --------------------------------------------------------

--
-- Table structure for table `candidate_skill`
--

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `candidate_skill` (
  `CSID` int(4) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `CID` int(4) NOT NULL,
  `S_CODE` int(4) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`CSID`),
  KEY `CID` (`CID`),
  KEY `S_CODE` (`S_CODE`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 COMMENT='//match candidate and skill' AUTO_INCREMENT=131 ;

--
-- Dumping data for table `candidate_skill`
--

INSERT INTO `candidate_skill` (`CSID`, `CID`, `S_CODE`) VALUES
(114, 134, 2),
(116, 134, 9),
(121, 134, 5),
(126, 128, 1);

-- --------------------------------------------------------

--
-- Table structure for table `job`
--

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `job` (
  `JID` int(4) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `job_title` varchar(40) NOT NULL,
  `job_desc` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `start_date` date NOT NULL,
  `end_date` date NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`JID`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 COMMENT='// this is the table for the job vacancies' AUTO_INCREMENT=10 ;

--
-- Dumping data for table `job`
--

INSERT INTO `job` (`JID`, `job_title`, `job_desc`, `start_date`, `end_date`) VALUES
(1, 'engineer', ' fix engineering ish that is messed ', '0000-00-00', '0000-00-00'),
(5, 'pilot', '', '0000-00-00', '0000-00-00'),
(8, 'Charity Helper', ' ', '0000-00-00', '0000-00-00'),
(9, 'accountant', '  ', '0000-00-00', '0000-00-00');

-- --------------------------------------------------------

--
-- Table structure for table `skill`
--

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `skill` (
  `S_CODE` int(4) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT COMMENT '// this is the skill primary key',
  `skill_name` varchar(40) NOT NULL,
  `skill_desc` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`S_CODE`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 AUTO_INCREMENT=11 ;

--
-- Dumping data for table `skill`
--

INSERT INTO `skill` (`S_CODE`, `skill_name`, `skill_desc`) VALUES
(1, 'speaking', 'English is your first language'),
(2, '  writing', 'You can write English very well'),
(3, ' public', ''),
(5, 'initiative', ''),
(6, 'interviewing', ''),
(7, 'negotiating', ''),
(8, 'leading', ''),
(9, '  energy', ''),
(10, ' organisation', '');

-- --------------------------------------------------------

--
-- Table structure for table `skill_job`
--

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `skill_job` (
  `SJID` int(4) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `JID` int(4) NOT NULL,
  `S_CODE` int(4) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`SJID`),
  KEY `S_CODE` (`S_CODE`),
  KEY `JID` (`JID`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 AUTO_INCREMENT=106 ;

--
-- Dumping data for table `skill_job`
--

INSERT INTO `skill_job` (`SJID`, `JID`, `S_CODE`) VALUES
(91, 5, 2),
(94, 5, 5),
(95, 5, 9),
(98, 1, 1),
(102, 1, 8),
(105, 8, 8);

--
-- Constraints for dumped tables
--

--
-- Constraints for table `candidate_skill`
--
ALTER TABLE `candidate_skill`
  ADD CONSTRAINT `candidate_skill_ibfk_3` FOREIGN KEY (`CID`) REFERENCES `candidate` (`CID`) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE,
  ADD CONSTRAINT `candidate_skill_ibfk_4` FOREIGN KEY (`S_CODE`) REFERENCES `skill` (`S_CODE`) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE;

--
-- Constraints for table `skill_job`
--
ALTER TABLE `skill_job`
  ADD CONSTRAINT `skill_job_ibfk_4` FOREIGN KEY (`JID`) REFERENCES `job` (`JID`) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE,
  ADD CONSTRAINT `skill_job_ibfk_5` FOREIGN KEY (`S_CODE`) REFERENCES `skill` (`S_CODE`) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE;

/*!40101 SET CHARACTER_SET_CLIENT=@OLD_CHARACTER_SET_CLIENT */;
/*!40101 SET CHARACTER_SET_RESULTS=@OLD_CHARACTER_SET_RESULTS */;
/*!40101 SET COLLATION_CONNECTION=@OLD_COLLATION_CONNECTION */;
share|improve this question
2  
It isn't very obvious as to what CSID, CID, S_CODE, SJID, and JID stand for. –  wecsam Jul 16 '12 at 19:08
    
lemme edit it then –  clem j Jul 16 '12 at 19:09
2  
In the first table, the last row's 'csid' is 3, is that accurate? Not understanding columns as well. –  fie Jul 16 '12 at 19:11
    
Can you stick an SQL script full of insert queries so we can get a feel for these tables without squinting at them? –  hexafraction Jul 16 '12 at 19:12
    
@fie sorry, edited –  clem j Jul 16 '12 at 19:14

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Double negation is your friend (though I don't know MySQL well enough to tell whether it supports it):

