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Due to the well-known issues with calling virtual methods from inside constructors and destructors, I commonly end up with classes that need a final-setup method to be called just after their constructor, and a pre-teardown method to be called just before their destructor, like this:

MyObject * obj = new MyObject;
obj->Initialize();   // virtual method call, required after ctor for (obj) to run properly
[...]
obj->AboutToDelete();  // virtual method call, required before dtor for (obj) to clean up properly
delete obj;

This works, but it carries with it the risk that the caller will forget to call either or both of those methods at the appropriate times.

So the question is: Is there any way in C++ to get those methods to be called automatically, so the caller doesn't have to remember to do call them? (I'm guessing there isn't, but I thought I'd ask anyway just in case there is some clever way to do it)

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What problem do you have with destructors? –  peterchen Jul 20 '09 at 7:52
4  
Maybe you should describe your actual problem, maybe you don't actually need these calls... –  peterchen Jul 20 '09 at 7:57
2  
if you "commonly" need to call virtual methods from ctors or dtors, it sounds like you have a major design problem. Can you give an example of a class where this is necessary? Most likely, there's a simpler solution. (As usual, I'd expect RAII to solve the problem. Delegate the problem to on or more member variables, with their own ctors/dtors each doing their own part of initialization/teardown. –  jalf Jul 20 '09 at 13:41
1  
Example: I have a Thread class that is used to manage a thread that it holds internally. The user subclasses the Thread class to supply his own entry-point method and member variables for the thread to use. Currently, the user must make sure to call ShutdownInternalThread() before deleting the thread object, otherwise there is a race condition between the time when the subclass's destructor is called and when the Thread class's destructor is called, during which the thread may try to access subclass member variables that were already destroyed. I'd like to remove ShutdownInternalThread(). –  Jeremy Friesner Jul 20 '09 at 15:12
    
Example: I have a Window class with a virtual method GetWindowTypeName() that the subclass must implement to return the name of the window. I'd like to ensure that setWindowTitle(GetWindowTypeName()) gets called to set the window title appropriately in Qt-land, but I can't do that in the Window class ctor since virtual method calls won't work there. So it needs to happen in a separate method call later on; but I don't want to force the user to remember to make that separate call. (Note: this example is slightly contrived; since in Qt I can override showEvent()... but you get the idea) –  Jeremy Friesner Jul 20 '09 at 15:15

8 Answers 8

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The main problem with adding post-constructors to C++ is that nobody has yet established how to deal with post-post-constructors, post-post-post-constructors, etc.

The underlying theory is that objects have invariants. This invariant is established by the constructor. Once it has been established, methods of that class can be called. With the introduction of designs that would require post-constructors, you are introducing situations in which class invariants do not become established once the constructor has run. Therefore, it would be equally unsafe to allow calls to virtual functions from post-constructors, and you immediately lose the one apparent benefit they seemed to have.

As your example shows (probably without you realizing), they're not needed:

MyObject * obj = new MyObject;
obj->Initialize();   // virtual method call, required after ctor for (obj) to run properly

obj->AboutToDelete();  // virtual method call, required before dtor for (obj) to clean up properly
delete obj;

Let's show why these methods are not needed. These two calls can invoke virtual functions from MyObject or one of its bases. However, MyObject::MyObject() can safely call those functions too. There is nothing that happens after MyObject::MyObject() returns which would make obj->Initialize() safe. So either obj->Initialize() is wrong or its call can be moved to MyObject::MyObject(). The same logic applies in reverse to obj->AboutToDelete(). The most derived destructor will run first and it can still call all virtual functions, including AboutToDelete().

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2  
Except when Initialize() is reimplemented in a subclass of MyObject, and I need to call the subclass's implementation, not MyObject::Initialize(). Called from the MyObject constructor, it does not do what I need it to do. (AboutToDelete() has the same problem when called from MyObject::~MyObject()) Anyway, the "thing that happens after MyObject::MyObject() returns" is the execution of the subclass constructors... those need to happen before Initialize() runs. The logic is reversed for AboutToDelete(), which needs to run before any subclass destructors run. –  Jeremy Friesner Jul 20 '09 at 15:27
    
That's obviously not the case here since new MyObject directly precedes the call. And your counter-example merely changes names. The most-derived constructor runs last, when all invariants have been established and all virtual functions can be called. That ctor can still call Initialize() –  MSalters Jul 20 '09 at 15:55
1  
The most-derived constructor can't safely call Initialize(), because it can't know for sure that it is the most-derived constructor. It very well could be that another class has subclassed it, and in that case Initialize() would be called too soon. –  Jeremy Friesner Jul 20 '09 at 20:29
    
That's why each class in such cases offers a protected ctor that doesn't call Initialize(). –  MSalters Jul 21 '09 at 7:53

While there is no automated way, you could force the users hand by denying users access to the destructor on that type and declaring a special delete method. In this method you could do the virtual calls you'd like. Creation can take a similar approach which a static factory method.

class MyObject {
  ...
public:
  static MyObject* Create() { 
    MyObject* pObject = new MyObject();
    pObject->Initialize();
    return pObject;
  }
  Delete() {
    this->AboutToDelete();
    delete this;
  }
private:
  MyObject() { ... }
  virtual ~MyObject() { ... }
};

Now it is not possible to call "delete obj;" unless the call site has access to MyObject private members.

