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I am looking for an algorithm that I can use to evaluate mathematical expressions. I've seen a few questions on SO that are simmilar but the answers are C#/Delphi or python specific. I need to write the algorithm in C :)

The problem I am trying to solve is given a user input like

3*(2*x + 1)/x

I can evaluate the expression for any value of x.

What algorithms are available to do this? If you would like to suggest a library that already does this, then I would prefer a C library

Thank you

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10  
Not C but rather a C++ alternative I've used in the past is the ExprTk library. It's easy to use and fast in evaluation. partow.net/programming/exprtk/index.html –  Jared Krumsie May 6 '12 at 6:27

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

An alternative to implementing your own parser and expression evaluator would be to link against a library that provides one for you to use. An interesting choice would be an easily embedded scripting language such as Lua.

It is straightforward to set up a Lua interpreter instance, and pass it expressions to be evaluated, getting back a function to call that evaluates the expression. You can even let the user have variables...

Update: LE, A simple expression evaluator using Lua

Here is a sketchy implementation of a simple expression evaluator based on a Lua interpreter. I compiled this and tried it for a few cases, but it certainly should not be trusted in production code without some attention to error handling and so forth. All the usual caveats apply here.

I compiled and tested this on Windows using Lua 5.1.4 from Lua for Windows. On other platforms, you'll have to find Lua from your usual source, or from www.lua.org.

Public interface to LE

Here is the file le.h:

/* Public API for the LE library.
 */
int le_init();
int le_loadexpr(char *expr, char **pmsg);
double le_eval(int cookie, char **pmsg);
void le_unref(int cookie);
void le_setvar(char *name, double value);
double le_getvar(char *name);

Sample code using LE

Here is the file t-le.c, demonstrating a simple use of this library. It takes its single command-line argument, loads it as an expression, and evaluates it with the global variable x changing from 0.0 to 1.0 in 11 steps:

#include <stdio.h>
#include "le.h"

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    int cookie;
    int i;
    char *msg = NULL;

    if (!le_init()) {
    printf("can't init LE\n");
    return 1;
    }
    if (argc<2) {
    printf("Usage: t-le \"expression\"\n");
    return 1;
    }
    cookie = le_loadexpr(argv[1], &msg);
    if (msg) {
    printf("can't load: %s\n", msg);
    free(msg);
    return 1;
    }
    printf("  x    %s\n"
       "------ --------\n", argv[1]);
    for (i=0; i<11; ++i) {
    double x = i/10.;
    double y;

    le_setvar("x",x);
    y = le_eval(cookie, &msg);
    if (msg) {
        printf("can't eval: %s\n", msg);
        free(msg);
        return 1;
    }
    printf("%6.2f %.3f\n", x,y);
    }
}

Here is some output from t-le:

E:...>t-le "math.sin(math.pi * x)"
  x    math.sin(math.pi * x)
------ --------
  0.00 0.000
  0.10 0.309
  0.20 0.588
  0.30 0.809
  0.40 0.951
  0.50 1.000
  0.60 0.951
  0.70 0.809
  0.80 0.588
  0.90 0.309
  1.00 0.000

E:...>

Implementation of LE

Here is le.c, implementing the Lua Expression evaluator:

#include <lua.h>
#include <lauxlib.h>

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

static lua_State *L = NULL;

/* Initialize the LE library by creating a Lua state.
 *
 * The new Lua interpreter state has the "usual" standard libraries
 * open.
 */
int le_init()
{
    L = luaL_newstate();
    if (L) 
    luaL_openlibs(L);
    return !!L;
}

/* Load an expression, returning a cookie that can be used later to
 * select this expression for evaluation by le_eval(). Note that
 * le_unref() must eventually be called to free the expression.
 *
 * The cookie is a lua_ref() reference to a function that evaluates the
 * expression when called. Any variables in the expression are assumed
 * to refer to the global environment, which is _G in the interpreter.
 * A refinement might be to isolate the function envioronment from the
 * globals.
 *
 * The implementation rewrites the expr as "return "..expr so that the
 * anonymous function actually produced by lua_load() looks like:
 *
 *     function() return expr end
 *
 *
 * If there is an error and the pmsg parameter is non-NULL, the char *
 * it points to is filled with an error message. The message is
 * allocated by strdup() so the caller is responsible for freeing the
 * storage.
 * 
 * Returns a valid cookie or the constant LUA_NOREF (-2).
 */
int le_loadexpr(char *expr, char **pmsg)
{
    int err;
    char *buf;

    if (!L) {
    if (pmsg)
        *pmsg = strdup("LE library not initialized");
    return LUA_NOREF;
    }
    buf = malloc(strlen(expr)+8);
    if (!buf) {
    if (pmsg)
        *pmsg = strdup("Insufficient memory");
    return LUA_NOREF;
    }
    strcpy(buf, "return ");
    strcat(buf, expr);
    err = luaL_loadstring(L,buf);
    free(buf);
    if (err) {
    if (pmsg)
        *pmsg = strdup(lua_tostring(L,-1));
    lua_pop(L,1);
    return LUA_NOREF;
    }
    if (pmsg)
    *pmsg = NULL;
    return luaL_ref(L, LUA_REGISTRYINDEX);
}