SELECT DISTINCT CS.CID, SJ.JID
FROM CANDIDATE_SKILL CS
JOIN SKILL_JOB SJ ON CS.S_CODE = SJ.S_CODE
WHERE NOT EXISTS(SELECT 1
                 FROM SKILL_JOB SJ2
                 WHERE SJ.JID = SJ2.JID
                   AND NOT EXISTS(SELECT 1
                                  FROM CANDIDATE_SKILL CS2
                                  WHERE CS.CID = CS2.CID
                                    AND SJ2.S_CODE = CS2.S_CODE))

A 'human translation' of this is to say that there should not exists any skill required for the job that the candidate doesn't have.

share|improve this answer
    
you might not know MySQL well but I assure you, you are awesome, the code worked wonderfully –  clem j Jul 16 '12 at 19:37
    
Yeah that was a great effort, Set :) –  Andrius Naruševičius Jul 16 '12 at 20:27

It seems like you'll need to use an INNER JOIN to combine your two tables and then compare their row values.

share|improve this answer
    
FROM candidate_skill,skill_job is the same as an INNER JOIN. –  Rocket Hazmat Jul 16 '12 at 19:12
    
@Rocket It is not :) –  Andrius Naruševičius Jul 16 '12 at 19:12
    
@AndriusNaruševičius: Yes it is. "INNER JOIN and , (comma) are semantically equivalent in the absence of a join condition" docs: dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/join.html –  Rocket Hazmat Jul 16 '12 at 19:14
    
@Rocket Interesting, I did not know this! Thanks for the heads up. –  the_red_baron Jul 16 '12 at 19:24
    
It just is completely impossible :) With INNER you join on something. With comma, there is no need to provide what you join on, so you can get Decart's matrix. Try getting Decart's matrix with INNER. –  Andrius Naruševičius Jul 16 '12 at 19:30

Should be something like this..

SELECT
   CID
FROM 
   candidate_skill
WHERE
   S_CODE IN (
               SELECT S_CODE FROM skill_jobs where JID = 52 
             )
GROUP BY CID

CORRECTION: Previous query will fail to match all required S_CODE

SELECT
   CID, COUNT(CSID) as cnt
FROM 
   candidate_skill
INNER JOIN skill_jobs 
WHERE
   S_CODE IN (
               SELECT S_CODE FROM skill_jobs where JID = 52 
             )
GROUP BY CID 
HAVING cnt = (
               SELECT count(*) from skill_jobs where JID = 52
             )
share|improve this answer

You will need a bit more complicated JOIN, and I see no easy way of simultaneously answering your request and the obvious ones "How is candidate X matched for job Y?" and "HOW MUCH does candidate X fit job Y?".

Anyway, here goes.

SELECT candidate_skill.CID, skill_job.JID, COUNT(*) AS has, sjtot.needed
    FROM skill_job JOIN candidate_skill ON (candidate_skill.S_CODE = skill_job.S_CODE)
    LEFT JOIN ( SELECT JID, COUNT(*) AS needed FROM skill_job GROUP BY JID ) AS sjtot
        ON ( skill_job.JID = sjtot.JID )
GROUP BY CID, JID
HAVING has >= needed;

In practice I first group the required skills on skill_job, and this tells me that job 50 requires two skills.

Armed with this, I LEFT JOIN required and candidate skills; some candidates will join on all skills, some won't. It is then just a matter of counting how many do match.

+------+------+-----+--------+
| CID  | JID  | has | needed |
+------+------+-----+--------+
|    1 |   50 |   2 |      2 |
|    2 |   52 |   1 |      1 |
+------+------+-----+--------+

On second thought, required skill level and offered skill levels might be selected, and CASE WHEN used to extract a match (1 if offered >= required, offered/required otherwise). The average of the resulting values might then be used as a "skill match" index.

As for the "How is X matched for Y?" question, once you know that candidate CID 1 is good for job JID 50, you can run a LEFT JOIN between the candidates and the jobs. You already know that whatever the jobs asks, the candidate has, but this way you retrieve what unasked-for skills the candidate has, and the other relevant values as well.

A nested query joining the query above and this last one would perhaps tell you everything in one fell swoop, but it would be a costly swoop, I think :-)

share|improve this answer

If you don't care about cross-dbms support, you can use mysql specific group_concat to reduce the two s_code sets to strings, one per candidate/job and just compare them like this:

select * from 
(select cs.cid, group_concat(cs.s_code order by cs.s_code) skills 
    from candidate_skill cs group by cs.cid) cs, 
(select sj.jid, group_concat(sj.s_code order by sj.s_code) skills 
    from skill_job sj group by sj.jid) sj
where sj.skills = cs.skills

Be aware of that when your tables grown the the final where will be slower and slower and you can't create indexes on the group_concat() created fields.

share|improve this answer

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