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I like that, +1! –  Kim Gräsman Jul 20 '09 at 5:21
1  
Destructor can (and should) be virtual, why go through the extra work? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 20 '09 at 5:36
    
@dribeas, I updated it to make it virtual. –  JaredPar Jul 20 '09 at 5:53
    
This example is not so correct, as MyObjects could not be stored (easily) in standard containers (vector, list, etc.) And instead of Delete() method, override the delete operator for the class. –  CsTamas Jul 20 '09 at 9:01
1  
If you intend MyObject to be derivable (as I suspect from declaring the destructor virtual) constructor and destructor should be declared protected rather than private –  Kip9000 Jul 20 '09 at 11:26

I used a very carefully designed Create() factory method (static member of each class) to call a constructor and initializer pair in the same order as C# initializes types. It returned a shared_ptr to an instance of the type, guaranteeing a heap allocation. It proved reliable and consistent over time.

The trick: I generated my C++ class declarations from XML...

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I'm assuming you provided a custom deleter to shared_ptr, that included the call to the pre-destruction logic? –  Ben Voigt Feb 7 at 21:49

The best I can think of is for you to implement your own smart pointer with a static Create method that news up an instance and calls Initialize, and in its destructor calls AboutToDelete and then delete.

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Except for JavedPar's idea for the pre-destruction method, there is no pre-made solution to easily do two-phase construction/destruction in C++. The most obvious way to do this is to follow the Most Common Answer To Problems In C++: "Add another layer of indirection." You can wrap objects of this class hierarchy within another object. That object's constructors/destructor could then call these methods. Look into Couplien's letter-envelop idiom, for example, or use the smart pointer approach already suggested.

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http://www.research.att.com/~bs/wrapper.pdf This paper from Stroustrup will solve your problem.

I tested this under VS 2008 and on UBUNTU against g++ compiler. It worked fine.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

template<class T>

class Wrap
{
    typedef int (T::*Method)();
    T* p;
    Method _m;
public:
    Wrap(T*pp, Method m): p(pp), _m(m)  { (p->*_m)(); }
    ~Wrap() { delete p; }
};

class X
{
public:
    typedef int (*Method)();
    virtual int suffix()
    {
        cout << "X::suffix\n";
        return 1;
    }

    virtual void prefix()
    {
        cout << "X::prefix\n"; 
    }

    X() {  cout << "X created\n"; }

    virtual ~X() { prefix(); cout << "X destroyed\n"; }

};

class Y : public X
{
public:
    Y() : X() { cout << "Y created\n"; }
    ~Y() { prefix(); cout << "Y destroyed\n"; }
    void prefix()
    {
        cout << "Y::prefix\n"; 
    }

    int suffix()
    {
        cout << "Y::suffix\n";
        return  1;
    }
};

int main()
{
    Wrap<X> xx(new X, &X::suffix);
    Wrap<X>yy(new Y, &X::suffix);
}
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+1 Very interesting article. However This seems to only wrap standard methods not constructors and destructors. –  iain Jul 20 '09 at 12:47

I was stuck with the same problem, and after a bit of research, I believe there is not any standard solution.

The suggestions that I liked most are the ones provided in the Aleksandrescu et al. book "C++ coding standards" in the item 49.

Quoting them (fair use), you have several options:

  1. Just document it that you need a second method, as you did.
  2. Have another internal state (a boolean) that flags if post-construction has taken place
  3. Use virtual class semantics, in the sense that the constructor of the most-derived class decides which base class to use
  4. Use a factory function.

See his book for details.

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Haven't seen the answer yet, but base classes are only one way to add code in a class hierarchy. You can also create classes designed to be added to the other side of the hierarchy:

template<typename Base> 
class Derived : public Base {
    // You'd need C++0x to solve the forwarding problem correctly.
    Derived() : Base() {
        Initialize();
    }
    template<typename T>
    Derived(T const& t): Base(t) {
        Initialize();
    }
    //etc
private:
    Initialize();
};
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