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I am experimenting with testng. My goal is to have test methods in several classes and "supporting" methods for preparation and wrap-up of a bunch of tests in a separate class.

Another requirement is that in a test suite the supporting methods have to be called for multiple test parts. E.g. a first part containing testA and testB, and a second part containing testC and testD. This would result in the following steps:

support1, testA, testB, support2, support1, testC, testD, support2

My first approach that (partly) worked was to annotate all methods with @Test, use groups and define dependencies between groups, e.g. the test methods depend on a group "setUp", which is a group of one supporting method "support1" in the above example.

The problem with this approach is that the supporting methods count as tests, so the generated report shows the wrong number of "real" tests.

The next idea was to use @BeforeGroups and @AfterGroups, put the supporting methods in a group, and use group dependencies. The supporting methods should not be counted as tests any more. But I am stuck at the very beginning. For example I tried

@BeforeGroups (groups = {"setUp"})

for a setup method in class Support, and

@Test(groups = { "TestA" }, dependsOnGroups = { "setUp" })

in a "real" test class. This results in the following (simplyfied) error:

[testng] DependencyMap::Method "TestClass.testSomething()[...]" depends on nonexistent group "setUp"

Why is group "setUp" nonexistent? Did I overlook something?

Or is there another approach which works?

Thanks for your help!

Edit: The tests are started with Ant and I use a testng.xml like this:

<test name="TestA">
    <groups>
        <run>
            <include name="setUp" />
            <include name="TestA"/>
            <include name="tearDown"/>
        </run>
    </groups>
    <classes>
        <class name="seleniumtest.test.technical.Support"/>
        <class name="seleniumtest.test.business.TestClassA"/>
    </classes>
</test>
<test name="TestB">
    <groups>
        <run>
            <include name="setUp" />
            <include name="TestB"/>
            <include name="tearDown"/>
        </run>
    </groups>
    <classes>
        <class name="seleniumtest.test.technical.Support"/>
        <class name="seleniumtest.test.business.TestClassB"/>
    </classes>
</test>
share|improve this question
    
can you please share more code? It would be helpful to give a good answer! BTW, I usually have the setup methods and real tests as part of the same Class! –  Patton Jul 17 '12 at 9:55
    
Also can you please tell how you are running the tests? Are you using testng.xml to run the tests? –  Patton Jul 17 '12 at 10:01
    
The tests are run using a testng.xml file. I add an example to the question. –  prockel Jul 17 '12 at 10:20
    
Having supporting methods and test methods in the same class is not what I want due to the reuse of the supporting methods. –  prockel Jul 17 '12 at 10:23
    
Check my answer! –  Patton Jul 17 '12 at 11:22

3 Answers 3

I got the glitch!!

The problem is with the annotation

@Test(groups = { "TestA" }, dependsOnGroups = { "setUp" })

Basically your error message is trying to say that there is no @Test method with groupname as setUp!! Coming to your question, the solution is to modify annotation for the test method as below

 @Test(groups = { "TestA" })

And in the support method modify the annotation

  @BeforeGroups (groups = {"TestA"})

I ran a sample example with this set up

public class TestSupport {

    @BeforeGroups(groups = { "sample","sample1" })
    public void beforeTest() {
        System.out.println("Before test");
    }

    @AfterGroups(groups = { "sample","sample1" })
    public void afterTest() {
        System.out.println("after test");
    }

}

and with my Test class as

public class TestClassA {

    @Test(groups = { "sample" })
    public void superTestA() {
        System.out.println("This is the actual test");
    }

    @Test(groups = { "sample" })
    public void superTestB() {
        System.out.println("This is the another test under sample group");
    }

    @Test(groups = { "sample1" })
    public void superTest() {
        System.out.println("This is another test");
    }
}

and my testng.xml as shown below

<test name="sampletest" >
     <groups>
        <run>
            <include name="sample" />
            <include name="sample1" />

        </run>
    </groups>
    <classes>
        <class name="test.global.testng.TestClassA"/>
        <class name="test.global.testng.TestSupport"/>
    </classes>

