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I have a vector of pointers to vectors:

main(...)
{
  //...
  std::vector< std::vector<double> * > ds = getDS(...)
  //...
}

std::vector<std::vector<double> * > getDS(int m, ...)
{
  std::vector<std::vector<double> * > wavefunctions = *(new std::vector<std::vector<double>*>(m));
  int n = int( params.rmax() / params.dr() );
  std::ifstream input_wf;
  input_wf.open(filename.c_str());
  input_wf.setf(std::ios::showpoint | std::ios::scientific);
  for(int i=0; i < nbasis; i++)
  {
    std::vector<double> *wf = new std::vector<double>(n);
    //(wavefunctions[i]) = new std::vector<double>(n);
    for (unsigned int ir=0; ir < wf->size(); ir++)
      input_wf >> ( *wf )[ir];
    wavefunctions.push_back(wf);
  }
  input_wf.close();
  return wave functions;
}

However, I keep getting a EXC_BAD_ACCESS error when I try to access wavefunctions[0]->at(some legal value) after going through the loop once, during debugging. (There should be something there, but I'm not sure why there isn't... Any ideas?

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3  
why wavefunctions = *(new std::vector<std::vector<double>*>(m)); instead of just wavefunctions(m)? –  Adam Jul 16 '12 at 22:36
5  
I would suggest using std::vector<std::vector<double> > instead. It will reduce the complexity of this code as well as properly release all memory when destructed. And a typedef would probably help compact the code a bit... –  cdhowie Jul 16 '12 at 22:38
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The following line,

  std::vector<std::vector<double> * > wavefunctions = *(new std::vector<std::vector<double>*>(m));

is problematic in your case for two reasons -

  1. It causes a memory leak, as the object created by new is copied into wavefunctions, and then the pointer to it is lost. This is not Java...
  2. It allocates m entries in your vector. Subsequent push_back's add to that m entries, so when you try to access wavefunctions[0] you actually access an entry which was created in this line, not the first one to be pushed in the for loop.

To solve the problem, change the line to

std::vector<std::vector<double> * > wavefunctions;
wavefunctions.reserve(m);

The reserve method makes sure you will not have reallocations during the push_back's.

As a last note, depending on the circumstenses, the compiler may or may not be able to optimize away the inherent copy of vectors that is performed on return from the function. To be sure, you might want to learn more about r-value references (&&) or simply return the vector by address (that is, as another parameter of type vector<...> * and return type void).

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So, I fixed that bug (I'm now allocating on the stack, and doing the reserve), however, when wavefunctions is created, it is created at 0xb0, and subsequent references to it can't be read (after going through the loop once, attempting to read wavefunctions[0] gives a Cannot access memory at address 0xb0 –  Andrew Spott Jul 16 '12 at 22:55
    
The key word is where applicable_; some versions of Visual Studio, for example, are unable to NRVO if there's more than one exit path of the function. Compilers have limitations at this part, which will force you to study each compiler you use. I guess that's one of the reasons for r-value references. –  user1071136 Jul 16 '12 at 22:58
    
@AndrewSpott: do you have the word new in your code anywhere? You probably shouldn't. –  Mooing Duck Jul 16 '12 at 22:59
    
@AndrewSpott It works for me - you'll have to be more specific. Edit your question with the current state of your question (as a separate section, to preserve the original one). Also, what does ds.size() return in main ? –  user1071136 Jul 16 '12 at 23:11
    
@AndrewSpott Also, what is nbasis ? –  user1071136 Jul 16 '12 at 23:12
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The code looks like it should work to me, but has far too much dynamic allocation. (Although you typo'd your return value.) user1071136 found the bugs.

Most of the time, you should never type delete, and almost never type new. You can also open a stream in it's constructor, and streams close themselves, you don't have to do that. You also forgot to check the stream state, to see if it read in any values.

std::vector<std::vector<double>> getDS(int m, ...)
{
  std::ifstream input_wf(filename.c_str());
  input_wf.setf(std::ios::showpoint | std::ios::scientific);

  int n = int( params.rmax() / params.dr() );
  std::vector<std::vector<double>> wavefunctions(m, std::vector<double>(n));
  //m by n vector is fully constructed, and ready to read!
  for(int i=0; input_wf && i<nbasis; i++)
  {
    for (unsigned int ir=0; input_wf  && ir<wf->size(); ir++)
      input_wf >> wavefunctions[i][ir];
  }
  if (!input_wf)
      throw std::runtime_error("improper data in the file!");
  return wavefunctions;
}
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pretty sure the return value doesn't match the return declaration in this, it isn't a vector of vectors but a vector of pointers to vectors... –  Andrew Spott Jul 16 '12 at 22:51
    
@AndrewSpott: I fixed it before I saw your comment –  Mooing Duck Jul 16 '12 at 22:58
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std::vector<std::vector<double> * > wavefunctions = *(new std::vector<std::vector<double>*>(m));

This looks suspect to me. I believe you mean to be doing one of two things.

Declare this on the stack and return a copy of it.

 std::vector<std::vector<double> * > wavefunctions;

Declare it on the heap and return a pointer from your function. (This makes the caller responsible for deleting the memory allocated.)

std::vector<std::vector<double> * > *wavefunctions = new std::vector<std::vector<double>*>(m);
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First, why are you maintaining a vector of pointers? There are almost no good reasons to do this (I can't think of one, but I don't know everything.) If you need to store pointers then store smart pointers. You are negating the vector's ability to manage memory for you.

std::vector<std::vector<double> * > wavefunctions = *(new std::vector<std::vector<double>*>(m));

Here you new up a vector, immediately dereference it and copy it to your local vector. There you have a memory leak because the new'd vector (and its pointer) is lost, you simply made a copy of it and threw it away. Again, storing pointers in a vector is a bad idea, and your allocation method is always wrong.

Just use a vector<vector<double> > and let the vector manage dynamic memory for you (though it would be good to do a bit more studying on the subject so that you understand what your code is doing.)

I am a bit hesitant to even say this, but performance issues can arise when using vectors to emulate a jagged array. The problem is one of locality of data, but this would only apply with tight loops in performance sensitive code and there are many factors which may render the point moot.

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