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I've done quite a bit of searching on this topic and I can never seem to find a common answers to this. What do most developers use to create dispatching systems for things like emails, purchase orders, etc? For example, if I place an order on a website, after the transaction goes through, what kind of a service dispatches the order to the 3rd party company? This has to be some type of process that runs on the server and retries until it succeeds. If it's a Windows server, do these websites use a windows service with polling? Seems a little primitive these days, considering that almost all websites need this type of thing for placing orders. Also, what is used on Linux?

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2 Answers 2

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You might want to look at a queue based system such as ActiveMQ tied to a remote processing system (such as a SOAP Client).

You can use the SOAP Client to send in the request, if you get a response you ACK the ActiveMQ and its popped from the queue, if you don't then the item is kept in the queue for the next engine / processor to try with. Because of this approach you can have multiple agents which listen for the next message and work independently so scale easily.

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What's interesting is that almost every orders or subscription based website needs this feature, yet there's no standard, and the answers I get are people trying to figure out how to do it rather than telling me how their website does it. I just don't get it. –  u84six Jul 17 '12 at 21:36
    
Do people write a database polling application every time they need the feature? I took a look at the Apache Messaging system and while it has a lot of bells and whistles, it still doesn't seem suitable for small-scale websites. I guess every web developer writes a polling process. :) –  u84six Jul 17 '12 at 21:38

All there are many older technologies still been used like SOAP as John Mitchell suggested.

These days the most popular messaging services as you put it is over standard http (https for when more secure connection is required) using api.

Typically these api's use the json data format although some also support other formats like xml.

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