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while getopts "hd:R:" arg; do
  case $arg in
    h)
      echo "usgae" 
      ;;
    d)
      dir=$OPTARG
      ;;
    R)
      if [[ $OPTARG =~ ^[0-9]+$ ]];then
        level=$OPTARG
      else
        level=1
      ;;
    \?)
      echo "WRONG" >&2
      ;;
  esac
done
  • level refers to parameter of -R, dir refers to parameters of -d

  • when I input ./count.sh -R 1 -d test/ it works rightly

  • when I input ./count.sh -d test/ -R 1 it works rightly

  • but I want to make it work when I input ./count.sh -d test/ -R or ./count.sh -R -d test/

This means that I want -R has a default value and the sequence of command could be more flexible.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

getopts doesn't really support this; but it's not hard to write your own replacement.

while true; do
    case $1 in
      -R) level=1
            shift
            case $1 in
              *[!0-9]* | "") ;;
              *) level=$1; shift ;;
            esac ;;
        # ... Other options ...
        -*) echo "$0: Unrecognized option $1" >&2
            exit 2;;
        *) break ;;
    esac
done
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Wrong. Actually getopts does support optional arguments! From the bash man page:

If  a  required  argument is not found, and getopts is not silent, 
a question mark (?) is placed in name, OPTARG is unset, and a diagnostic
message is printed.  If getopts is silent, then a colon (:) is placed in name 
and OPTARG is set to the option character found.

When the man page says "silent" it means silent error reporting. To enable it, the first character of optstring needs to be a colon:

while getopts ":hd:R:" arg; do
    # ...rest of iverson's loop should work as posted 
done

Since Bash's getopt does not recognize -- to end the options list, it may not work when -R is the last option, followed by some path argument.

P.S.: Traditionally, getopt.c uses two colons (::) to specify an optional argument. However, the version used by Bash doesn't.

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Not in a meaningful way. If -R is the last argument it's not processed –  gerardw Sep 12 '13 at 15:14

I agree with tripleee, getopts does not support optional argument handling.

The compromised solution I have settled on is to use the upper case/lower case combination of the same option flag to differentiate between the option that takes an argument and the other that does not.

Example:

COMMAND_LINE_OPTIONS_HELP='
Command line options:
    -I          Process all the files in the default dir: '`pwd`'/input/
    -i  DIR     Process all the files in the user specified input dir
    -h          Print this help menu

Examples:
    Process all files in the default input dir
        '`basename $0`' -I

    Process all files in the user specified input dir
        '`basename $0`' -i ~/my/input/dir

'

VALID_COMMAND_LINE_OPTIONS="i:Ih"
INPUT_DIR=

while getopts $VALID_COMMAND_LINE_OPTIONS options; do
    #echo "option is " $options
    case $options in
        h)
            echo "$COMMAND_LINE_OPTIONS_HELP"
            exit $E_OPTERROR;
        ;;
        I)
            INPUT_DIR=`pwd`/input
            echo ""
            echo "***************************"
            echo "Use DEFAULT input dir : $INPUT_DIR"
            echo "***************************"
        ;;
        i)
            INPUT_DIR=$OPTARG
            echo ""
            echo "***************************"
            echo "Use USER SPECIFIED input dir : $INPUT_DIR"
            echo "***************************"
        ;;
        \?)
            echo "Usage: `basename $0` -h for help";
            echo "$COMMAND_LINE_OPTIONS_HELP"
            exit $E_OPTERROR;
        ;;
    esac
done
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while getopts "hd:R:" arg; do
  case $arg in
    h)
      echo "usage" 
    ;;
    d)
      dir=$OPTARG
    ;;
    R)
      if [[ $OPTARG =~ ^[0-9]+$ ]];then
        level=$OPTARG
      elif [[ $OPTARG =~ ^-. ]];then
        level=1
        let OPTIND=$OPTIND-1
      else
        level=1
      fi          
    ;;
    \?)
      echo "WRONG" >&2
    ;;
  esac
done

I think the above code will work for your purposes while still using getopts. I've added the following three lines to your code when getopts encounters -R:

      elif [[ $OPTARG =~ ^-. ]];then
        level=1
        let OPTIND=$OPTIND-1

If -R is encountered and the first argument looks like another getopts parameter, level is set to the default value of 1, and then the $OPTIND variable is reduced by one. The next time getopts goes to grab an argument, it will grab the correct argument instead of skipping it.

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