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I have a config.ru file that is starting to have duplicate code:

map '/route1' do
  run SampleApp.new
end

map '/route2' do
  run SampleApp.new
end

I would like to turn this config.ru file into its own Rack application so that all I have to do is:

map '/' do
  run MyApp.new
end

What is the correct way to create your own Rack application? Specifically, how can I create a class so that I can use the map method within my class to define a bunch of routes?


Solution:

Here is a working solution:

class MyApp

  def initialize
    @app = Rack::Builder.new do
      # copy contents of your config.ru into this block
      map '/route1' do
        run SampleApp.new
      end

      map '/route2' do
        run SampleApp.new
      end
    end
  end

  def call(env)
    @app.call(env)
  end
end

I tried this before, but couldn't get it to work because I was trying to pass instance variables to the map blocks. For example:

def initialize
  @sample_app = SampleApp.new
  @app = Rack::Builder.new do
    map '/route1' do
      run @sample_app   # will not work
    end
  end
end

The reason this will not work is because the block being passed to map is being evaluated in the context of a Rack::Builder instance.

However, it will work if I pass a local variable:

def initialize
  sample_app = SampleApp.new
  @app = Rack::Builder.new do
    map '/route1' do
      run sample_app   # will work
    end
  end
end
share|improve this question
    
Just check for the request path in your #call method and add conditional statements –  Lee Jarvis Jul 16 '12 at 21:16
    
@injekt can you provide an example of what that would look like? –  Andrew Jul 16 '12 at 21:17
    
check my example in my answer, I can add more if it helps but that's the most basic –  Lee Jarvis Jul 16 '12 at 21:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The DSL used in config.ru is defined in Rack::Builder. When using a config.ru, contents of the file are passed to an instance of Builder to create the Rack app. You can do this directly yourself in code.

For example, you can take the contents of your existing config.ru, and create a new class from it:

require 'rack'

class MyApp

  def initialize
    @app = Rack::Builder.new do
      # copy contents of your config.ru into this block
      map '/route1' do
        run SampleApp.new
      end

      map '/route2' do
        run SampleApp.new
      end
    end
  end

  def call(env)
    @app.call(env)
  end
end

You need the call method so that your class is a Rack app, but you can just forward the request on to the app you create with Builder. Then you can create your new config.ru that uses your new app:

require './my_app'

run MyApp.new
share|improve this answer
    
This is pretty much what I am trying to do, and in fact, already tried this very thing. The problem I ran into was I wanted to pass instance variables from my class into the map blocks, but that didn't work because they are being evaluated in the context of a new Rack::Builder instance. Do you know of a way that I could subclass Rack::Builder so that I don't have to instantiate a Rack::Builder instance? –  Andrew Jul 16 '12 at 22:42
    
@Andrew I’m not sure subclassing is the way to go, since Rack::Builder recursively creates instances of itself with self.class and I don’t think you want to get in the way of that. –  matt Jul 17 '12 at 0:06
    
@Andrew One posible way to avoid the block being evaluated in the context of the Builder would be to create the builder object first, and then explicitly call the DSL methods on that object, e.g. builder = Rack::Builder.new followed by builder.map '/route1' do ... etc. You could even push this idea a bit further using the forwardable module if you want to keep the “plain” DSL methods. –  matt Jul 17 '12 at 0:08

Here is a really basic example. You should probably look into Rack::Response for handling the response rather than building it yourself, but it gives you a good idea of how basic Rack middleware works:

class MyApp
  def call(env)
    request = Rack::Request.new(env)
    headers = { 'Content-Type' => 'text/html' }

    case request.path
    when '/'
      [200, headers, ["You're at the root url!"]]
    when '/foo'
      [200, headers, ["You're at /foo!"]]
    else
      [404, headers, ["Uh oh, path not found!"]]
    end
  end
end

EDIT:

Mapping multiple Rack apps into one:

class RootApp
  def call(env)
    [200, {'Content-Type' => 'text/html' }, ['Main root url']]
  end
end

class FooApp
  def call(env)
    [200, {'Content-Type' => 'text/html' }, ['Foo app url!']]
  end
end

class MyApp
  def initialize
    @apps = {}
  end

  def map(route, app)
    @apps[route] = app
  end

  def call(env)
    request = Rack::Request.new(env)

    if @apps[request.path]
      @apps[request.path].call(env)
    else
      [404, {'Content-Type' => 'text/html' }, ['404 not found']]
    end
  end
end

app = MyApp.new
app.map '/', RootApp.new
app.map '/foo', FooApp.new

run app
share|improve this answer
    
hmm...that is helpful. However, I need to run a Rack application at each path defined. So I don't think this solution is going to work. Do you know how I could do that? –  Andrew Jul 16 '12 at 21:29
    
@Andrew that's exactly what you've already done? –  Lee Jarvis Jul 16 '12 at 21:31
    
@Andrew see my update. Something like that? –  Lee Jarvis Jul 16 '12 at 21:36
    
that is a getting closer. However, matt's answer is a little closer to what I am looking for. See my comment on his answer –  Andrew Jul 16 '12 at 22:57

How about using URLMap?

app = Rack::URLMap.new(
  "/path1" => Path1App.new,
  "/path2" => Path2App.new
)

run app
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure if I tried Rack::URLMap. Thanks! –  Andrew Dec 11 '13 at 19:01

I do this:

class MyApp 
  def call(env)
    @env = env

    # REQUEST_URI is still encoded; split before decoding to allow encoded slashes
    @path = env['REQUEST_URI'].split('/')

    # REQUEST_URI starts with a slash, so delete blank first element
    @path.delete_at(0)

    @path.each_index do |i|
      @path[i]= CGI.unescape(@path[i])
    end

    route()
  end
end

And then route() can do whatever it wants to route the request, e.g.:

class MyApp 
  def route
    m = @env['REQUEST_METHOD']
    @section = @path.shift

    if not @section
      home()
    elsif @section == 'route1' and m == 'GET'
      route1()
    # else ...
    end
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
I would recommend Rack::Request over splitting up the info yourself. It'll handle all the load and look much nicer. –  Lee Jarvis Jul 16 '12 at 21:30
    
@injekt Huh, I just looked through the docs and don't see how that would come into play here. I use it for the params() method when I need to process a query string or POST form data, but I don't see any methods that would help with parsing and routing the path... –  Darshan-Josiah Barber Jul 16 '12 at 21:41

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