Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

As an exercise, and mostly for my own amusement, I'm implementing a backtracking packrat parser. The inspiration for this is i'd like to have a better idea about how hygenic macros would work in an algol-like language (as apposed to the syntax free lisp dialects you normally find them in). Because of this, different passes through the input might see different grammars, so cached parse results are invalid, unless I also store the current version of the grammar along with the cached parse results. (EDIT: a consequence of this use of key-value collections is that they should be immutable, but I don't intend to expose the interface to allow them to be changed, so either mutable or immutable collections are fine)

The problem is that python dicts cannot appear as keys to other dicts. Even using a tuple (as I'd be doing anyways) doesn't help.

>>> cache = {}
>>> rule = {"foo":"bar"}
>>> cache[(rule, "baz")] = "quux"
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: unhashable type: 'dict'
>>> 

I guess it has to be tuples all the way down. Now the python standard library provides approximately what i'd need, collections.namedtuple has a very different syntax, but can be used as a key. continuing from above session:

>>> from collections import namedtuple
>>> Rule = namedtuple("Rule",rule.keys())
>>> cache[(Rule(**rule), "baz")] = "quux"
>>> cache
{(Rule(foo='bar'), 'baz'): 'quux'}

Ok. But I have to make a class for each possible combination of keys in the rule I would want to use, which isn't so bad, because each parse rule knows exactly what parameters it uses, so that class can be defined at the same time as the function that parses the rule.

Edit: An additional problem with namedtuples is that they are strictly positional. Two tuples that look like they should be different can in fact be the same:

>>> you = namedtuple("foo",["bar","baz"])
>>> me = namedtuple("foo",["bar","quux"])
>>> you(bar=1,baz=2) == me(bar=1,quux=2)
True
>>> bob = namedtuple("foo",["baz","bar"])
>>> you(bar=1,baz=2) == bob(bar=1,baz=2)
False

tl'dr: How do I get dicts that can be used as keys to other dicts?

Having hacked a bit on the answers, here's the more complete solution I'm using. Note that this does a bit extra work to make the resulting dicts vaguely immutable for practical purposes. Of course it's still quite easy to hack around it by calling dict.__setitem__(instance, key, value) but we're all adults here.

class hashdict(dict):
    """
    hashable dict implementation, suitable for use as a key into
    other dicts.

        >>> h1 = hashdict({"apples": 1, "bananas":2})
        >>> h2 = hashdict({"bananas": 3, "mangoes": 5})
        >>> h1+h2
        hashdict(apples=1, bananas=3, mangoes=5)
        >>> d1 = {}
        >>> d1[h1] = "salad"
        >>> d1[h1]
        'salad'
        >>> d1[h2]
        Traceback (most recent call last):
        ...
        KeyError: hashdict(bananas=3, mangoes=5)

    based on answers from
       http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1151658/python-hashable-dicts

    """
    def __key(self):
        return tuple(sorted(self.items()))
    def __repr__(self):
        return "{0}({1})".format(self.__class__.__name__,
            ", ".join("{0}={1}".format(
                    str(i[0]),repr(i[1])) for i in self.__key()))

    def __hash__(self):
        return hash(self.__key())
    def __setitem__(self, key, value):
        raise TypeError("{0} does not support item assignment"
                         .format(self.__class__.__name__))
    def __delitem__(self, key):
        raise TypeError("{0} does not support item assignment"
                         .format(self.__class__.__name__))
    def clear(self):
        raise TypeError("{0} does not support item assignment"
                         .format(self.__class__.__name__))
    def pop(self, *args, **kwargs):
        raise TypeError("{0} does not support item assignment"
                         .format(self.__class__.__name__))
    def popitem(self, *args, **kwargs):
        raise TypeError("{0} does not support item assignment"
                         .format(self.__class__.__name__))
    def setdefault(self, *args, **kwargs):
        raise TypeError("{0} does not support item assignment"
                         .format(self.__class__.__name__))
    def update(self, *args, **kwargs):
        raise TypeError("{0} does not support item assignment"
                         .format(self.__class__.__name__))
    def __add__(self, right):
        result = hashdict(self)
        dict.update(result, right)
        return result

if __name__ == "__main__":
    import doctest
    doctest.testmod()
share|improve this question

