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So can you overload operators to handle objects in multiple classes (specifically private members.)

For example if I wanted == to check if a private member in Class A is equal to objects in a vector in Class B.

For example:

bool Book::operator==(const Book& check){
 return(((ISBN1 == check.ISBN1) && (ISBN2 == check.ISBN2) && (ISBN3 == check.ISBN3)
         && (ISBN4 == check.ISBN4)) || (title_ == check.title_));}

Everything in that overload is part of the Book class, however what if I wanted to do something like this.

 if(*this == bookcheckout[i])

with bookcheckout being part of a Library class. The == would fail in trying to compare title_ to a title_ stored in a vector of the Library class.

It's odd because I have the program doing the exact same thing in two different places, but in one place it's working and in the other it isn't.

Answered: had to have the function that the operator was in be a member function of the same class that the operator was a member function of

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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you make operator friend or member of one class, it will be able to access its private members. To access privates of both, operator will have to be free standing friend of both.

That is a bit unwieldy, so consider making public interface for interesting things instead.

(suppressed all puns about accessing private parts of multiple entities)

Here is how you can make a very friendly operator, but again, this is not a good solution.

(didn't compile the code)

class B;

class A
{
friend bool operator==(const A&, const B&);
private:
    int private_;
};

class B
{
friend bool operator==(const A&, const B&);
private:
    int private_;
};

bool operator==(const A& a, const B& b)
{
    return a.private_ == b.private_;
}   class B;

This is a better way -- just make public getters and use them in operator.

class A
{
public: 
   int GetPrivate() const { return private_; }
private:
    int private_;
};

class B
{
public:
    int GetPrivate() const { return private_; }
private:
    int private_;
};

bool operator==(const A& a, const B& b)
{
    return a.GetPrivate() == b.GetPrivate();
}

You also can make operator to be part of one of the classes, if you need privates from it alone. Read up on operator overloading syntax for more.

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How can I make an operator overload a freestanding friend of both? –  trikker Jul 20 '09 at 1:14
    
What about the public accessor method that Leonard described? –  trikker Jul 20 '09 at 1:28
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You don't specify the type of bookcheckout, so I can't be sure, but I think that your operator== will work without change.

For instance, if the code is:

class Library
{

public:
    const Book & operator[] (int i);
};

Library bookcheckout;

Then your if statement will call the operator== you have without a problem.

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bookcheckout is a library type –  trikker Jul 20 '09 at 1:37
    
Right, but bookcheckout[i] is a Book, right? –  Lou Franco Jul 20 '09 at 2:00
    
Yes, bookcheckout[i] is a Book. –  trikker Jul 20 '09 at 2:50
1  
This means that you don't need the friend declarations at all. The comparison is comparing two Books, one of which happens to be in a library. –  David Norman Jul 20 '09 at 3:38
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Yes. If you need to access private members, consider providing an appropriate public interface for them OR go for friend class. It is usually better to avoid it though. To handle a specific type, implement operator== with an instance of that type.

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What would be the syntax though for the operator overloading, I'll post an example of what I mean in the question. –  trikker Jul 20 '09 at 1:10
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You can, but you would need to make either 'bool operator==(A a, B a)' 'friend' of class A if you are using a free function or make class B 'friend' of class A if you implement the comparison operator as a class member function.

You can avoid the friendship requirement by providing a public accessor to the private member in class A

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And generally you should avoid it. The need to access private fields most likely indicates a design mistake. –  Tamás Szelei Jul 21 '09 at 1:51
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