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I want to not repeat a specific piece of code and need advice on how to structure it better

public static final int TAB_A= 0;
public static final int TAB_B= 2;
public static final int TAB_C= 3;
public static final int NO_TAB = -1;

public String getTabName() {
    switch (getTabId()) {
        case TAB_A:
            return "TA";
        case TAB_B:
            return "TB";
        case TAB_C:
            return "TC";
        default:
            return "NT";
    }
}

public string execute() {  
  setResults(getTabName());
}

public int getUserCount() {
    SomeVO vo = (SomeVO) getFirstResultSet().get(0);
    switch (getTabId()) {
        case TAB_A:
            return vo.getTabAResults();
        case TAB_B:
            return vo.getTabBResults();
        case TAB_C:
            return vo.getTabCResults();
        default:
            return vo.getSomeStuff();
    }        
}  

I'd like to able to consolidate the logic in getTabName() and getUserCount() methods.

Having switch statements checking for the same thing doesn't seem efficient, but they are returning two different things....

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What is wrong with the way you are doing it? They are returning two different data types, hence the need for two functions. –  Chris Dargis Jul 16 '12 at 19:39
1  
@Doug, nothing as far as I can see. The only solutions I can think of are classic examples of overengineering. –  purtip31 Jul 16 '12 at 19:40
1  
You may want to use an enum instead of static ints, just throwing that out there (replaces things like int currentTab = TAB_A with Tab currentTab = TAB_B. –  purtip31 Jul 16 '12 at 19:42
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7 Answers

The only solution I can think of, which is balanced between simple and not overengineered (as greatly highlighted in one of the comments) is:

private <T> T mapFromTabId(T a, T b, T c, T def) {
    switch (getTabId()) {
        case TAB_A:
            return a;
        case TAB_B:
            return b;
        case TAB_C:
            return c;
        default:
            return def;
    }
}

and you use it like this:

public String getTabName() {
    return mapFromTabId("TA", "TB", "TC", "NT");
}

public int getUserCount() {
    return mapFromTabId(vo.getTabAResults(), vo.getTabBResults(), vo.getTabCResults(), vo.getSomeStuff());
}

The only problem with this approach is that all arguments are evaluated eagerly, which is not a problem in your case, but might be in others.

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In my own problems of this kind, I use reflection shamelessly. It actually blends well with enums. –  Marko Topolnik Jul 16 '12 at 19:57
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Here is an example using enum to do the dirty work:

import java.lang.reflect.Method;

public class Test {

    public enum TABS {
        TAB_A("TA", "getTabAResults"),
        TAB_B("TB", "getTabBResults"),
        TAB_C("TC", "getTabCResults"),
        NO_TAB("NT", "getSomeStuff");

        private String name, method;

        private TABS(String name, String method) {
            this.name = name;
            this.method = method;
        }

        public String getName() {
            return name;
        }

        public int getResults(SomeVO vo) {
            int result = -1;
            try {
                Method m = vo.getClass().getMethod(method);
                result = (Integer) m.invoke(vo, (Object[]) null);
            } catch (Exception ex) {
                ex.printStackTrace();
            }
            return result;
        }
    }

    static class SomeVO {
        public int getTabAResults() {
            return 1;
        }

        public int getTabBResults() {
            return 2;
        }

        public int getTabCResults() {
            return 3;
        }

        public int getSomeStuff() {
            return 4;
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SomeVO someVO = new SomeVO();
        System.out.println(TABS.TAB_A.getName() + " is "
                + TABS.TAB_A.getResults(someVO));
        System.out.println(TABS.TAB_B.getName() + " is "
                + TABS.TAB_B.getResults(someVO));
        System.out.println(TABS.TAB_C.getName() + " is "
                + TABS.TAB_C.getResults(someVO));
        System.out.println(TABS.NO_TAB.getName() + " is "
                + TABS.NO_TAB.getResults(someVO));
    }
}
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I would use a Java enum instead of static ints and switch clauses. The good thing about enums is that you constrain the values to be exactly those you declare.

public enum AnEnum {
    VAL_A {
        public String getName() { return "A"; }
        public int getResult(Thing t) { return t.getResultsA(); }
    };

    public abstract String getName();
    public abstract int getResult(Thing t);
}

Also worth looking at the enums docs at Oracle

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use enums like this:

public static enum TableType {

    TAB_A(0, "TA"){
        private int _getUserCound(SomeVO vo){
            return vo.getTabAResults();
        }
    },
    TAB_B(2, "TB"){
        private int _getUserCound(SomeVO vo){
            return vo.getTabBResults();
        }
    },
    TAB_C(3, "TC"){
        private int _getUserCound(SomeVO vo){
            return vo.getTabCResults();
        }
    },
    NO_TAB(-1, "NT"){
        private int _getUserCound(SomeVO vo){
            return vo.getSomeStuff();
        }
    };

    int id;
    String name;
    private TableType(int id, String name) {
        this.id = id;
        this.name = name;
    }

    public int getId() {
        return id;
    }

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    private abstract int _getUserCound(SomeVO vo);

    public int getUserCount(){
        SomeVO vo = (SomeVO) getFirstResultSet().get(0);
        return _getUserCound(vo);
    }

    public static TableType fromId(int id){
        for (TableType v : values()){
            if (v.getId() == id) return v;
        }
        return NO_TAB;
    }

}

public String getTabName() {
    return TableType.fromId(getTabId()).getName();
}

public string execute() {
    setResults(getTabName());
}

public int getUserCount() {
    return TableType.fromId(getTabId()).getUserCount();
}
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Create an interface or abstract class for the common aspects of a tab and then use implementation classes for each. In psuedo-code:

public abstract class Tab {
    public abstract String getTabName();
    public abstract int getUserCount();

    // ...
}

public final class TabA extends Tab {
    private static final String NAME = "TA";

    // ...

    @Override
    public String getTabName() {
        return NAME;
    }

    @Override
    public int getUserCount() {
      SomeVO vo = (SomeVO)getFirstResultSet().get(0);
      return vo.getResults();
    }
}

You can use enums to maintain a list of them, but be careful with putting implementation logic in an enum.

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use an enum that as a CTOR for each of its values takes the values you need (like the "TA" ,...) , store it within the CTOR , and use a method return this value .

this way you don't need to use the switch.

link: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/enum.html

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Better to use a bean class and add attributes/operations for access and mutating to that class. You can do Constructor Injection or Setter Injection, I prefer Setter Injection which decouples my code from bean.

And write a method which returns a Bean, in switch set the values in the bean and return bean. By which you are actually maintaining your code in one place and all the data together. On my view this is the simplest solution. Hope this helps you.

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