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I have three files, the information in each does not overlap in any way - however, they need to be merged into each other in a particular way in order to be useful.

The first file is unique from the second two, which are set up in the same way. File 1 looks like this:

rs101   12  126890980   A   G   
rs102   4   114553253   A   C   
rs103   9   172776204   C   T

File 2 looks like this:

1   178 0.12    0.26    0.02    
1   1458    0.35    0.37    0.021   
1   318 0.99    0.105   0.08

File 3 looks like this:

 1  3567    0.78    0.67    0.005   
 0  0   0   0   0   
 1  3567    0.34    -0.15   0.001 

I would like a script that merges these to files to produce a third file:

rs101   12  126890980   A   G
1   178 0.12    0.26    0.02
1   3567    0.78    0.67    0.005
rs102   4   114553253   A   C   
1   1458    0.35    0.37    0.02
0   0   0   0   0
rs103   9   172776204   C   T
1   318 0.99    0.105   0.08
1   3567    0.34    -0.15   0.001 

The issue is that if these files are merged incorrectly they will not provide the correct information when run through analysis - I can add a unique column to the end of each file (for example, the rs# could be printed twice in file one (once in the first column, and once in a last column), and then the corresponding rs number could be added in another column at the end of files 2 and 3). Then I could manually spot check that the merge occurred correctly. Any insights or suggestions are appreciated!

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I wouldn't swear that you could never use sed to do that, but if I were confronted with this problem, I'd write a quick script in something like Python -- that's the most natural-looking tool for this job. –  Norman Gray Jul 16 '12 at 21:51

4 Answers 4

One way, using paste:

paste -d "\n" file1.txt file2.txt file3.txt

Results:

rs101   12  126890980   A   G   
1   178 0.12    0.26    0.02    
1  3567    0.78    0.67    0.005   
rs102   4   114553253   A   C   
1   1458    0.35    0.37    0.021   
0  0   0   0   0   
rs103   9   172776204   C   T
1   318 0.99    0.105   0.08
1  3567    0.34    -0.15   0.001

This assumes that each of your input files contain the same number of lines. To check each file (and thus avoid potential merging problems), use wc:

wc -l file1.txt file2.txt file3.txt

Results:

3 file1.txt
3 file2.txt
3 file3.txt
9 total

HTH

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This will be the shortest and simplest solution for this tast on a Unix box, exactly what paste was designed for. –  Prashant Kumar Jul 16 '12 at 23:23

Using Perl on the command line:

perl -e '
    @fh = map {open my $fh, $_; $fh} @ARGV;
    print map <$_>.'', @fh until grep eof, @fh;
' file1.txt file2.txt file3.txt
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One way using perl:

perl -e '
    open $fh1, q|<|, shift;
    open $fh2, q|<|, shift;
    open $fh3, q|<|, shift;
    while ( $l1 = <$fh1>, 
            $l2 = <$fh2>,
            $l3 = <$fh3> ) {
        printf qq|%s|, join qq||, $l1, $l2, $l3;
    }
' File1 File2 File3

Output:

rs101   12  126890980   A   G   
1   178 0.12    0.26    0.02    
1  3567    0.78    0.67    0.005   
rs102   4   114553253   A   C   
1   1458    0.35    0.37    0.021   
0  0   0   0   0   
rs103   9   172776204   C   T
1   318 0.99    0.105   0.08
1  3567    0.34    -0.15   0.001
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Using File Descriptors in shell -

while IFS= read -r lineA && IFS= read -r lineB <&3 && IFS= read -r lineC <&4 ; do   
echo "$lineA"; echo "$lineB"; echo "$lineC"
done <file1 3<file2 4<file3
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