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I'm trying to establish a SerialPort connection which transfers 16 bit data packages at a rate of 10-20 kHz. Im programming this in C++/CLI. The sender just enters an infinte while-loop after recieving the letter "s" and constantly sends 2 bytes with the data.

A Problem with the sending side is very unlikely, since a more simple approach works perfectly but too slow (in this approach, the reciever sends always an "a" first, and then gets 1 package consisting of 2 bytes. It leads to a speed of around 500Hz). Here is the important part of this working but slow approach:

public: SerialPort^ port;

in main:
Parity p = (Parity)Enum::Parse(Parity::typeid, "None");
StopBits s = (StopBits)Enum::Parse(StopBits::typeid, "1");
port = gcnew SerialPort("COM16",384000,p,8,s);
port->Open();

and then doing as often as wanted:
port->Write("a");
int i = port->ReadByte();
int j = port->ReadByte();

This is now the actual approach im working with:

static int values[1000000];
static int counter = 0;

void reader(void)
    {
        SerialPort^ port;
        Parity p = (Parity)Enum::Parse(Parity::typeid, "None");
        StopBits s = (StopBits)Enum::Parse(StopBits::typeid, "1");
        port = gcnew SerialPort("COM16",384000,p,8,s);
        port->Open();
        unsigned int i = 0;
        unsigned int j = 0;
        port->Write("s"); //with this command, the sender starts to send constantly
        while(true)
        {
            i = port->ReadByte();
            j = port->ReadByte();
            values[counter] = j + (i*256);
            counter++;
        }
    }

in main:
Thread^ readThread = gcnew Thread(gcnew ThreadStart(reader));
readThread->Start();

The counter increases (much more) rapidly at a rate of 18472 packages/s, but the values are somehow wrong. Here is an example: The value should look like this, with the last 4 bits changing randomly (its a signal of an analogue-digital converter):

111111001100111 

Here are some values of the threaded solution given in the code:

1110011001100111 
1110011000100111 
1110011000100111 
1110011000100111

So it looks like the connection reads the data in the middle of the package (to be exact: 3 bits too late). What can i do? I want to avoid a solution where this error is fixed later in the code while reading the packages like this, because I don't know if the the shifting error gets worse when I edit the reading code later, which I will do most likely.

Thanks in advance,

Nikolas

PS: If this helps, here is the code of the sender-side (an AtMega168), written in C.

uint8_t activate = 0;

void uart_puti16(uint16_t val) //function that writes the data to serial port
{

    while ( !( UCSR0A & (1<<UDRE0)) ) //wait until serial port is ready
            nop(); // wait 1 cycle
            UDR0 = val >> 8; //write first byte to sending register
    while ( !( UCSR0A & (1<<UDRE0)) ) //wait until serial port is ready
            nop(); // wait 1 cycle
            UDR0 = val & 0xFF; //write second byte to sending register
}

in main:
while(1)
{
        if(active == 1)
        {   
            uart_puti16(read()); //read is the function that gives a 16bit data set
        }               
}

ISR(USART_RX_vect) //interrupt-handler for a recieved byte
{
        if(UDR0 == 'a') //if only 1 single data package is requested
        {
            uart_puti16(read());
        }
        if(UDR0 == 's') //for activating constant sending
        {
            active = 1;
        }
        if(UDR0 == 'e') //for deactivating constant sending
        {
            active = 0;
        }
}
share|improve this question
    
What prevents counter++ from overrunning the values[] array? –  sarnold Jul 16 '12 at 23:33
    
Nothing. I close the program before this case occurs :) This is just for testing purposes, the final program won't include something like this. –  user1530242 Jul 16 '12 at 23:41
    
Hehehe, okay, just be sure to fix that before shipment... :) –  sarnold Jul 16 '12 at 23:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

At the given bit rate of 384,000 you should get 38,400 bytes of data (8 bits of real data plus 2 framing bits) per second, or 19,200 two-byte values per second.

How fast is counter increasing in both instances? I would expect any modern computer to keep up with that rate whether using events or directly polling.

You do not show your simpler approach which is stated to work. I suggest you post that.

Also, set a breakpoint at the line

values[counter] = j + (i*256);

There, inspect i and j. Share the values you see for those variables on the very first iteration through the loop.

share|improve this answer
    
Ill do that right now, give me a sec. –  user1530242 Jul 16 '12 at 23:45
    
The speed is now given, see edited version. Rest follows asap. –  user1530242 Jul 16 '12 at 23:55
    
Working code given. Now im trying to post my values for i and j. –  user1530242 Jul 17 '12 at 0:03
    
Just found out that only the counter-position is zero while reading it, counter-1 has values. However, the values are wrong. Looks like it starts reading at the wrong position, so it starts reading in the middle of the package and the missing rest is 0. –  user1530242 Jul 17 '12 at 0:11
    
If you're getting values now but they look wrong, double-check your parity and stop bit settings. If you can provide more details about exactly how things are off, we might be able to help further. –  Eric J. Jul 17 '12 at 0:16

This is a guess based entirely on reading the code at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.io.ports.serialport.datareceived.aspx#Y228. With this caveat out of the way, here's my guess:

Your event handler is being called when data is available to read -- but you are only consuming two bytes of the available data. Your event handler may only be called every 1024 bytes. Or something similar. You might need to consume all the available data in the event handler for your program to continue as expected.

Try to re-write your handler to include a loop that reads until there is no more data available to consume.

share|improve this answer
    
As I said, this is based on a guess. If this isn't it, please let me know so I can delete my answer. –  sarnold Jul 16 '12 at 23:46
    
Good point, though it does not explain why the array is 0. Every time the event handler fires he would take two bytes of the available data, update the array, and increment counter once. –  Eric J. Jul 16 '12 at 23:47
    
@Eric: oh, good point. :/ At least the first value should be different... –  sarnold Jul 16 '12 at 23:48
    
Still there's merit to what you said... he may need to consume all available data once this initial issue is resolved. –  Eric J. Jul 16 '12 at 23:48
    
Thats why i included this line: port->ReceivedBytesThreshold = 2; ... so every 2 bytes the handler is called. –  user1530242 Jul 16 '12 at 23:56

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