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I tried the solution below but I don't like it. I am looking for extending the class, not encapsulating a double[].

Thanks.

EDIT: We need to work with .NET 2.0

public class DoubleArray : IList, ICloneable
{

    protected double[] items;

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the last item in the array.
    /// </summary>
    public double Last { get { return items[items.Length-1]; } }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the number of items in the array.
    /// </summary>
    public int Length { get { return items.Length; } }

    /// <summary>
    /// Number of items constructor.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="len">Number of items</param>
    public DoubleArray(int len)
    {
        items = new double[len];
    }      

    public double this[int index]
    {
        get { return items[index]; }
        set { items[index] = value; }
    }

    public bool IsReadOnly
    {
        get { return items.IsReadOnly; }
    }

    public bool IsFixedSize
    {
        get { return items.IsFixedSize; }
    }

    public void CopyTo(Array array, int index)
    {
        items.CopyTo(array, index);
    }

    public IEnumerator GetEnumerator()
    {
        return items.GetEnumerator();
    }

    public object SyncRoot
    {
        get { return items.SyncRoot; }
    }

    public bool IsSynchronized
    {
        get { return items.IsSynchronized; }
    }

    object ICloneable.Clone()
    {
        return items.Clone();
    }

    #region ICollection and IList members implementation

    // hides this members from intellisense, see: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/10110205/how-does-selectedlistviewitemcollection-implement-ilist-but-not-have-add

    int ICollection.Count
    {
        get { return items.Length; }
    }

    int IList.Add(object value)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    bool IList.Contains(object value)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    void IList.Clear()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    int IList.IndexOf(object value)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    void IList.Insert(int index, object value)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    void IList.Remove(object value)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    void IList.RemoveAt(int index)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    object IList.this[int index]
    {
        get { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
        set { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
    } 

    #endregion

}
share|improve this question
    
As an implementation, I think that's going to be the simplest solution by far. How else can you get at the last property? You could, I suppose, track the last value separately by catching it in all methods that modify the underlying array but that's far too much work for little or no gain. The implementation here is probably as good as you're going to get working with what an array gives you. –  Rup Jul 17 '12 at 8:40
1  
One drawback of this approach is that you cannot pass the DoubleArray class as a parameter to a method that accepts double[] for example. –  Alberto Jul 17 '12 at 9:42
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5 Answers 5

Cant you use LINQ and just call

array.Last()

? (.NET 3.5 and above and "using System.Linq;")

.NET 2 Solution: (will fire IndexOutOfRange exc. in case of Count == 0)

public class MyList<T> : List<T>
{
    public T Last
    {
        get
        {
             return this[this.Count - 1];
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Forgot to mention we need to use .NET 2.0... –  Alberto Jul 17 '12 at 8:33
    
Does not answer the question since it doesn't show how to add it to the array. –  Tim Schmelter Jul 17 '12 at 8:33
    
You cant append to array. If you need adding, you end up implementing your own List<T>. –  Tomas Grosup Jul 17 '12 at 8:43
    
Yes, we are looking for a super-fast fixed size array... –  Alberto Jul 17 '12 at 9:47
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Since you can't Linq use, extension methods or other just add Utility class with a static method :

public static class ArrayUtility
{
    public static double Last(double[] items)
    {
        return items[items.Length -1]);
    }
}

Otherwise if you don't have to use an array, just use List<double>

If you go using List<double>. calling Add(YourNewDouble) will make it. If you want Queue or Stack behavior. Net has classes for that : Queue<T> , Stack.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this the same conclusion I ended up with too. –  Alberto Jul 17 '12 at 9:17
    
Extension methods are first in .NET 3.0 –  Tomas Grosup Jul 17 '12 at 9:39
    
Can you make me an example? –  Alberto Jul 17 '12 at 9:41
    
@TomasGrosup and? did I say they were in .Net 2.0? DownVoter any comments? –  MBen Jul 17 '12 at 9:43
1  
@Tomas No, they're in C# 3. As long as your compiler supports them, they will be compiled into a form that will still run on .NET 2. After all they're just syntactic-sugar for a function call to the static method. –  Rup Jul 17 '12 at 10:25
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is a solution that satisfies me. C# 3.0 Extensions can be used in .NET 2.0 simply adding this code:

#if NET20
namespace System.Runtime.CompilerServices
{
    [AttributeUsageAttribute(AttributeTargets.Assembly | AttributeTargets.Class | AttributeTargets.Method)]
     public class ExtensionAttribute : Attribute
    {
    }
}
#endif

Afterwards you can use the following extension method (and many others):

public static class DoubleArrayExtension
{
    // This is the extension method.
    // The first parameter takes the "this" modifier
    // and specifies the type for which the method is defined.       
    public static double Last(this double[] items)
    {
        return items[items.Length - 1];
    }

}

Thanks for all your hints and suggestions guys!

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use class List or you need realize same functional

if List is not suitable use static methos Array.Resize(param) and Array.Copy(param)

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Add using System.Linq; on the top of your file to be able to use Linq expressions in your code. items.Last() will return the last array item.

Here is a complete Linq methods list

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