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Here's my failed attempt:

#define decltype(...) std::identity<decltype(__VA_ARGS__)>::type

template<typename T>
auto* degrade(const T& f) -> decltype(&T::operator())
{
    return &T::operator();
} 

int main()
{
    std::array<void(int), 1> stuff =
    {
        degrade([](int){})
    };
}
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What are you trying to achieve? Why don't you use std::function instead? –  Nawaz Jul 16 '12 at 19:22
    
@Nawaz It's mostly for the sake of doing it. Incidentally I've tried 50 permutations of the above, that exact one doesn't make total sense, but you get the idea. The decltype macro is there to enable using scope resolution with decltype (which VS2010 doesn't support) –  Dave Jul 16 '12 at 19:24
    
But why do you want to turn lambda into a function pointer? Why that need arose in the first place? –  Nawaz Jul 16 '12 at 19:25
1  
@ephemient Lambdas without captures ARE convertible to function pointers. VS2010 doesn't support it. - Nawaz the library I'm using has a method that takes a function pointer, It would be slightly cleaner to use a lambda (it's not a big deal, but I wanted to see if it was possible in VS2010) –  Dave Jul 16 '12 at 19:27
1  
@Dave not this one. It's one that requires magic, because the lambdas themselves are opaque magic types. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jul 16 '12 at 19:42

1 Answer 1

In the comment you said,

VS2010 doesn't support it. - Nawaz the library I'm using has a method that takes a function pointer, It would be slightly cleaner to use a lambda (it's not a big deal, but I wanted to see if it was possible in VS2010)

In that case, you could use local struct and define a static function in that. Something like this (well if it helps you):

#include <iostream>

void call(void (*f)(int))
{
    for(int i = 0 ; i < 10 ; i++)
         f(10 * i);
}

int main() 
{
    struct local
    {
        static void print(int i) { std::cout << i << std::endl; }
    };
    call(&local::print);
}

It is handy - more or less like C++11 lambda. You can define a static member function locally, and pass around it to other functions.

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