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I'm fairly decent and writing SQL queries, but my brain has been spinning trying to figure out a the best way to write a query. Here is the setup:

Table Animals has columns: animal_id, farmer_id, type, born_on

This table has tons of rows in it, recording all animal births for each farmer.

What I need to do is get all farmer_ids of farmers where of the 10 most recent animal births for them, at least 3 of are of type "sheep."

Any help is appreciated!

This was my try:

SELECT a.farmer_id
  FROM Animals a
 WHERE
    (select count(game_id)
       from Animals b
      where b.farmer_id = a.farmer_id
      ORDER BY born_on DESC LIMIT 10) >= 3
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That nearly got out of hand. Sorry if I removed any helpful comments - there was waaaaay too much noise for me to make out anything constructive from the thread. –  BoltClock Jul 17 '12 at 6:09
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is a little more difficult because MySQL doesn't have Row_Number() so you'll need to simulate it. One way is use a self join and a count. You could also use the @rownumber technique described here

In my example I used animal_id to find the most recent but you may want to change the JOIN condition to AND t1.born_on < t2.born_on

SELECT farmer_id 
FROM 
(

SELECT t1.farmer_id, 
       t1.animal_id, 
       Count(t2.animal_id) rn, 
       t1.type 
FROM   table1 t1 
       LEFT JOIN table1 t2 
              ON t1.farmer_id = t2.farmer_id 
                 AND t1.animal_id < t2.animal_id 
GROUP  BY t1.farmer_id, 
          t1.animal_id, 
          t1.type
    ) as t
WHERE RN < 10
and type = 'Sheep'
HAVING COUNT(animal_id) >= 3

DEMO

SAMPLE Data used

| ANIMAL_ID | FARMER_ID |  TYPE |
---------------------------------
|         1 |         1 |   dog |
|         2 |         1 |   dog |
|         3 |         1 |   dog |
|         4 |         1 |   dog |
|         5 |         1 |   dog |
|         6 |         1 |   dog |
|         7 |         1 |   dog |
|         8 |         1 |   dog |
|         9 |         1 |   dog |
|        10 |         1 |   dog |
|        11 |         2 |   dog |
|        12 |         2 |   dog |
|        13 |         2 |   dog |
|        14 |         2 |   dog |
|        15 |         2 |   dog |
|        16 |         2 |   dog |
|        17 |         2 | sheep |
|        18 |         2 | sheep |
|        19 |         2 | sheep |
|        20 |         3 | sheep |
|        21 |         3 | sheep |
|        22 |         3 | sheep |
|        23 |         3 |   cat |
|        24 |         3 |   cat |
|        25 |         3 |   cat |
|        26 |         3 |   cat |
|        27 |         3 |   cat |
|        28 |         3 |   cat |
|        29 |         3 |   cat |
|        30 |         3 |   cat |

The result is only 2 because even though 3 has three sheep they weren't in the last 10

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Assuming that you're using PHP (which is tagged here), instead of making one query, it's a lot simpler to make several queries and have the selection (either general or sheep)

Or alternately, select three sheep, get the indices, and select seven more where the indices are not those of the first three sheep selected.

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1  
Thank you for the first constructive reply! I agree that PHP might make things easier, but in terms of size, lets just say that the Animal's table has 30 million rows in it (those animals like to get it on). Also, I can't just pick 3 sheep because there might be say, millions of sheep all with different animal_ids. –  Fishsticks Jul 17 '12 at 4:43
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