  </test>

Now this is how the test runs: beforeGroups-> superTestA/superTestB ->afterGroups and beforeGroups-> superTest -> afterGroups and closes off

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your efforts. Your approach works for my small example test, therefore you get an upvote. But actually this is not how I would like it to have, because I have to put the supporting methods in each and every group of tests that should be run. I would like to configure this in the testng.xml file, not in the Java code. –  prockel Jul 17 '12 at 12:08
    
check my updated answer! Hope this gives you a better way to do –  Patton Jul 18 '12 at 6:37
    
Sorry, but it doesn't. It still has the drawback that you have to add the support methods to every group in the java code. And from the testng.xml content it's also not obvious at which points the support methods are executed. The approach with BeforeTest and AfterTest better fulfill my requirements. –  prockel Jul 18 '12 at 7:21
    
If you think so, you can go ahead and do the same.With no offence, I felt this to be a better way! –  Patton Jul 18 '12 at 7:35
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think I have come up with the solution I wanted.

What I need to use is @BeforeTest and @AfterTest instead of @BeforeGroups and @AfterGroups, respectively, in the support class:

@BeforeTest(groups = {"setUp"})
public void beforeTest() {[...]}

@AfterTest( groups = {"tearDown"})
public void afterTest() {[...]}

In the test class:

@Test(groups = { "TestA" })
public void testSomething() {[...]}

The dependsOnGroups is gone, as in Patton's approach.

The testng.xml is unchanged compared to my question. I.e. the tests can be configured in the testng.xml file, without having to change java code.

Moreover, this solution also gets rid of another problem of the BeforeGroups approach, at least as supposed by Patton (@Patton I do not mean to offend you). With the latter a test using several test groups does not run as intended, because the beforeTest() method would be run before any of the groups. E.g. if you have the following test (extract of testng.xml):

    <groups>
        <run>
            <include name="TestA"/>
            <include name="TestB"/>
        </run>
    </groups>

... the resulting steps of execution are:
beforeTest(), TestA, beforeTest(), TestB, afterTest().

Using the solution with BeforeTest, you would have the following test:

    <groups>
        <run>
            <include name="setUp" />
            <include name="TestA"/>
            <include name="TestB"/>
            <include name="tearDown"/>
        </run>
    </groups>

... the resulting steps of execution are:
setUp = beforeTest(), TestA, TestB, tearDown = afterTest().

share|improve this answer
package com.test.MySample;

import org.testng.annotations.*; 

public class TestNGTest1 {    

    @BeforeTest   
    public void BeforeTest() {         
        System.out.println("@BeforeTest");
    }

    @BeforeClass    
    public void BeforeClass() {         
        System.out.println("@BeforeClass");
    }      

    @BeforeGroups  (groups = {"My group"}) 
    public void BeforeGroups() {       
        System.out.println("@BeforeGroups");
    }

    @BeforeGroups  (groups = {"My group1"}) 
    public void BeforeGroups1() {       
        System.out.println("@BeforeGroups1");
    }

    @AfterGroups  (groups = {"My group1"}) 
    public void AfterGroups1() {       
        System.out.println("@AfterGroups1");
    }

    @BeforeMethod    
    public void BeforeMethod() {         
        System.out.println("@BeforeMethod");     
    } 

    @Test(groups = {"My group"})     
    public void test1() {         
        System.out.println("test1");     
    } 

    @Test (groups = {"My group", "My group1"})    
    public void test2() {         
        System.out.println("test2");     
    }

    @AfterMethod    
    public void AfterMethod() {         
        System.out.println("@AfterMethod");     
    } 

    @AfterGroups  (groups = {"My group"}) 
    public void AfterGroups() {       
        System.out.println("@AfterGroups");
    }

    @AfterClass    
    public void AfterClass() {         
        System.out.println("@AfterClass");
    }  

    @AfterTest   
    public void AfterTest() {         
        System.out.println("@AfterTest");
    }
} 
share|improve this answer

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