8 Answers 8

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Here is the easy way to make a hashable dictionary. Just remember not to mutate them after embedding in another dictionary for obvious reasons.

class hashabledict(dict):
    def __hash__(self):
        return hash(tuple(sorted(self.items())))
share|improve this answer
    
This looks promising! –  IfLoop Jul 20 '09 at 4:36
5  
This does not sharply ensure consistency of eq and hash while my earlier answer does through the use of the __key method (in practice either approach should work, though this one might be slowed down by making an unneeded itermediate list -- fixable by s/items/iteritems/ -- assuming Python 2.* as you don't say;-). –  Alex Martelli Jul 20 '09 at 4:48
    
@Alex, yes you can fix it with iteritems. I copied and pasted this solution from a google link. As for ensuring consistency of hash, there should be no problems. Equality is also not a problem. hashabledict(a=5) == hashabledict(a=5) is true. –  Unknown Jul 20 '09 at 5:01
    
Both solutions seem to be about the same, and this is probably the kernel of how I will solve the problem, so I'm accepting yours since you have a lower rep. –  IfLoop Jul 20 '09 at 18:16
2  
It would probably be better to just use a frozenset rather than a tuple with sorting. Not only would this be faster, but you can't assume that dictionary keys are comparable. –  asmeurer Aug 25 '12 at 1:14

Hashables should be immutable -- not enforcing this but TRUSTING you not to mutate a dict after its first use as a key, the following approach would work:

class hashabledict(dict):
  def __key(self):
    return tuple((k,self[k]) for k in sorted(self))
  def __hash__(self):
    return hash(self.__key())
  def __eq__(self, other):
    return self.__key() == other.__key()

If you DO need to mutate your dicts and STILL want to use them as keys, complexity explodes hundredfolds -- not to say it can't be done, but I'll wait until a VERY specific indication before I get into THAT incredible morass!-)

share|improve this answer
    
I certainly do not want to mutate the dicts once they have been prepared. That would make the rest of the packrad algorithm fall apart. –  IfLoop Jul 20 '09 at 4:21
    
Then the subclass I suggested will work -- note how it bypasses the "positional" issue (before you had edited your question to point it out;-) with the sorted in __key;-). –  Alex Martelli Jul 20 '09 at 4:44
    
The position dependent behavior of namedtuple surprised the heck out of me. I had been playing with it, thinking it might still be an easier way to solve the problem, but that pretty much dashed all my hopes (and will require a rollback :( ) –  IfLoop Jul 20 '09 at 18:15

The given answers are okay, but they could be improved by using frozenset(...) instead of tuple(sorted(...)) to generate the hash:

>>> import timeit
>>> timeit.timeit('hash(tuple(sorted(d.iteritems())))', "d = dict(a=3, b='4', c=2345, asdfsdkjfew=0.23424, x='sadfsadfadfsaf')")
4.7758948802947998
>>> timeit.timeit('hash(frozenset(d.iteritems()))', "d = dict(a=3, b='4', c=2345, asdfsdkjfew=0.23424, x='sadfsadfadfsaf')")
1.8153600692749023

The performance advantage depends on the content of the dictionary, but in most cases I've tested, hashing with frozenset is at least 2 times faster (mainly because it does not need to sort).

