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I have this query:

(from a in SickDays
    join b in Class.Where(p => p.ID == myId) on a.Class_ID equals b.ID
    join c in Student on a.Student_ID equals c.ID
    group a by new { c.Name, c.Order } into ac
    select new { Count = ac.Count(), Name = ac.Key.Name, Order = ac.Key.Order }
).OrderBy(f => f.Order)

This returns:

Count | Name | Order
    3 | Dave |     a
    2 | John |     b
    7 | Sally|     c

However I'd like it to return this:

Count | Name | Order
    3 | Dave |     a
    2 | John |     b
    7 | Sally|     c
    0 | Mark |     d
    0 | Betty|     e

UPDATE: This is what Students, Classes and SickDays look like using @sixlettervariables example:

var Students = new List<Student>()
{
    new Student { Id = 1, Name = "Al", Order = 'a' },
    new Student { Id = 2, Name = "Betty", Order = 'b' },
    new Student { Id = 3, Name = "Charles", Order = 'c' },
};

var Classes = new List<Class>()
{
    new Class { Id = 1, Title = "A100" },
    new Class { Id = 2, Title = "A200" },
};

var SickDays = new List<SickDay>()
{
    new SickDay { Id = 1, StudentId = 1, ClassId = 1 },
    new SickDay { Id = 2, StudentId = 1, ClassId = 1 },
    new SickDay { Id = 3, StudentId = 1, ClassId = 2 },
    new SickDay { Id = 4, StudentId = 1, ClassId = 2 },
    new SickDay { Id = 5, StudentId = 2, ClassId = 1 },
};

Ok the above is now correct, so sorry for the confusion!

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Wait! I've confused myself with the 'Update'. I've used Students, Classes and SickDays as an example, but my application uses different objects - bare with me a few minutes while I sort out precisely what Students, Classes and SickDays look like. –  Dean Jul 17 '12 at 3:11
    
Ok now it's correct...again I'm really sorry –  Dean Jul 17 '12 at 3:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is known as a Left Outer Join. In this case, every Student is required even if they have no Sick Days. So, we would start with the students, perform a left outer join with the sick days, and then return the count of the classes which matched the ID you had specified:

var query =
    from s in Students
    join d in SickDays on s.ID equals d.Student_ID into gj
    from sd in gj.DefaultIfEmpty()
    group sd by new { s.Name, s.Order } into gg
    select
        new
        {
            Name = gg.Key.Name,
            Order = gg.Key.Order,
            Count = gg.Count(x => x != null && x.Class_ID == myId)
        };
share|improve this answer
    
    
Just to let you know, @sixlettervariables, I'm still testing your solution –  Dean Jul 17 '12 at 3:17
    
You champion, it works! Even when I was confused over my own question you understood it :-) Thanks so much! –  Dean Jul 17 '12 at 3:29
    
You're welcome, you could extend this approach to see exactly which classes each student missed by swapping Count out for Missed = gg.ToArray() and then using Missed.Count() instead in code. –  user7116 Jul 17 '12 at 3:45

So you want all the students even if they aren't in the class? Then you need a left join I believe. with Linq this is achieved using DefaultIfEmpty()

Try this?

(from a in SickDays
    join b in Class.Where(p => p.ID == myId) on a.Class_ID equals b.ID
    join c in Student on a.Student_ID equals c.ID
        into s
    from students in s.DefaultIfEmpty()
    group a by new { students.Name, students.Order } into ac
    select new { Count = ac.Count(), Name = ac.Key.Name, Order = ac.Key.Order }
).OrderBy(f => f.Order)

I hope that gets you in the right direction.

share|improve this answer
1  
It's not the student that is missing, but rather the sick day. –  user7116 Jul 17 '12 at 1:48

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