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First off, I'm following the practice found here for Rails concerns (great idea!): https://gist.github.com/1014971

I'm getting an error though:

undefined method `search' for #<Class:0x5c25ea0>
app/controllers/accessories_controller.rb:6:in `index'

I DO have my /app/models/concerns/ directory loaded in /config/application.rb. So the "concern" modules ARE being loaded. Just wanted to point that out.

Here is my code:

/app/models/concerns/searchable.rb

module Searchable
  extend ActiveSupport::Concern

  # Add a "search" scope to the models
  def self.search (search)
    if search
      where('name LIKE ?', "%#{search}%")
    else
      scoped
    end
  end
end

/app/models/accessory.rb

class Accessory < ActiveRecord::Base
  include Searchable

  ...
end

/app/controllers/accessories_controller.rb

class AccessoriesController < ApplicationController

  def index
    @accessories  = Accessory.search(params[:search])

    ...
  end

end
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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Well, with a little more toying around I figured out what is wrong!

When you're wanting to directly modify the Model from within the Module (concern), you need to wrap the functionality inside an included block.

I've changed my concern module to the following:

    module Searchable
        extend ActiveSupport::Concern

        included do
            # Add a "search" scope to the models
            def self.search (search)
                if search
                    where('name LIKE ?', "%#{search}%")
                else
                    scoped
                end
            end
        end

    end

That is it! Hopefully this will help someone else with the same quesion!

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Good that you figured it out by yourself! A couple more tips: You shouldn't put a space between the method definition and the arguments for the method. It's just not done that way in the Ruby world. Now with regards to the included method, what that'll do is evaluate that whole block within the context of the class. If you want to define methods for the class, I would recommend just defining the methods on the module itself, rather than wrapping them inside the included block as well. –  Ryan Bigg Jul 17 '12 at 1:38
    
Thanks for the reminder about the method name. My own "best practices" sometimes slip in here and there every now and then. I understand what you're saying about the included block. If I were defining a non-self method, I would put it outside the block. Thanks! –  Wes Foster Jul 17 '12 at 10:41

That's a decent solution but not really the best solution. When you build a module on ActiveSupport::Concern you can wrap a module called ClassMethods inside your concern and any module that includes your concern will automatically be extended with the ClassMethods module.

A better solution, then, would be:

module Searchable
  extend ActiveSupport::Concern

  module ClassMethods
    def search(search)
      if search
        where('name LIKE ?', "%#{search}%")
      else
        scoped
      end
    end
  end
end

That (IMO) more clearly expresses your intent: placing a class-level method into the class.

While your approach works, the included method is better used when you need to invoke methods on the calling class. For example, you could insist that your Searchable objects have a db-backed name attribute as shown below. The included method is adding the presence validator to the calling class, and the methods you are using to extend the class are clearly separated.

module Searchable
  extend ActiveSupport::Concern

  def self.included(base)
    base.send :validates_presence_of, :name
  end

  module ClassMethods
    def search(search)
      if search
        where('name LIKE ?', "%#{search}%")
      else
        scoped
      end
    end
  end
end
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As AndyV points out, the correct solution is this:

module Searchable
  extend ActiveSupport::Concern

  module ClassMethods
    def search(search)
      if search
        where('name LIKE ?', "%#{search}%")
      else
        scoped
      end
    end
  end
end

And not defining self.search in the included block as you are doing in your solution, which is more verbose and less explicit.

But I disagree with AndyV in the usage of self.included. If you use ActiveSupport::Concern, that's to have the included block syntactic sugar, so you should be using it. I only rely on self.included when the order of the methods I call or the methods I define matters.

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