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We currently have a LOGS TABLE divided with multiple logbooks numbers (column XLOG), and accessed within a limited time range.

The table is declared with a clustered 'natural' primary key, where XLOG is logbook identifier, XDATE is the timestamp, and XHW and XCELL are hardware identifiers ensuring unicity of log events :

 CREATE TABLE [dbo].[LOGS](
    [XDATE] [datetime] NOT NULL,
    [XHW] [nvarchar](3) NOT NULL,
    [XCELL] [nvarchar](3) NOT NULL,
    [XALIAS] [nvarchar](255) NULL,
    [XMESSAGE] [nvarchar](255) NULL,
    [XLOG] [int] NOT NULL,
 CONSTRAINT [PK_LOG] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED ([XLOG] ASC,[XDATE] ASC,[XHW] ASC,[XCELL] ASC)

The problem is a horrible execution plan occuring when accessing multiple logbooks with the same query (e.g. XLOG = 1 OR XLOG = 1002 in the sample query below), request #1 :

SELECT TOP 100 XDATE, XHW, XCELL, XMESSAGE, XLOG FROM LOGS
WHERE XDATE > '2012-06-12T00:00:00' AND XDATE < '2012-07-13T08:29:03.250'
AND (XLOG = 1 OR XLOG = 1002)
ORDER BY XDATE DESC, XLOG DESC

Edit: the 100 rows needed are not only from logbook #1, but from both logbooks, mixed, date ordered. That is what both queries return.

Statistics were updated before the tests.

The actual execution plan basically uses clustered index seek to fetch million rows of data with a predicate on XLOG and XDATE, (where it might only fetch 100 first/last rows since we have XLOG= and we TOP order by XDATE) actual plan

The details of the clustered index seek operation : tooltip

The expected execution plan is expected plan

I tried to rewrite the query, but could not find another way except with UNION ALL. The resulting query returns the same results (with a correct plan !) but it feels over-complicated (and cannot be adapted with a JOIN on XLOG, but that is not the question) request #2 :

WITH A AS (SELECT TOP 100 XDATE,  XHW, XCELL, XMESSAGE, XLOG FROM LOGS
WHERE XDATE > '2012-06-12T00:00:00' AND XDATE < '2012-07-13T08:29:03.250'
AND XLOG = 1
ORDER BY XDATE DESC),

B AS (SELECT TOP 100 XDATE,  XHW, XCELL, XMESSAGE, XLOG FROM LOGS
WHERE XDATE > '2012-06-12T00:00:00' AND XDATE < '2012-07-13T08:29:03.250'
AND XLOG = 1002
ORDER BY XDATE DESC)

SELECT TOP 100 * FROM (
    SELECT * FROM A
    UNION ALL 
    SELECT * FROM B 
) A
ORDER BY XDATE DESC, XLOG DESC

Question: What is wrong with request #1 ? how can it be rewritten/modified, to take the 'TOP' into account before attempting to sort millions of rows ? is another index, HINT, or some extra statistics needed to solve the problem ? am-I obliged to rewrite the queries like the request #2 ?

Edit: Quantitatively this table holds a dozen of logbooks, some have as few as one event per month, when others have millions of events per month.

This kind of query is the most used against this table (there are other variants with extra filters but they are not relevant for this problem -- except for complexity when using request #2).

Edit #2: I tried the solution of changing the clustered index to (XDATE,XLOG,...) instead of (XLOG,XDATE,...) -- nb: This composite primary key was designed this way because of the low selectivity of the column XLOG.

I tested this query on a copy of the production database, against a logbook with only a thousand of rows : the query plan generates LOTS OF I/O (it filters out only a few rows from that XLOG=12 out of a wide range of XDATEs). So this particular solution is not ok.

SELECT TOP 100 XDATE, XHW, XCELL, XMESSAGE, XLOG FROM LOGS
WHERE XDATE > '2012-06-12T00:00:00' AND XDATE < '2012-07-13T08:29:03.250'
AND (XLOG = 12 AND XALIAS LIKE 'KEYWORD%' )
ORDER BY XDATE DESC, XLOG DESC, XHW DESC, XCELL DESC

Nice query plan with lots of I/O

PS: By the way, we have the same behaviour with PostgreSQL 9.1 - so it is not database related, more probably a wrong query or a wrong table design.

share|improve this question
    
What indexes are on this table? –  podiluska Jul 17 '12 at 9:40
    
no other index except the primary key –  JB. Jul 17 '12 at 9:41
    
Is indexing an option? –  podiluska Jul 17 '12 at 9:42
    
Indexing is an option. that is not a solution I explored yet to solve this problem. –  JB. Jul 17 '12 at 9:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The issue is that the database does not know that the first 100 rows you want are all XLOG=1 so has to get all the possible XLOGS and then sort to find the first 100.

In your second case you have given more information or cut down the rows selected so the optimizer can just use the index for sorting.

Another way is to make the clustered index on XDATE DESC, XLOG DESC then the optimizer will know it does not have to sort and make the primary key a hash or other index. This ony makes sense if this query is the one most used.

share|improve this answer
    
"the database does not know that the first 100 rows you want are all XLOG=1" : No, no ! in fact they are absolutely not coming from only one logbook. In practice, the entries are mixed. –  JB. Jul 17 '12 at 16:07
    
Indeed, making the clustered index on XDATE, then XLOG makes sense. This will probably turn the query plan into a clustered index SCAN. –  JB. Jul 17 '12 at 16:13
    
It worries me however about retrieving data from a particular ancient logbook with very few rows, when other logbooks have lots of recent events. –  JB. Jul 17 '12 at 16:14

Order by XDate is causing the issue.The data has to be sorted by xdate to get top 100 and that is why you have this sort. Best way would be to have an index on xdate,xlog.But that would add overhead.That should be the option when other things are not working. Try below method.

SELECT TOP 100 XDATE, XHW, XCELL, XMESSAGE, XLOG
into #mytop100
FROM LOGS 
WHERE XDATE > '2012-06-12T00:00:00' AND XDATE < '2012-07-13T08:29:03.250' 
AND (XLOG = 1) 
ORDER BY XDATE DESC
union all
SELECT TOP 100 XDATE, XHW, XCELL, XMESSAGE, XLOG FROM LOGS 
WHERE XDATE > '2012-06-12T00:00:00' AND XDATE < '2012-07-13T08:29:03.250' 
AND (XLOG = 1002) 
ORDER BY XDATE DESC

select TOP 100 XDATE, XHW, XCELL, XMESSAGE, XLOG from #mytop 100 ORDER BY XDATE DESC, XLOG DESC 

also try the main sql withwout into #mytop100 and see whether it picks up a good plan. I bet it would but still check that.

share|improve this answer
    
Okay but this is equivalent to my query #2 ... enough information provided, it works ok –  JB. Jul 17 '12 at 16:05
    
with temp table it is a bit diff as the chances of transformatiuon by outer top are not there and thus the plan should be good enough.So which method worked for you? –  Gulli Meel Jul 17 '12 at 16:25
    
the CTA (query #2) works, and your temp table solution (a few typo corrected) works ok, too. But now imagine there are 10 logbooks to query, with about 10 extra filters (WHERE foo LIKE 'bar%'). Won't that look like a nightmare dynamic-sql query from hell ? –  JB. Jul 17 '12 at 16:37
1  
Then create a nonclsutered index on xdate.If you do not have any other type of queries or most of the queries are of this type and are executed lots of time.consider to have xdate as first key and xlog as key2 for your clustered index key –  Gulli Meel Jul 17 '12 at 16:56

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