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I would like to extract some information from a string in Ruby by only reading the String once (O(n) time complexity).

Here is an example:

The string looks like this: -location here -time 7:30pm -activity biking

I have a Ruby object I want to populate with this info. All the keywords are known, and they are all optional.

def ActivityInfo
  _attr_reader_ :location, :time, :activity

  def initialize(str)
    @location, @time, @activity = DEFAULT_LOCATION, DEFAULT_TIME, DEFAULT_ACTIVITY

    # Here is how I was planning on implementing this
    current_string = ""
    next_parameter = nil # A reference to keep track of which parameter the current string is refering to
    words = str.split
    while !str.empty?
      word = str.shift
      case word
      when "-location"
        if !next_parameter.nil?
          next_parameter.parameter = current_string # Set the parameter value to the current_string
          current_string = ""
        else
        next_parameter = @location
      when "-time"
        if !next_parameter.nil?
          next_parameter.parameter = current_string
          current_string = ""
        else
        next_parameter = @time
      when "-activity"
        if !next_parameter.nil?
          next_parameter.parameter = current_string
          current_string = ""
        else
        next_parameter = @time
      else
        if !current_string.empty?
          current_string += " "
        end
        current_string += word
      end
    end
  end   
end

So basically I just don't know how to make a variable be the reference of another variable or method, so that I can then set it to a specific value. Or maybe there is just another more efficient way to achieve this?

Thanks!

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1  
Why don't you just pass your parameters as an options hash? –  CodeGnome Jul 16 '12 at 23:57
1  
Looks like you're trying to define a class, but instead defined a nested method. –  the Tin Man Jul 17 '12 at 0:15
3  
If this is for command line arguments, there are lots of great libraries that will do a fantastic job parsing them for you. –  Andrew Marshall Jul 17 '12 at 3:22
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The string looks suspiciously like a command-line, and there are some good Ruby modules to parse those, such as optparse.

Assuming it's not, here's a quick way to parse the commands in your sample into a hash:

cmd = '-location here -time 7:30pm -activity biking'
Hash[*cmd.scan(/-(\w+) (\S+)/).flatten]

Which results in:

{
    "location" => "here",
        "time" => "7:30pm",
    "activity" => "biking"
}

Expanding it a bit farther:

class ActivityInfo
  def initialize(h)
    @location = h['location']
    @time     = h['time'    ]
    @activity = h['activity']
  end
end
act = ActivityInfo.new(Hash[*cmd.scan(/-(\w+) (\S+)/).flatten])

Which sets act to an instance of ActivityInfo looking like:

#<ActivityInfo:0x101142df8
    @activity = "biking",
    @location = "here",
    @time = "7:30pm"
>

--

The OP asked how to deal with situations where the commands are not flagged with - or are multiple words. These are equivalent, but I prefer the first stylistically:

irb(main):003:0> cmd.scan(/-((?:location|time|activity)) \s+ (\S+)/x)
[
    [0] [
        [0] "location",
        [1] "here"
    ],
    [1] [
        [0] "time",
        [1] "7:30pm"
    ],
    [2] [
        [0] "activity",
        [1] "biking"
    ]
]

irb(main):004:0> cmd.scan(/-(location|time|activity) \s+ (\S+)/x)
[
    [0] [
        [0] "location",
        [1] "here"
    ],
    [1] [
        [0] "time",
        [1] "7:30pm"
    ],
    [2] [
        [0] "activity",
        [1] "biking"
    ]
]

If the commands are multiple words, such as "at location":

irb(main):009:0> cmd = '-at location here -time 7:30pm -activity biking'
"-at location here -time 7:30pm -activity biking"
irb(main):010:0> 
irb(main):011:0* cmd.scan(/-((?:at \s location|time|activity)) \s+ (\S+)/x)
[
    [0] [
        [0] "at location",
        [1] "here"
    ],
    [1] [
        [0] "time",
        [1] "7:30pm"
    ],
    [2] [
        [0] "activity",
        [1] "biking"
    ]
]

If you need even more flexibility look at Ruby's strscan module. You can use that to tear apart a string and find the commands and their parameters.

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2  
I think you mean optparse (ruby-doc.org/stdlib-1.9.3/libdoc/optparse/rdoc/…). argparse is a Python library. –  user24359 Jul 17 '12 at 0:27
    
You're right. I've had my head in both Python and Ruby lately. Stuff's leaking out every direction now. –  the Tin Man Jul 17 '12 at 15:56
    
Thanks, that's exactly what I would like to do. One more question though, what regex can I use if the arguments are not single words? What I would like, is for the value of the argument to be any string until another argument keyword is matched (the argument keyword does not have to start with a -). I tried using something like this /(-location|-time|-actvity) (.*?) (?:-location|-time|-actvity)/, but that includes the next keyword into the previous expression. –  nbarraille Jul 17 '12 at 16:31
    
It depends on the entire format of the command line. I'll add some more examples for possible ways to deal with it. –  the Tin Man Jul 18 '12 at 19:14
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Convert String to Options Hash

If you just want easy access to your flags and their values, you can split your string into a hash where each flag is a key. For example:

options = Hash[ str.scan /-(\w+)\s+(\S+)/ ]
=> {"location"=>"here", "time"=>"7:30pm", "activity"=>"biking"}

You can then reference values directly (e.g. options['location']) or iterate through your hash in key/value pairs. For example:

options.each_pair { |k, v| puts "%s %s" % [k, v] }

A Dash of Metaprogramming

Okay, this is serious over-engineering, but I spent a little extra time on this question because I found it interesting. I'm not claiming the following is useful; I'm just saying it was fun for me to do.

If you want to parse your option flags and and dynamically create a set of attribute readers and set some instance variables without having to define each flag or variable separately, you can do this with a dash of metaprogramming.

# Set attribute readers and instance variables dynamically
# using Kernel#instance_eval.
class ActivityInfo
  def initialize(str)
    options = Hash[ str.scan /-(\w+)\s+(\S+)/ ]
    options.each_pair do |k, v|
      self.class.instance_eval { attr_reader k.to_sym }
      instance_variable_set("@#{k}", v)
    end
  end
end

ActivityInfo.new '-location here -time 7:30pm -activity biking'
=> #<ActivityInfo:0x00000001b49398
 @activity="biking",
 @location="here",
 @time="7:30pm">

Honestly, I think setting your variables explicitly from an options hash such as:

@activity = options['activity']`

will convey your intent more clearly (and be more readable), but it's always good to have alternatives. Your mileage may vary.

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Why reinvent the wheel when Thor can do the heavy lifting for you?

class ActivityInfo < Thor

  desc "record", "record details of your activity"
  method_option :location, :type => :string,   :aliases => "-l", :required => true
  method_option :time,     :type => :datetime, :aliases => "-t", :required => true
  method_option :activity, :type => :string,   :aliases => "-a", :required => true
  def record
    location = options[:location]
    time = options[:time]
    activity = options[:activity]

    # record details of the activity
  end

end

The options will be parse for you based on the datatype you specified. You can invoke it programmatically:

task = ActivityInfo.new([], {location: 'NYC', time: Time.now, activity: 'Chilling out'})
task.record

Or from command line: thor activity_info:record -l NYC -t "2012-06-23 02:30:00" -a "Chilling out"

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