Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Have a collection of objects. Schematically:

[
    { A = 1, B = 1 }
    { A = 1, B = 2 }
    { A = 2, B = 3 }
    { A = 2, B = 4 }
    { A = 1, B = 5 }
    { A = 3, B = 6 }
]

Need:

[
    { A = 1, Bs = [ 1, 2 ] }
    { A = 2, Bs = [ 3, 4 ] }
    { A = 1, Bs = [ 5 ] }
    { A = 3, Bs = [ 6 ] }
]

Is it possible to LINQ such?

Note: Ordering is important. So Bs = [5] can't be merged with Bs = [1, 2]

share|improve this question
    
What are the specific types involved? –  Mark Byers Jul 16 '12 at 21:34
3  
ordering is important? i.e. 5 should not be lumped in with 1 and 2? –  Wug Jul 16 '12 at 21:34
    
@MarkByers , doesn't matter. Any classes. –  Sergey Metlov Jul 16 '12 at 21:35
    
@Wug yes. That is why I couldn't use GroupBy –  Sergey Metlov Jul 16 '12 at 21:35
4  
You could probably write a complex version using Aggregate(), but you're probably better off writing this using a basic loop (and possibly capturing it in a custom extension method if you want to integrate it into a larger LINQ query.) –  dlev Jul 16 '12 at 21:40

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Given these simplistic classes:

class C {
  public int A;
  public int B;
}
class R {
  public int A;
  public List<int> Bs = new List<int>();
}

You can do it like this:

var cs = new C[] {
  new C() { A = 1, B = 1 },
  new C() { A = 1, B = 2 },
  new C() { A = 2, B = 3 },
  new C() { A = 2, B = 4 },
  new C() { A = 1, B = 5 },
  new C() { A = 3, B = 6 }
};

var rs = cs.
  OrderBy(o => o.B).
  ThenBy(o => o.A).
  Aggregate(new List<R>(), (l, o) => {
    if (l.Count > 0 && l.Last().A == o.A) {
      l.Last().Bs.Add(o.B);
    }
    else {
      l.Add(new R { A = o.A, Bs = { o.B } });
    }
    return l;
  });

Note: In the above I assume that the Bs and then the As have to be sorted. If that's not the case, it's a simple matter of removing the sorting instructions:

var rs = cs.
  Aggregate(new List<R>(), (l, o) => {
    if (l.Count > 0 && l.Last().A == o.A) {
      l.Last().Bs.Add(o.B);
    }
    else {
      l.Add(new R { A = o.A, Bs = { o.B } });
    }
    return l;
  });
share|improve this answer
    
Would this work if I replaced new C() { A = 1, B = 2 } with new C() { A = 1, B = 7 } ? –  L.B Jul 17 '12 at 0:13
    
@L.B: yes it does! –  Jordão Jul 17 '12 at 1:18
    
No, it returns 5 rows (In fact my comment was not a question, I had tested your code before commenting but obviously you didn't bother to test with this new sample) –  L.B Jul 17 '12 at 5:31
    
@L.B: I have tested it, and to me 5 rows was the answer. I was under the impression that the Bs had to be sorted before running it (and then the As). If that is not the case, just remove the sorting commands (OrderBy(o => o.B).ThenBy(o => o.A)) and you'll get your 4 rows. –  Jordão Jul 17 '12 at 12:51

So basically you want to group together what has the same A-value and is consecutive.

You need to tranform the list of objects to an anonymous type which contains the previous/next element. I've used two Selects to make it more redable. Then you need to check if the two elements are consecutive(adjacent indices). Now you have all you need to GroupBy, the value and the bool.

Your objects:

var list = new System.Collections.Generic.List<Foo>(){
    new Foo(){ A = 1, B = 1 },
    new Foo(){ A = 1, B = 2 },
    new Foo(){ A = 2, B = 3 },
    new Foo(){ A = 2, B = 4 },
    new Foo(){ A = 1, B = 5 },
    new Foo(){ A = 3, B = 6 }
};

The query:

var groups = list
    .Select((f, i) => new
    {
        Obj = f,
        Next = list.ElementAtOrDefault(i + 1),
        Prev = list.ElementAtOrDefault(i - 1)
    })
    .Select(x => new
    {
        A = x.Obj.A,
        x.Obj,
        Consecutive = (x.Next != null && x.Next.A == x.Obj.A)
                   || (x.Prev != null && x.Prev.A == x.Obj.A)
    })
    .GroupBy(x => new { x.Consecutive, x.A });

Output the result:

foreach (var abGroup in groups)
{
    int aKey = abGroup.Key.A;
    var bList = string.Join(",", abGroup.Select(x => x.Obj.B));
    Console.WriteLine("A = {0}, Bs = [ {1} ] ", aKey, bList);
}

Here's the working demo: http://ideone.com/fXgQ3

share|improve this answer

You can use The GroupAdjacent Extension Method .

Then , you just need

var grps = objects.GroupAdjacent(p => new { p.A });

I think it is the easiest way to implement it .

