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I am new to iPhone develepment,

I want to compare two array indices,

for (int i=0; i<[CustomeDateArray count]; i++)
  {
      if (([CustomeDateArray objectAtIndex:1] == [newDateArray objectAtIndex:1]) && ([CustomeDateArray objectAtIndex:2] == [newDateArray objectAtIndex:2]))          
                {
                    exists=TRUE;
                    NSLog(@"exists=TRUE");
                }
  }

My Log shows this Results:

 CustomeDateArray at Index1=06
 CustomeDateArray at Index2=2012

 newDateArray at Index1=06
 newDateArray at Index2=2012

If my if condition is true then control should go inside and it should print exists=TRUE but i am unable to see exists=TRUE control is not going inside.

What's the problem ?

Any help will be appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
So, TRUE is the same as YES in Objective-C, and FALSE is the same as NO, but you should try getting used to using YES and NO. All of Apple's sample code uses them and so does most of the code I've ever seen on the internet. –  Morgan Harris Jul 17 '12 at 6:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
for (int i=0; i<[CustomeDateArray count]; i++)
  {
          if (([[CustomeDateArray objectAtIndex:1] isEqual:[newDateArray objectAtIndex:1]]) && ([[CustomeDateArray objectAtIndex:2] isEqual:[newDateArray objectAtIndex:2]]))        
                {
                    exists=TRUE;
                    NSLog(@"exists=TRUE");
                }
  }

This May Helping to you Happy Coding:-)

share|improve this answer
1  
You probably want to use isEqual: not isEqualToString: but this is totally the right way to compare Objective-C objects. –  Morgan Harris Jul 17 '12 at 6:48
1  
+1 But just one observation: If the items in the arrays are not NSStrings you may need to use isEqual instead of isEqualToString. –  idz Jul 17 '12 at 6:49
    
ok so isEqual is better than isEqualString? –  Nimit Parekh Jul 17 '12 at 6:50
1  
For a little clarification: Objective-C objects are pointers to memory. In other words, what you're doing there with the == operator is asking if they are the same object, that is, the same location in memory, not if their values are the same. The isEqual: method is defined on NSObject, and is used to compare the values of two objects. If you know both objects are strings, isEqualToString: is faster than isEqual:. –  Morgan Harris Jul 17 '12 at 6:52
1  
nice ans Moragn and neon, it is working. –  Krunal Jul 17 '12 at 6:57

Well, I see to kind of problems in your code:

  1. why you are looping inside CustomDateArray (for loop) and you are not using the index "i"? (this is not relevant to the specific question, but just check your code for typos!)

  2. more specific to your question: NSArray contains objects and objects in Obj-C are pointers, so your "==" just compares pointers. This means that:

if([CustomDateArray objectAtIndex:1]==[CustomDateArray objectAtIndex:2]) ...

corresponds to:

id obj1 = [CustomDateArray objectAtIndex:1];
id obj2 = [CustomDateArray objectAtIndex:2];
if(obj1==obj2) ...

The "if" will return true only if obj1 and obj2 point to the same address, so they are exactly the same object. But if the purpose of your check is to know if the two dates are the same date, then you should use the NSDate specific comparison methods:


NSDate *d1 = [CustomDateArray objectAtIndex:1];
NSDate *d2 = [CustomDateArray objectAtIndex:2];
if([d1 isEqualToDate:d2]) ...

Instead, if the objects are string, you should use the "isEqualToString:" method.

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