share|improve this answer
    
Note, there is no need to include both the keys and and the values. This solution would be much faster as: hash(frozenset(d)). –  Raymond Hettinger Apr 23 '13 at 6:09
2  
@RaymondHettinger: hash(frozenset(d)) results in identical hashes for 2 dicts with similar keys but different values! –  Oben Sonne Apr 23 '13 at 8:45
1  
That isn't a problem. It is the job of __eq__ to distinguish between dicts of differing values. The job of __hash__ is merely to reduce the search space. –  Raymond Hettinger Apr 23 '13 at 21:10
1  
That's true for the theoretical concept of hashes and mappings but not practical for caches with dictionaries as lookups -- it is not uncommon that dictionaries with similar keys but different values are passed to a mem-cached function. In that case the cache pratically turns into a list instead of a mapping if only the keys are used for building a hash. –  Oben Sonne Apr 26 '13 at 13:05
1  
In the special case of dicts with indentical keys and distinct values, you would be better-off just storing a hash based on frozenset(d.itervalues()). In cases where dicts have distinct keys, frozenset(d) is much faster and imposes no restrictions on the hashability of keys. Lastly, remember that the dict.__eq__ method will check for equal key/value pairs much quicker that anything can compute the hash for all the key/value pair tuples. Using key/value tuples is also problematic because it throws away the stored hashes for all the keys (that is why frozenset(d) is so fast). –  Raymond Hettinger Apr 29 '13 at 5:55

A reasonably clean, straightforward implementation is

import collections

class FrozenDict(collections.Mapping):
    """Don't forget the docstrings!!"""

    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        self._d = dict(*args, **kwargs)

    def __iter__(self):
        return iter(self._d)

    def __len__(self):
        return len(self._d)

    def __getitem__(self, key):
        return self._d[key]

    def __hash__(self):
        return hash(tuple(sorted(self._d.iteritems())))
share|improve this answer

All that is needed to make dictionaries usable for your purpose is to add a __hash__ method:

class Hashabledict(dict):
    def __hash__(self):
        return hash(frozenset(self))

Note, the frozenset conversion will work for all dictionaries (i.e. it doesn't require the keys to be sortable). Likewise, there is no restriction on the dictionary values.

If there are many dictionaries with identical keys but with distinct values, it is necessary to have the hash take the values into account. The fastest way to do that is:

class Hashabledict(dict):
    def __hash__(self):
        return hash((frozenset(self), frozenset(self.itervalues())))

This is quicker than frozenset(self.iteritems()) for two reasons. First, the frozenset(self) step reuses the hash values stored in the dictionary, saving unnecessary calls to hash(key). Second, using itervalues will access the values directly and avoid the many memory allocator calls using by items to form new many key/value tuples in memory every time you do a lookup.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 interesting hash optimization, thanks for weighing in! –  IfLoop May 21 '13 at 11:54

I keep coming back to this topic... Here's another variation. I'm uneasy with subclassing dict to add a __hash__ method; There's virtually no escape from the problem that dict's are mutable, and trusting that they won't change seems like a weak idea. So I've instead looked at building a mapping based on a builtin type that is itself immutable. although tuple is an obvious choice, accessing values in it implies a sort and a bisect; not a problem, but it doesn't seem to be leveraging much of the power of the type it's built on.

What if you jam key, value pairs into a frozenset? What would that require, how would it work?

Part 1, you need a way of encoding the 'item's in such a way that a frozenset will treat them mainly by their keys; I'll make a little subclass for that.

import collections
class pair(collections.namedtuple('pair_base', 'key value')):
    def __hash__(self):
        return hash((self.key, None))
    def __eq__(self, other):
        if type(self) != type(other):
            return NotImplemented
        return self.key == other.key
    def __repr__(self):
        return repr((self.key, self.value))

That alone puts you in spitting distance of an immutable mapping:

>>> frozenset(pair(k, v) for k, v in enumerate('abcd'))
frozenset([(0, 'a'), (2, 'c'), (1, 'b'), (3, 'd')])
>>> pairs = frozenset(pair(k, v) for k, v in enumerate('abcd'))
>>> pair(2, None) in pairs
True
>>> pair(5, None) in pairs
False
>>> goal = frozenset((pair(2, None),))
>>> pairs & goal
frozenset([(2, None)])

D'oh! Unfortunately, when you use the set operators and the elements are equal but not the same object; which one ends up in the return value is undefined, we'll have to go through some more gyrations.

