Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have written some custom validation for some Entity Framework objects using IValidatableObject and I have added some DataAnnotations to the objects for validation.

I wanted to test that validation is meeting the required validation (ensuring that the custom validation is working and that any changes made keep those Data Annotations etc...) but I can't determine how to run the validation in the unit test without calling SaveChanges (which I don't want to do as if there is an issue and validation doesn't work it would write to the data source)

I wanted to do something like this:

[TestMethod]
public void InvalidStartDate_StartDateAfterEndDate()
{
   var header = new Header()
                    {
                        StartDate = DateTime.Now.AddDays(15),
                        EndDate = DateTime.Now.AddDays(-15)
                    };
   var actual = header.IsValid();
   var expected = false;
   Assert.AreEqual(expected, actual);
}

Or something like

[TestMethod]
public void InvalidStartDate_StartDateAfterEndDate()
{
   var header = new Header()
                    {
                        StartDate = DateTime.Now.AddDays(15),
                        EndDate = DateTime.Now.AddDays(-15)
                    };
   var actual = header.GetValidationErrors().Count;
   var expected = 0;
   Assert.AreEqual(expected, actual);
}

But can't seem to find a way of getting the validation to run without calling save changes, is there a way to do this?

share|improve this question
    
db.GetValidationErrors() should work.. can you post the code for your Header class? –  Luxspes Jul 17 '12 at 0:53

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can invoke the Validator to validate the object.

[TestMethod]
public void InvalidStartDate_StartDateAfterEndDate()
{
   var header = new Header()
                    {
                        StartDate = DateTime.Now.AddDays(15),
                        EndDate = DateTime.Now.AddDays(-15)
                    };

   var context = new ValidationContext(header, null, null);
   var results = new List<ValidationResult>();

   var actual = Validator.TryValidateObject(header, context, results);
   var expected = false;

   Assert.AreEqual(expected, actual);
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.