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I'm writing in C and compiling with GCC.

is there a better way of declaring points. I was surprised to see that points was an array. Is there some way of declaring points so it looks more like an array.

typedef struct Span
{
    unsigned long lo;
    unsigned long hi;
} Span;

typedef struct Series
{
    unsigned long *points;
    unsigned long count;
    unsigned long limit;
} Series;

void SetSpanSeries(Series *self, const Span *src)
{
    unsigned long *points;

    if (src->lo < src->hi )
    {

        // Overlays second item in series.
        points = self->points;  // a pointer in self structure
        points[0] = src->lo;
        points[1] = src->hi;
        self->count = 1;
    }
}

Now lets say that points points to a structure that is an array.

typedef struct Span
{
    unsigned long lo;
    unsigned long hi;
} Span;


span *points[4];

now how do I write these lines of code? Did I get this right?

points = self->points;  // a pointer in self structure
points[0].lo = src->lo;
points[0].hi = src->hi;
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2  
Try to avoid pasting tabs into the code blocks. They tend to mess up the formatting. –  Mysticial Jul 17 '12 at 2:42
1  
+1 because my answer ended up being much longer than I thought it would need to be. –  Chris Lutz Jul 17 '12 at 2:51
    
The tabs acted a little bit odd when I copied them. I'll have to get rid of tabs next time. –  historystamp Jul 17 '12 at 3:14
    
No, given the declaration unsigned long *points;, points is not an array. It's a pointer (because you declared it that way). It may happen to point to the first element of an array. Strongly suggested reading: section 6 of the comp.lang.c FAQ. –  Keith Thompson Jul 17 '12 at 3:56
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

With the declaration unsigned long *points, points is a pointer. It points to the beginning of an array. arr[x] is the same as *(arr + x), so whether arr is an array (in which case, it takes the address of the array, adds x, and dereferences the 'pointer') or a pointer (in which case, it takes the pointer value, adds x, and dereferences the pointer), arr[0] still gets the same array access.

In this case, you can't declare points as an array because you're not using it as an array - you're using it as a pointer, which points to an array. A pointer is a shallow copy - if you change the data pointed to by a pointer, it changes the original data. To create a regular array, you'd need to do a deep copy, which would prevent your changes in pointer from affecting the array self, which is ultimately what you want.

In fact, you could rewrite the whole thing without points:

void SetSpanSeries(Series *self, const Span *src)
{
    if (src->lo < src->hi )
    {
        self->points[0] = src->lo;
        self->points[1] = src->hi;
        self->count = 1;
    }
}

As to your second example, yes, points[0].lo is correct. points->lo would also be correct, so long as you're only accessing points[0]. (Or self->points[0].lo if you take out points entirely.)

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58 seconds faster and more eloquent. Nice. :) –  sarnold Jul 17 '12 at 2:52
    
"It points to an array" - strictly it points to the first element of the array. This is the same address in memory as the array, but a pointer-to-array is a different type from a pointer-to-an-element-of-that-array. Usually you can conflate the two without causing trouble, but a beginner still needs to know that they're two different things. –  Steve Jessop Jul 17 '12 at 7:22
    
@SteveJessop - I haven't done programming in a while due to trying to graduate, my pedantry is a bit rusty. Fixing. –  Chris Lutz Jul 17 '12 at 18:15
    
Thanks you explanation helped be a lot. –  historystamp Jul 17 '12 at 23:33
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The ability to treat a pointer as an array definitely confuses most C beginners. Arrays even decay to pointers when passed as arguments to functions, giving the impression that arrays and pointers are completely interchangeable -- they aren't. An excellent description is in Expert C Programming: Deep C Secrets. (This is one of my favorite books; it's strongly recommended if you intend to understand C.)

Anyway, writing pointer[2] is the same as *(pointer+2) -- the array syntax is far easier for most people to read (and write).

Since you are using this *points variable to provide easier access to another block of memory (the pointer points in the struct Series), you cannot use an array for your local variable because you cannot re-assign the base of an array to something else. Consider the following illegal code:

int foo[10];
int *bar;
int wrong[10];

bar = foo; /* fine */
wrong = foo; /* compile error -- cannot assign to the array 'wrong' */

Another option for re-writing this code is to remove the temporary variable:

if (src->lo < src->hi) {
    self->points[0] = src->lo;
    self->points[1] = src->hi;
    self->count = 1;
}

I'm not sure the temporary variable helps with legibility -- it just saved typing a few characters at the expense of adding a lot of characters. (And a confusing variable, too.)

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C isn't so intuitive to me. Think the book would be valuable to a beginner. I'm using Joy of C: Programming in C by Miller & Quilici –  historystamp Jul 17 '12 at 3:18
    
I think Expert C Programming is an excellent second book. It'd be too much for a first book. I think the second edition of The C Programming Language is probably the best first book. I'm not familiar with The Joy Of C, but the description on the Wiley website sounds good enough, and Wiley is usually good for a good book. –  sarnold Jul 18 '12 at 23:26
    
I received "Expert C Programming: Deep C Secrets." It looks interesting. The author has a sense of humor. Thanks for your advice. –  historystamp Jul 23 '12 at 22:55
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In the middle section you say points is an array 4 of pointer to struct span. In the third section you are assigning points from self->points (meaning the previous value of points, that array, has been lost). You then dereference points as if it were an array of struct Span and not an array of pointers to struct Span.

In other works, this cannot compile because you are mixing types and even if you were not, you are overwriting the memory allocated by your definition of the points variable.

Providing the definition of Series might help explain what is going on.

But certainly in the first example, points should probably be a Span *points but without seeing Series we cannot tell for sure.

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I added struct series & struct span. –  historystamp Jul 17 '12 at 3:15
    
@historystamp: Well, better I guess, but now we need to know how self->points is created. Still doesn't explain the type mismatch issue. –  Seth Robertson Jul 17 '12 at 3:23
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