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According to Java specification, the size of a char data type is 16 bits or two bytes.

So, I have the written following code:

private static final int BUFFER_SIZE=1024;
char[] buffer=new char[BUFFER_SIZE];
BufferedReader br= new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(conn.getInputStream()));

while (true){
    byteFromStream=in.read(buffer);
    if (byteFromStream==-1) break;
    totalBytesLoaded=totalBytesLoaded+byteFromStream*2;
}

But for some strange reason I am reading more bytes then is available on the stream, according to the specification of read() return numbers of characters actually read by stream.

Oh, I am getting total stream size by

bytesTotal=conn.getContentLength();

Which is working pretty fine as I myself uploaded files on the server and I know their sizes.

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The method returns the amount of read characters. That value does not need to be multiplied by 2, especially since you cannot make that general assumption about the byte size of a character from a stream.

The amount of bytes per character depends on the character encoding (it can be 1 byte for example). The reader component knows that and only tells you the amount of read characters.

share|improve this answer
    
In the provided link, read() is overloaded for read(char[] buff). – ardentsonata Jul 16 '12 at 23:52
    
@NoBu Games would you please explain little bit : "The amount of bytes per character depends on the character encoding (it can be 1 byte for example). The reader component knows that and only tells you the amount of read characters." – minhaz Jul 16 '12 at 23:54
    
@NoBu Games Do you have any JLS link for your comment? I want read more about this. Thanks – minhaz Jul 16 '12 at 23:57
    
InputStreamReader is set up with a character encoding, UTF-8 for example, which is the perfect example because its characters have variable width. It supports the set of ASCII characters for backwards compatibility reasons (1 byte per character) and on top of that international characters by using more than 1 byte per character. The Wikipedia article explains that in great detail. What you may want to try is subtracting InputStream.available value from the total byte count (even though it may not work in all cases) – tiguchi Jul 17 '12 at 0:05

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