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I have a situation where I am building a web service hosted on IIS that requires a license file to be on the filesystem before starting up successfully. I'm wondering where I should put the code that does the license check to prevent the Website from actually starting.

I have found there is a function Application_Start but this isn't called until someone makes an initial request.

Ideally, the app would check the license and log an error in the Windows Event Log when the IIS Admin tries to start the website itself. Is this possible? If not, are there any best practices for this type of situation?

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I don't think IIS even tries to load your application assemblies until the first request comes in (it does "lazy loading"), so this may not be possible. –  cdhowie Jul 17 '12 at 5:27
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Why don't you just disable the functionalities in it and display a warning? If you're trying to make somebody pay for you software if there's no licence it will probably be even better since nobody wants to show to their clients that they're not paying... –  jl. Jul 17 '12 at 5:38
    
@cdhowie - this is what I've been starting to realize. –  brianestey Jul 18 '12 at 8:13
    
@jl - I want the person setting up the website to know immediately that the license is not correct and not wait until a client sees some message that they are not paying. –  brianestey Jul 18 '12 at 8:14
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Bombing an entire website because a part of it that uses your component which isn't registered is very bad form.

To that end, I you could put something in the static constructor(s) of your class(es) that checks the licensing and then throws an exception (any will do) if your licensing requirements are not found, like so:

public static MyComponent
{
    static MyComponent()
    {
         // Check for licensing here.
         if (!<licensing condition>)
         {
             // Bomb the app.
             throw new InvalidOperationException("Component is not licensed.");
         }
    }
}

If you really want to bomb the entire website, then you'll more than likely have to do this outside of ASP.NET, and write an ISAPI filter (note, you have to do it in unmanaged code) and get it installed on the IIS server.

Or, you could implement the IHttpModule interface. In the Init method implementation you could check for your licensing requirements. If the requirements are not set, then throw an exception, like so:

public class MyLicensingHttpModule : IHttpModule
{
    public void Init(HttpApplication context)
    {
         // Check for licensing here.
         if (!<licensing condition>)
         {
             // Bomb the app.
             throw new InvalidOperationException("Component is not licensed.");
         }            
    }
}

(Note that you still have to register the IHttpModule implementation)

A better solution would be to implement IHttpModule, but set a flag that your libraries/components can access as needed:

public class MyLicensingHttpModule : IHttpModule
{
    // Set when the application is initialized
    public static IsLicensed { get; private set; }

    public void Init(HttpApplication context)
    {
         // Check for licensing here.  Set
         // the flag accordingly.
         IsLicensded = <licensing condition>;
    }
}

The flag would subsequently be checked for in every constructor and/or static constructor to ensure compliance:

public class MyComponentA
{
     static MyComponentA()
     {
          // Check here.
          if (!MyLicensingHttpModule.IsLicensed)
          {
              // Bomb the *type*.
              throw new InvalidOperationException(
                  "MyComponentA is not licensed.");
          }
     }
}

public class MyComponentB
{
     public MyComponentB()
     {
          // Or check on a per-instance basis.  You'd do
          // this if you needed properties on the class level
          // to be available regardless.  This is the
          // *less* likely scenario.
          if (!MyLicensingHttpModule.IsLicensed)
          {
              // Bomb the *instance*.
              throw new InvalidOperationException(
                  "MyComponentA is not licensed.");
          }
     }
}

This would force installation of the module (without it, the flag is not set, which would cause an exception to the thrown), and should give you the opportunity to hook into every page request that uses your component and prevent usage if you wish.

If you do go this route, I have to reemphasize that it's in very bad form to bomb the entire application, and you should really focus on your component when it is used; this isn't really your call to make.

It's very possible that the developer(s) have other pages that do not use your component, while using other paid components which should render just fine.

Also, if you hook into every request, you should make sure that you don't do anything to incur a performance hit. That would also be in bad form as well. This is why you set the flag once and then do a simple check when you need to.

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I don't understand why it is bad form to check a license at startup. Certainly, as you mention, I don't think it should check on every request. The website in question is a web service and it shouldn't run if it is unlicensed. The reason I want it not to start when the license isn't found is because it gives immediate feedback to the person setting up the webservice - ie. they configure and start the website and if it stops they check the event log for errors and an error saying "License not found" is there. –  brianestey Jul 18 '12 at 8:12
    
@brianestey I might have been a little too aggressive when reading your question; it appeared to me that you wanted to bomb the entire site. There's nothing wrong with checking the license at startup, but even if you check at startup, what are you going to do if it's not there? You can either set the flag to false, or throw an exception. If you throw an exception, you bomb the app, and that's in bad form. You should only give an exception when you try to access your components and they don't have licenses, not otherwise. –  casperOne Jul 18 '12 at 12:42
    
I reread your answer and it does seem to make more sense to include the license check at the point where the license is actually required. Thanks for the in-depth answer and advice. –  brianestey Jul 20 '12 at 2:10
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