/* Evaluate the loaded expression.
 * 
 * If there is an error and the pmsg parameter is non-NULL, the char *
 * it points to is filled with an error message. The message is
 * allocated by strdup() so the caller is responsible for freeing the
 * storage.
 * 
 * Returns the result or 0 on error.
 */
double le_eval(int cookie, char **pmsg)
{
    int err;
    double ret;

    if (!L) {
    if (pmsg)
        *pmsg = strdup("LE library not initialized");
    return 0;
    }
    lua_rawgeti(L, LUA_REGISTRYINDEX, cookie);
    err = lua_pcall(L,0,1,0);
    if (err) {
    if (pmsg)
        *pmsg = strdup(lua_tostring(L,-1));
    lua_pop(L,1);
    return 0;
    }
    if (pmsg)
    *pmsg = NULL;
    ret = (double)lua_tonumber(L,-1);
    lua_pop(L,1);
    return ret;
}


/* Free the loaded expression.
 */
void le_unref(int cookie)
{
    if (!L)
    return;
    luaL_unref(L, LUA_REGISTRYINDEX, cookie);    
}

/* Set a variable for use in an expression.
 */
void le_setvar(char *name, double value)
{
    if (!L)
    return;
    lua_pushnumber(L,value);
    lua_setglobal(L,name);
}

/* Retrieve the current value of a variable.
 */
double le_getvar(char *name)
{
    double ret;

    if (!L)
    return 0;
    lua_getglobal(L,name);
    ret = (double)lua_tonumber(L,-1);
    lua_pop(L,1);
    return ret;
}

Remarks

The above sample consists of 189 lines of code total, including a spattering of comments, blank lines, and the demonstration. Not bad for a quick function evaluator that knows how to evaluate reasonably arbitrary expressions of one variable, and has rich library of standard math functions at its beck and call.

You have a Turing-complete language underneath it all, and it would be an easy extension to allow the user to define complete functions as well as to evaluate simple expressions.

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could you give more details to this, because it might be a more worthwhile approach than the other answers (even though I did ask for an algorithm) Thanks –  hhafez Jul 20 '09 at 23:00
    
Sure. I edited the question. –  RBerteig Jul 21 '09 at 1:55
    
if I could give you more than +1 I would that is an excellent answer ;) –  hhafez Sep 13 '09 at 23:10

I asked Google for "recursive descent expression parser" (I don't blame you for not knowing what to look for) and found Parsing Expressions by Recursive Descent which provides an introduction to some useful parsing techniques.

Also, the Wikipedia article on Recursive descent parser includes a fairly complete example in C.

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2  
Ding, ding, ding, ding! That's the right answer! It's a language parsing problem. –  NoMoreZealots Jul 19 '09 at 23:23
    
This is also the right way to answer when knowing the answer provides insight into Googling that the OP wouldn't have had. Bravo. –  Bill the Lizard Jul 20 '09 at 16:05

The algorithm you need here is the Shunting Yard Algorithm.

This allows you to convert an in-fix expression into Reverse Polish notation, which is quite simple to evaluate programatically.

The Shunting Yard Algorithm is quite involved, but my experiences is that you can code it up just as its written and it all works - you don't have to go to the trouble of analysing it.

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the difficulty remains in the parser though :) –  hhafez Jul 19 '09 at 23:30

This isn't a C answer but Bjarne Stroustrup's The C++ Programming Language devotes a chapter to this exact problem. You could adapt it to C.

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C++ is close enough ;) but I don't have the book –  hhafez Jul 19 '09 at 23:10
    
That's cool. The way Stroustrup tackles the problem is recursive descent, so you'll be fine working with the resources in the answer you accepted. It's chapter 6 (Expressions and Statements) if you're ever interested. –  John Jul 22 '09 at 15:43

You can use Shunting-yard algorithm, it work's great and enables you to parse functions etc. at ease. It doesn't actually compute it, but it converts an expression to ONP, which can be evaluated very easily.

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You could look at "XpathNavigator.Evaluate" I have used this to process mathematical expressions for my GridView and it works fine for me.

Here is the code I used for my program:

public static double Evaluate(string expression)
    {
        return (double)new System.Xml.XPath.XPathDocument
        (new StringReader("<r/>")).CreateNavigator().Evaluate
        (string.Format("number({0})", new
        System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex(@"([\+\-\*])")
        .Replace(expression, " ${1} ")
        .Replace("/", " div ")
        .Replace("%", " mod ")));
    }
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is that java or c# –  hhafez Sep 13 '09 at 23:03

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