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Is it possible to initialize structs in C++ as indicated below

struct address {
                 int street_no;
                 char *street_name;
                 char *city;
                 char *prov;
                 char *postal_code;
               };
address temp_address =
               { .city = "Hamilton", .prov = "Ontario" };

The links here and here mention that it is possible to use this style only in C. If so why is this not possible in C++? Is there any underlying technical reason why it is not implemented in C++, or is it bad practice to use this style. I like using this way of initializing because my struct is big and this style gives me clear readability of what value is assigned to which member.

Please share with me if there are other ways through which we can achieve the same readability.

I have referred the following links before posting this question

  1. C/C++ for AIX
  2. C Structure Initialization with Variable
  3. Static structure initialization with tags in C++
  4. C++11 Proper Structure Initialization
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10  
Personal view of the world: you don't need this style of object initialization in C++ because you should be using a constructor instead. –  Philip Kendall Jul 17 '12 at 5:50
2  
Yes I thought of that, but I have an array of big Structure. It would be easy and readable for me to use this way. Do you have any style/good practice of initializing using Constructor which gives better readability too. –  Dinesh P.R. Jul 17 '12 at 5:54
2  
Have you considered the boost parameter library, in combination with constructors? boost.org/doc/libs/1_50_0/libs/parameter/doc/html/index.html –  Tony D Jul 17 '12 at 5:59
4  
Not so programming related: this address works fine in the US only. In France, we don't have an "province", in other parts of the world, there is no postal code, a grand-mother of a friend lives in such a small village that her address is "Ms X, postal-code small-village-name" (yep, no street). So consider carefully what a valid address is to the market you will apply this to ;) –  Matthieu M. Jul 17 '12 at 7:03
1  
@MatthieuM. There are no provinces in the US (this might be a Canadian format?), but there are states, territories, and even tiny villages that don't bother to name streets. So the issue of address conformance applies even here. –  Tim Nov 3 '13 at 23:18

8 Answers 8

up vote 43 down vote accepted

If you want to make it clear what each initializer value is, just split it up on multiple lines, with a comment on each:

address temp_addres = {
  0,  // street_no
  nullptr,  // street_name
  "Hamilton",  // city
  "Ontario",  // prov
  nullptr,  // postal_code
};
share|improve this answer
1  
I personally like and recommend this style –  Dinesh P.R. Jul 17 '12 at 6:22
69  
I don't, because it's error prone to maintain. –  orlp Jul 17 '12 at 11:00
19  
Agreed; C invented tagged initialization for a good reason. –  Edward Falk Mar 12 '13 at 20:11
    
Beware of initializing one member with an expression using other members, lest values be used before being set (here, to 640 and 480): foo = { new char[foo.width * foo.height], 640, 480 }; –  Camille Goudeseune Feb 2 at 22:05

After my question resulted in no satisfying result (because C++ doesn't implement tag-based init for structures), I took the trick I found here: Are members of a C++ struct initialized to 0 by default?

For you it would amount to do that:

address temp_address = {}; // will zero all fields in C++
temp_address.city = "Hamilton";
temp_address.prov = "Ontario";

This is certainly the closest to what you wanted originally (zero all the fields except those you want to initialize).

share|improve this answer
    
This does not work for statically inintialized objects –  user877329 Apr 10 '14 at 9:24
1  
static address temp_address = {}; will work. Filling it up afterwards is up to the runtime, yes. You can bypass this by providing a static function that does the init for you: static address temp_address = init_my_temp_address();. –  Gui13 Apr 10 '14 at 9:27

The field identifiers are indeed C initializer syntax. In C++ just give the values in the correct order without the field names. Unfortunately this means you need to give them all (actually you can omit trailing zero-valued fields and the result will be the same):

address temp_address = { 0, 0, "Hamilton", "Ontario", 0 }; 
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1  
Yes you can always use aligned struct initialization. –  texasbruce Jul 17 '12 at 5:53
2  
Yes, currently I am using this method only(Aligned Struct Initialization). But I feel the readability is not good. Since my Structure is big the initializer has so many data and it is difficult for me to track which value is assigned to which member. –  Dinesh P.R. Jul 17 '12 at 5:57
3  
@DineshP.R. Then write a constructor! –  Mr Lister Jul 17 '12 at 5:59

It's not implemented in C++. (also, char* strings? I hope not).

Usually if you have so many parameters it is a fairly serious code smell. But instead, why not simply value-initialize the struct and then assign each member?

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4  
"(also, char* strings? I hope not)." - Well, it is a C example. –  Ed S. Jul 17 '12 at 6:06
3  
He's converting to C++. –  Puppy Jul 17 '12 at 6:13
    
cant we use char* in C++? Currently I am using it and it is working (may be I am doing something wrong). My assumption is that the compiler will create constant strings of "Hamilton" & "Ontario" and assign their address to the struct members. Will it be correct to use const char* instead? –  Dinesh P.R. Jul 17 '12 at 6:13
7  
You can use char* but const char* is much more type-safe and everybody just uses std::string because it's much more reliable. –  Puppy Jul 17 '12 at 6:14
    
Ok. When I read "as mentioned below" I assumed it was an example copied from somewhere. –  Ed S. Jul 17 '12 at 6:15

You can even pack Gui13's solution into single initialization statement:

struct address {
                 int street_no;
                 char *street_name;
                 char *city;
                 char *prov;
                 char *postal_code;
               };


address ta = (ta = address(), ta.city = "Hamilton", ta.prov = "Ontario", ta);

Disclaimer: I don't recommend this style

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I know this question is quite old, but I found another way of initializing, using constexpr and currying:

struct mp_struct_t {
    public:
        constexpr mp_struct_t(int member1) : mp_struct_t(member1, 0, 0) {}
        constexpr mp_struct_t(int member1, int member2, int member3) : member1(member1), member2(member2), member3(member3) {}
        constexpr mp_struct_t another_member(int member) { return {member1, member,     member2}; }
        constexpr mp_struct_t yet_another_one(int member) { return {member1, member2, member}; }

    int member1, member2, member3;
};

static mp_struct_t a_struct = mp_struct_t{1}
                           .another_member(2)
                           .yet_another_one(3);

This method also works for global static variables and even constexpr ones. The only disadvantage is the bad maintainability: Everytime another member has to be made initializable using this method, all member initialization methods have to be changed.

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You can just initialize via ctor:

struct address {
  address() : city("Hamilton"), prov("Ontario") {}
  int street_no;
  char *street_name;
  char *city;
  char *prov;
  char *postal_code;
};
share|improve this answer
2  
This is the case only if you control the definition of struct address. Also, POD types often intentionally have no constructor and destructor. –  user4815162342 Jun 21 '14 at 16:38

you can use extern "C" to compile the c code in C++. In your case you can use below code

extern "C" {
//write your C code which you want to compile in C++
struct address {
int street_no;
char *street_name;`enter code here`
char *city;
char *prov;
char *postal_code;
};
address temp_address ={ .city = "Hamilton", .prov = "Ontario" };
}
share|improve this answer
12  
extern "C" does not "compile the C code", the contents of an extern "C" block are still C++ code, all it does as affect name-mangling not the language used in the block. –  Jonathan Wakely May 21 '13 at 13:17

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