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In Ruby, I'm trying to create a class, which based on a value given during initialization will inherit from one of the following modules. I would like to make a base module that both these modules inherit from that contain common methods that use constants defined in the modules that inherit it. Example:

module BaseMod
  def what_am_i
    puts OUTPUT
  end
end

module Tall
  OUTPUT = "I am tall"
  include BaseMod
end

module Short
  OUTPUT = "I am short"
  include BaseMod
end

class Person
  def initialize type
    if type =~ /short/i
      extend Short
    else
      extend Tall
    end
  end
end

p = Person.new "short"
p.what_am_i

My issue is that when "p.what_am_i" is called I get the following error:

NameError: uninitialized constant BaseMod::OUTPUT
  const_missing at org/jruby/RubyModule.java:2642
      what_am_i at test_logic2.rb:3
         (root) at test_logic2.rb:28

I'm also wondering if there's a better way to go about doing this.

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4 Answers 4

module BaseMod
  def what_am_i
    puts self.class::OUTPUT
  end
end

module Tall
  OUTPUT = "I am tall"
  include BaseMod
end

module Short
  OUTPUT = "I am short"
  include BaseMod
end

class Person
  def initialize(type)
    if type =~ /short/i
      self.class.send(:include, Short)
    else
      self.class.send(:include, Tall)
    end
  end
end

p = Person.new "short"
p.what_am_i

Edit: The code above doesn't actually work:

p = Person.new "short"
p.what_am_i
>> I am short
p = Person.new "tall"
p.what_am_i
>> I am tall
p = Person.new "short"
p.what_am_i
>> I am tall

Here is another attempt:

module BaseMod
  def self.included(base)
    base.send(:define_method, :what_am_i) do
      puts base::OUTPUT
    end
  end
end

module Tall
  OUTPUT = "I am tall"
  include BaseMod
end

module Short
  OUTPUT = "I am short"
  include BaseMod
end

class Person
  def initialize type
    if type =~ /short/i
      extend Short
    else
      extend Tall
    end
  end
end

p = Person.new "short"
p.what_am_i
p = Person.new "tall"
p.what_am_i
p = Person.new "short"
p.what_am_i
share|improve this answer
    
Nice trick, thanks. But personally, as a design choice, I'd still avoid using constants in cases like this. –  Boris Stitnicky Jul 18 '12 at 3:26
    
I could see it either way. The constants are appropriate from the perspective of the Tall and Short modules. The constant is weird from the perspective of Person, but that's not where the what_am_i method should live anyway. In any case, my code doesn't work right, so I added another solution. –  Avilyn Jul 20 '12 at 14:36
    
I see. I didn't try it, so I haven't noticed it didn't work :) –  Boris Stitnicky Jul 22 '12 at 16:18

To get the constant in your situation you have to write something like this:

module Tall
 ::OUTPUT = "I am tall"
 include BaseMod
end

However notice that you are redefining the Constant with declaration of the module Short. For that you will always get "I am short".

So to to do it correctly you should try:

module BaseMod
 OUTPUT="Before"
 def what_am_i
  puts OUTPUT
 end
end

module Tall
 def self.extended(k)
  OUTPUT.replace  "I am tall"
 end
 include BaseMod
end

module Short
 def self.extended(k)
  OUTPUT.replace "I am short"
 end
 include BaseMod
end

K

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I'm going to bring one more option to the table. I'm not quite sure what your complex, real-world case is, so here's my choice:

module BaseMod
  def what_am_i
    puts output
  end
end

module Tall
  include BaseMod
  def self.extended klass
    define_method :output do
      "I am tall"
    end
  end
end

module Short
  include BaseMod
  def self.extended klass
    define_method :output do
      "I am short"
    end
  end
end

class Person
  def initialize type
    extend (type =~ /short/i ? Short : Tall ) # Because I didn't wanna type all those lines
  end
end

p = Person.new "short"
p.what_am_i

Please note that for this situation, you could just as easily do this:

module Tall
  include BaseMod
  def output
    "I am tall"
  end
end

But I don't know if that would really help you.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting way of doing that. –  Boris Stitnicky Jul 18 '12 at 3:26
    
@BorisStitnicky depending on what you want to build, a method may make more sense than an instance variable. YMMV :) –  Trevoke Jul 18 '12 at 13:35

It seems that when you message your person p with #what_am_i message, the interpreter looks for the method implementation successively higher and higher in the class ancestors, and finally finds it in BaseMod, but at that level, OUTPUT constant is not defined anymore. So I think Ruby continues looking for OUTPUT constant going upwards in hierarchy, but does not think about looking downwards, in the Tall and Short modules where it is defined. The morale is, that even if you include a lot of submodules, they do not come into one heap where all the constants are accessible to everyone, but instead they keep their hierarchy in the reverse order of their inclusion (see Tall.Ancestors). At any level, only same level or higher level constants are accessible. I would solve your problem in the following way:

module Personhood
  def what_am_i; @output end
end

class Tall
  include Personhood
    def initialize
      @output = "I am tall"
    end
  end
end

class Short
  include Personhood
    def initialize
      @output = "I am short"
    end
  end
end

def Person( type )
  if type =~ /short/i
    Short.new
  else
    Tall.new
  end
end

pete = Person "short"
pete.what_am_i
=> I am short

I disposed of a constant in favor of instance variables. In Ruby, there are no real constants anyway. Tall and Short are made classes and Person is made a constructor method, which returns Tall or Short class depending on its input. That's how I feel it should be done.

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