>>> pairs - (pairs - goal)
frozenset([(2, 'c')])
>>> iter(pairs - (pairs - goal)).next().value
'c'

However, looking values up in this way is cumbersome, and worse, creates lots of intermediate sets; that won't do! We'll create a 'fake' key-value pair to get around it:

class Thief(object):
    def __init__(self, key):
        self.key = key
    def __hash__(self):
        return hash(pair(self.key, None))
    def __eq__(self, other):
        self.value = other.value
        return pair(self.key, None) == other

Which results in the less problematic:

>>> thief = Thief(2)
>>> thief in pairs
True
>>> thief.value
'c'

That's all the deep magic; the rest is wrapping it all up into something that has an interface like a dict. Since we're subclassing from frozenset, which has a very different interface, there's quite a lot of methods; we get a little help from collections.Mapping, but most of the work is overriding the frozenset methods for versions that work like dicts, instead:

class FrozenDict(frozenset, collections.Mapping):
    def __new__(cls, seq=()):
        return frozenset.__new__(cls, (pair(k, v) for k, v in seq))
    def __getitem__(self, key):
        thief = Thief(key)
        if frozenset.__contains__(self, thief):
            return thief.value
        raise KeyError(key)
    def __eq__(self, other):
        if not isinstance(other, FrozenDict):
            return dict(self.iteritems()) == other
        if len(self) != len(other):
            return False
        for key, value in self.iteritems():
            try:
                if value != other[key]:
                    return False
            except KeyError:
                return False
        return True
    def __hash__(self):
        return hash(frozenset(self.iteritems()))
    def get(self, key, default=None):
        thief = Thief(key)
        if frozenset.__contains__(self, thief):
            return thief.value
        return default
    def __iter__(self):
        for item in frozenset.__iter__(self):
            yield item.key
    def iteritems(self):
        for item in frozenset.__iter__(self):
            yield (item.key, item.value)
    def iterkeys(self):
        for item in frozenset.__iter__(self):
            yield item.key
    def itervalues(self):
        for item in frozenset.__iter__(self):
            yield item.value
    def __contains__(self, key):
        return frozenset.__contains__(self, pair(key, None))
    has_key = __contains__
    def __repr__(self):
        return type(self).__name__ + (', '.join(repr(item) for item in self.iteritems())).join('()')
    @classmethod
    def fromkeys(cls, keys, value=None):
        return cls((key, value) for key in keys)

which, ultimately, does answer my own question:

>>> myDict = {}
>>> myDict[FrozenDict(enumerate('ab'))] = 5
>>> FrozenDict(enumerate('ab')) in myDict
True
>>> FrozenDict(enumerate('bc')) in myDict
False
>>> FrozenDict(enumerate('ab', 3)) in myDict
False
>>> myDict[FrozenDict(enumerate('ab'))]
5
share|improve this answer

You might also want to add these two methods to get the v2 pickling protocol work with hashdict instances. Otherwise cPickle will try to use hashdict._setitem_ resulting in a TypeError. Interestingly, with the other two versions of the protocol your code works just fine.

def __setstate__(self, objstate):
    for k,v in objstate.items():
        dict.__setitem__(self,k,v)
def __reduce__(self):
    return (hashdict, (), dict(self),)
share|improve this answer

If you don't put numbers in the dictionary and you never lose the variables containing your dictionaries, you can do this:

cache[id(rule)] = "whatever"

since id() is unique for every dictionary

EDIT:

Oh sorry, yeah in that case what the other guys said would be better. I think you could also serialize your dictionaries as a string, like

cache[ 'foo:bar' ] = 'baz'

If you need to recover your dictionaries from the keys though, then you'd have to do something uglier like

cache[ 'foo:bar' ] = ( {'foo':'bar'}, 'baz' )

I guess the advantage of this is that you wouldn't have to write as much code.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmmm, no; this isn't what I'm Looking for: cache[id({'foo':'bar'})] = 'baz'; id({'foo':'bar'}) not in cache , Being able to dynamically create keys is of importance for when I want to use dicts as keys in the first place. –  IfLoop Apr 13 '12 at 0:45
1  
Serializing the dicts might be ok, do you have a reccomendation on a way to serialize them? that's what I'm looking for. –  IfLoop May 21 '12 at 21:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.