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I found some C code on internet as:

int main() {
    int cookie;
    char buf[80];

    printf("buf: %08x cookie: %08x\n", &buf, &cookie);
    gets(buf);

    if (cookie == 0x41424344)
        printf("you win!\n");
}

I tried to run this code but it is giving runtime error. I am not sure why any runtime error is being thrown by the compiler as it is simply creating two variables and checking one condition of cookie value equality.

As per some answers stating that cookie variable is not initialized, that's why I am getting this error, so i modified the code as:

int main() {
    int cookie;
    char buf[80];

    printf("buf: %08x cookie: %08x\n", &buf, &cookie);
    gets(buf);

    if (cookie == 1)
        printf("you win!\n");
}

And guess what this time it din't give me any runtime error.

Source: http://community.coresecurity.com/~gera/InsecureProgramming/stack1.html

Thanks in Advance

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1  
Under exactly what circumstances does it give you a runtime error? What runtime error? –  Gareth McCaughan Jul 17 '12 at 9:45
    
What do you mean "why any runtime error is being thrown by the compiler"? By definition, an error from the compiler is not a runtime error. –  Gareth McCaughan Jul 17 '12 at 9:45
    
Have you tried running it in a debugger to see where the error is and what might have caused it? –  Joachim Pileborg Jul 17 '12 at 9:47
    
A couple of other notes. (1) At community.coresecurity.com/~gera/InsecureProgramming it says "the point is not to use any human help" -- you're supposed to be getting the idea from playing with the code. (2) Consider the possibility that the errors you're seeing are in fact the whole point :-). –  Gareth McCaughan Jul 17 '12 at 9:47
    
Hi Gareth, Thanks for response. Could you please check this: ideone.com/zhjbm –  codeomnitrix Jul 17 '12 at 10:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The code is fine. Many compilers "protect" you from the use of uninitialized variables, buffer overflows and such by throwing a runtime error. You can often turn this off through compiler flags.

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Hi nightcracker, I have modified the if condition and the second code snippet is running properly, but if the issue was with uninitialized variables, then the second snippet should not work. Thanks –  codeomnitrix Jul 17 '12 at 9:57

cookie hasn't been initialised

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Hi martin, I have modified the if condition and the second code snippet is running properly, but if the issue was with uninitialized variables, then the second snippet should not work. Thanks –  codeomnitrix Jul 17 '12 at 10:03

The compiler would generate a number of warnings on this code, for specifying x in printf (which expects integer type) but is given pointer.

This code should not give any run time error, except if you enter more than 79 characters as input. The point is that gets should not be used, since the buffer (which is allocated on stack in the code above) can be overrun by giving a large input, which spills into stack and overwrite the return address. Taking the advantage of that, the attacker can give malicious input (which points the return address to his code, which is also in the input) and execute arbitrary code on the system.

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Your "runtime error" is happening simply because your code doesn't return explicitly at the end of main. Stick return 0; at the end and ideone.com won't report an error. Not with sensible input, at least; of course the point of this thing is to see what you can do with not-sensible input.

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