Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a query like

SELECT tran_number
  FROM table_a WHERE customer_id IN
          (SELECT customer_id 
             FROM table_b
            WHERE customer_key = 89564
                  AND (   other_phn_area_code
                       || other_phnum_pfx_num
                       || other_phnum_sfx_num IN
                          (123456789)))
       AND phn_area_code || phnum_pfx_num || phnum_sfx_num IN (123456789)

The above code is working fine. The concern is with the inner query (copied inner query alone below)...

(SELECT customer_id 
                 FROM table_b
                WHERE customer_key = 89564
                      AND (   other_phn_area_code
                           || other_phnum_pfx_num
                           || other_phnum_sfx_num IN
                              (123456789)))

When i execute this query, i'm getting error as customer_id: invalid identifier. In real, table_b is not having any field named customer_id. If so, then how it is working, without any issue, when i use it as an inner query above.

Please help me to understand this.

Database details below

Oracle 11G Enterprise edition 11.2.0.2.0
PL/SQL Release 11.2.0.2.0
share|improve this question
    
What do you mean by "The above code is working fine." - it returns you some output, but what do you exactly want to achieve with this query? You're trying to get tran_number from rows whose customer_id satisfies - what? –  Miljen Mikic Jul 17 '12 at 8:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's a matter of scope. Oracle validates identifiers starting with the innermost sub-query and working outwards. If we add table aliases to your original query things might become clearer:

SELECT t1.tran_number 
  FROM table_a t1
  WHERE t1.customer_id IN 
          (SELECT t1.customer_id  
             FROM table_b t2 
            WHERE t2.customer_key = 89564 
                  AND (   t2.other_phn_area_code 
                       || t2.other_phnum_pfx_num 
                       || t2.other_phnum_sfx_num IN 
                          (123456789))) 
       AND t1.phn_area_code || t1.phnum_pfx_num || t1.phnum_sfx_num IN (123456789) 

In effect, the outer query is using the sub-querty as a test for EXISTS, i.e. just checking for the existence of a given value of CUSTOMER_KEY and those other columns. If this is not what you want then you should change the column name in the sub-query. (And that's a pretty good bet: you're probably getting puzzling results from the main query and that's why you're investigating the sub-query in isolation).

Using aliases in these scenarios is always good practice. If you had aliased the sub-query like this:

....
  WHERE t1.customer_id IN 
          (SELECT t2.customer_id  
             FROM table_b t2 
            WHERE t2.customer_key = 89564 
....

the error would have been immediately apparent.


The SQL Reference does explain the operation of scope in sub-queries, but it's hard to find. What it says is this:

"Oracle resolves unqualified columns in the subquery by looking in the tables named in the subquery and then in the tables named in the parent statement"

You can find a clearer explanation of scoping in the PL/SQL documentation; SQL sub-queries work in the same fashion. Find out more.

share|improve this answer

if the where condition of that inner select has a result, then the column customer_id from table_a will be selected. If not then it won't be selected. The outer select checks that with the in condition. That is like saying: "Only return something if the inner select return true."

share|improve this answer

Thats is a known bug with IN. If you use table alias you will get error

SELECT tran_number 
  FROM table_a WHERE customer_id IN 
          (SELECT b.customer_id  
             FROM table_b b
            WHERE customer_key = 89564 
                  AND (   other_phn_area_code 
                       || other_phnum_pfx_num 
                       || other_phnum_sfx_num IN 
                          (123456789))) 
       AND phn_area_code || phnum_pfx_num || phnum_sfx_num IN (123456789) 

Also use EXISTS to avoid this type of silent behaviour

SELECT tran_number 
  FROM table_a as t1 WHERE EXISTS  
          (SELECT *
             FROM table_b as b
            WHERE customer_key = 89564 
                  AND (   other_phn_area_code 
                       || other_phnum_pfx_num 
                       || other_phnum_sfx_num IN 
                          (123456789))
        AND b.customer_id  =t1.customer_id) 
       AND phn_area_code || phnum_pfx_num || phnum_sfx_num IN (123456789) 
share|improve this answer
4  
I don't think it's right to describe the correct action of the scoping rules as a "bug". More properly, scope allows us to introduce our own bugs if we don't pay attention. –  APC Jul 17 '12 at 13:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.