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Say I have only two flags (bCold and bHot) that are getting set. I've discovered what all possible combinations should equal. How then can I determine what the original (or compatible) constants would be from the below?

When bCold and bHot are both turned ON = 0x4100
When bCold and bHot are both turned OFF = 0x8200

If bCold is ON and bHOT is OFF =  0x8100
If bCold is OFF and bHOT is ON =  0x4200

Knowing the above, what should I set bCold and bHot to equal?

#define bCold  ((ULONG)0x???)
#define bHot   ((ULONG)0x???)

// Turn them on sometime later
long lCONFIG_FLAGS = bCold | bHOT; 
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Could you put it into equation form? –  Mysticial Jul 17 '12 at 5:20
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This looks more like a math question than a programming question. –  Benjamin Lindley Jul 17 '12 at 5:23
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There is no constant you can OR in to match these requirements. For example, the transition from bCold being off to on is a change from 0x4200 to 0x4100 -- this removes the 0x200 bit and adds in the 0x100 bit. You would have to do this in two operations using two different constants. –  cdhowie Jul 17 '12 at 5:23
    
I'm trying to determine how to set options in a GUI program. These are the values it is setting. If I knew the original Constants I could do "long lCONFIG_FLAGS = bCold | bHOT;" when needed. This is not a school project. –  pcunite Jul 17 '12 at 5:27
    
By 0x4100 you mean exactly what you wrote? 16640 in decimal? –  SingerOfTheFall Jul 17 '12 at 5:31
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Let's say that 0bXXXXXXXY means binary where Y is the less significant bit.


Assuming the result is set with bitwise operations:

Your numbers are made of two bytes. The right (less significant) byte is always 0b00000000, since all numbers end with 00. Lets look at the left (more significant) byte:

When bCold and bHot are both turned ON = 0x4100 = 0b01000001

When bCold and bHot are both turned OFF = 0x8200 = 0b10000010

If bCold is ON and bHOT is OFF = 0x8100 = 0b10000001

If bCold is OFF and bHOT is ON = 0x4200 = 0b01000010

From this you can see that the two left-most bits set the bHot, and the two rightmost bits set the bCold (right = less significant).

So:

0b01000000 = *bHot* ON -= `0x40`

0b00000001 = *bCold*  ON  = `0x01`

0b10000000 = *bHot* OFF = `0x80`

0b00000010 = *bCold*  OFF = `0x02`

Now, add the right byte, which we said is always zero, and you get

*bHot* ON = 0x4000, OFF = 0x8000
*bCold*  ON = 0x0100, OFF = 0x0200

The result is set by bitwise "OR"


Assuming the result is set by simply adding numbers:

(which is wrong, because your post name include the bitwise OR mention, but still let's try it just for fun) A simple equation will show us these figures:

*bCold* OFF: 0x0200, ON:  0x0100
*bHot*  OFF: 0x8000, ON:  0x4000

The result could be set by simply adding the numbers, e.g. 0x0200 + 0x8000 = 0x8200 for both OFF.


Conclusion

As you can see, so the final result is:

*bCold* OFF: 0x0200, ON: 0x0100

*bHot*  OFF: 0x8000, ON: 0x4000
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C: ON H: ON = 0100 0001 0000 0000
C:OFF H:OFF = 1000 0010 0000 0000
C: ON H:OFF = 1000 0001 0000 0000
C:OFF H: ON = 0100 0010 0000 0000

bit-wise xor the alternating values to get the interesting bits, then bit-wise and these bits to get actual masks:

C:OFF  OR C: ON = 1000 0010 0000 0000 XOR 1000 0001 0000 0000 = 0000 0011 0000 0000
C:OFF           = 1000 0010 0000 0000 AND 0000 0011 0000 0000 = 0000 0010 0000 0000
C: ON           = 1000 0001 0000 0000 AND 0000 0011 0000 0000 = 0000 0001 0000 0000

so C uses the second half of the first byte, 0x0100 is on mask, 0x0200 is off mask

H:OFF  OR H: ON = 1000 0010 0000 0000 XOR 0100 0010 0000 0000 = 1100 0000 0000 0000
H:OFF           = 1000 0010 0000 0000 AND 1100 0000 0000 0000 = 1000 0000 0000 0000
H: ON           = 0100 0010 0000 0000 AND 1100 0000 0000 0000 = 0100 0000 0000 0000

so H uses the first half of the first byte, 0x4000 is on mask, 0x8000 is off mask

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Given that

When bCold and bHot are both turned OFF = 0x8200
If bCold is ON and bHOT is OFF =  0x8100

bHot could be the first half-byte since it stays the same, and bCold is the second half-byte since it changes. This way you get:

bHot  is ON:  0x4000
bCold is ON:  0x0100
bHot  is OFF: 0x8000
bCold is OFF: 0x0200

Probably other solutions exist, I haven't checked. Update: Yes, other solutions do exist: assign variables to the four statements "bCold is OFF" etc and write the statements as a system of four equations. You'll find that you'll get infinitely many solutions by adjusting the above by multiples of [1 -1 1 -1]. For example this satisfies the equations, too:

Using + to add:                      Using XOR to add:
bHot  is ON:  0x4100                 bHot  is ON:  0x4100
bCold is ON:  0x0000                 bCold is ON:  0x0000
bHot  is OFF: 0x8100                 bHot  is OFF: 0x8100
bCold is OFF: 0x0100                 bCold is OFF: 0x0300
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