EDIT:

Here is my test code.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
       var ia = new Dummycls[] { 
           new Dummycls{ A = 1, B = 1 },
           new Dummycls{ A = 1, B = 2 },
           new Dummycls{ A = 2, B = 3 },
           new Dummycls{ A = 2, B = 4 },
           new Dummycls{ A = 1, B = 5 },
           new Dummycls{ A = 3, B = 6 },

       };
        var groups = ia.GroupAdjacent(i => i.A);
        foreach (var g in groups)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Group {0}", g.Key);
            foreach (var i in g)
                Console.WriteLine(i.ToString());
            Console.WriteLine();
        }

        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

class Dummycls
{
    public int A { get; set; }
    public int B { get; set; }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return string.Format("A={0};B={1}" , A , B);
    }
}

The result is

Group 1
A=1;B=1
A=1;B=2

Group 2
A=2;B=3
A=2;B=4

Group 1
A=1;B=5

Group 3
A=3;B=6
share|improve this answer
    
@Tim Schmelter It will return a collection of b not just only one b. I think you can write a simple sample. –  shenhengbin Jul 17 '12 at 10:07
    
You're right. Seem to work also: ideone.com/XsJzq –  Tim Schmelter Jul 17 '12 at 10:17

This is the structure of a method that does what you want:

public static IEnumerable<IGrouping<TKey, TElement>> GroupWithKeyBreaks<T, TKey, TElement>(IEnumerable<T> enumerable,
        Func<T, TKey> keySelector,
        Func<T, TElement> itemSelector)    
{
    // Error handling goes here
    TKey currentKey = default(TKey);
    List<TElement> elements = new List<TElement>();

    foreach (T element in enumerable)
    {
        TKey thisKey = keySelector(element);
        if (thisKey == null)
        {
            continue;
        }

        if (!thisKey.Equals(currentKey) && elements.Count > 0)
        {
            yield return new SimpleGrouping<TKey, TElement>(currentKey, elements);
            elements = new List<TElement>();
        }

        elements.Add(itemSelector(element));
        currentKey = thisKey;
     }

    // Add the "last" item
    if (elements.Count > 0)
    {
        yield return new SimpleGrouping<TKey, TElement>(currentKey, elements);
    }
}

It uses the following helper class:

private class SimpleGrouping<T, U> : IGrouping<T, U>
{
    private T key;
    private IEnumerable<U> grouping;

    T IGrouping<T, U>.Key
    {
        get { return key; }
    }

    IEnumerator<U> IEnumerable<U>.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return grouping.GetEnumerator();
    }

    System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return grouping.GetEnumerator();
    }

    public SimpleGrouping(T k, IEnumerable<U> g)
    {
        this.key = k;
        this.grouping = g;
    }
}

Here's a sample usage:

foreach (var grouping in data.GroupWithKeyBreaks(x => x.A, x => x.B))
{
    Console.WriteLine("Key: " + grouping.Key);
    foreach (var element in grouping)
    {
        Console.Write(element);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
var groupCounter = 0;
int? prevA = null;

collection
    .Select(item => { 
        var groupId = item.A == prevA ? groupCounter : ++groupCounter; 
        prevA = item.A;
        return new { groupId, item.A, item.B }; 
    })
    .GroupBy(item => item.groupId)
    .Select(grp => new { A = grp.First().A, Bs = grp.Select(g => g.B) });
share|improve this answer

If your collection is in o, then:

    var trans = o.Aggregate
    (
            new {
                List = new List<Tuple<int, List<int>>>(),
                            LastSeed = (int?)0
            },
            (acc, item) =>
            {
                if (acc.LastSeed == null || item.A != acc.LastSeed)
                    acc.List.Add(Tuple.Create(item.A, new List<int>()));
                acc.List[acc.List.Count - 1].Item2.Add(item.B);
                return new { List = acc.List, LastSeed = (int?)item.A};
            },
            acc => acc.List.Select(
                  z=>new {A = z.Item1,
                          B = z.Item2 as IEnumerable<int>
                         })
       );

This produces an IEnumerable<int, IEnumerable<int>> of the required form.

share|improve this answer
var result = list.ToKeyValuePairs(x => x.A)
                 .Select(x => new { A = x.Key, Bs = x.Value.Select(y => y.B) }); 

foreach (var item in result)
{
    Console.WriteLine("A = {0} Bs=[{1}]",item.A, String.Join(",",item.Bs));
}

-

public static class MyExtensions
{
    public static IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<S,IEnumerable<T>>> ToKeyValuePairs<T,S>(
            this IEnumerable<T> list, 
            Func<T,S> keySelector)
    {
        List<T> retList = new List<T>();
        S prev = keySelector(list.FirstOrDefault());
        foreach (T item in list)
        {
            if (keySelector(item).Equals(prev))
                retList.Add(item);
            else
            {
                yield return new KeyValuePair<S, IEnumerable<T>>(prev, retList);
                prev = keySelector(item);
                retList = new List<T>();
                retList.Add(item);
            }
        }
        if(retList.Count>0)
            yield return new KeyValuePair<S, IEnumerable<T>>(prev, retList);
    }
}

OUTPUT:

A = 1 Bs=[1,2]
A = 2 Bs=[3,4]
A = 1 Bs=[5]
A = 3 Bs=[6]
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.