Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am learning recursion coding, and I tried a test for myself- the 8-queen puzzle. I check if there is conflict at each step, and backtrack if there is a conflict. But it seems that my code stops backtracking prematurely.


First, I have:

0000
0000
0000
0000

then it changes to:

1000
0000
0000
0000

and then it changes to:

1100
0000
0000
0000

Now the conflict function returns True, and the function stops. Why isn't it calling solve_queen(grid) with:

1010
0000
0000
0000

I think there is something wrong with the two for loops in solve_queen(grid) but I can't get exactly where it went wrong.

My code follows.


import copy

q4_zero = [[0,0,0,0],
           [0,0,0,0],
           [0,0,0,0],
           [0,0,0,0]]


def format_failed(grid):
    if len(grid) != len(grid[0]):
        return True
    elif len(grid) < 4:
        return True
    return False

def row_conflict(grid):
    for row in grid:
        if row.count(1) > 1:
            return True
    return False 

def col_conflict(grid):
    new_grid = [[r[col] for r in grid] for col in range(len(grid[0]))]
    return row_conflict(grid)

def oblique_conflict(grid):
    i_lst = []
    j_lst = []
    row_count = len(grid)
    for i in xrange(row_count):
        if grid[i].count(1) > 0:
            j = grid[i].index(1)
            i_lst.append(i)
            j_lst.append(j)

    for k in xrange(len(i_lst)):
        for m in xrange(len(i_lst) - 1):
            if abs(i_lst[m] - i_lst[m + 1]) == abs(j_lst[m] - j_lst[m + 1]):
                return True

    return False


def conflict(grid):
    if format_failed(grid):
        return True
    elif row_conflict(grid):
        return True
    elif col_conflict(grid):
        return True
    elif oblique_conflict(grid):
        return True
    return False


def solve_queen(__grid):

    res = conflict(__grid)

    if res is True:
        return res

    grid = copy.deepcopy(__grid)
    N = len(grid)

    for i in xrange(N):
        for j in xrange(N):
            if grid[i][j] == 0:
                grid[i][j] = 1
                final_answer = solve_queen(grid)
                if final_answer is not True:
                    return final_answer

                return True

    return grid

print solve_queen(q4_zero)
share|improve this question
1  
Please give us the exact symptoms: What exactly goes wrong? What result is expected and what you are actually getting? Did you try to debug it? (using print statements in "suspicious" places for example?) –  amit Jul 17 '12 at 10:02
1  
I happened to write a solution to the general(N-queen) version of this problem just a few hours ago. It's quite simple(35 lines) and uses a backtracking solution. I've posted a gist of it here, perhaps that could be of some help? –  Nolen Royalty Jul 17 '12 at 10:18
    
@NolenRoyalty Thanks, but what is annoying me is where is my code wrong? why couldn't it backtrack correctly... –  shengy Jul 17 '12 at 10:22

3 Answers 3

for i in xrange(N):
        for j in xrange(N):
            if grid[i][j] == 0:
                grid[i][j] = 1
                final_answer = solve_queen(grid)
                if final_answer is not True:
                    return final_answer

                return True

Assume solve_queen(grid) is returning True (it is indeed the case) when grid is:

1100
0000
0000
0000

So, you set final_answer = True.
Since final_answer is not True is not met, you skip this line, and go directly to the next line:

return True

So, your backtracking solution is actually stopping the recursion after the first failure because of this line.

What to do?
Tip: You should pre define a base clause - when the recursion will hold (hint: after you have placed n queens - and return an answer in this cases.
If you find the solution wrong - don't break it, just keep iterating. a True should be returned if you exhausted all possibilities only (so the return True statement should be outside the scope of the for loops).

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I found this problem too, but how can I fix this? –  shengy Jul 17 '12 at 10:48
    
@shengy: See edit, under "what to do" –  amit Jul 17 '12 at 10:51
    
I didn't find "what to do".... –  shengy Jul 17 '12 at 10:54
    
@shengy: refresh the page, it is an edit extending the original answer –  amit Jul 17 '12 at 10:55
    
I got it:) thanks –  shengy Jul 17 '12 at 11:05

You never set grid cells back to zero. How is backtracking supposed to work then?

Furthermore, you have a nested loop in solve_queen(), but solve_queen() is supposed to be a recursive function. Either use the loop or use recursion.

Besides, you don't have a halting condition in solve_queen(). Apart from conflict(), you need a function is_solved() that will tell you when to stop:

if not is_solved(grid):
    return solve_queen(grid)
else return grid

On a sidenote, the queens problem is more efficiently represented as an array of integers, where the index denotes the row and the value denotes the column. E.g., grid[3] will tell you the associated column of the queen in row 4.

Using this representation, it is much easier to check for conflicts. Besides, you save space, which might come in handy if you go from 4 queens to 10 billion. ;-)

Finally, you should definitely read up about recursion and backtracking. I doubt that you actually understand either of these concepts.

share|improve this answer
    
Could you provide a good link for recursion and backtracking? –  shengy Jul 17 '12 at 10:51
    
@shengy, the N-queens problem is probably the most well-known example of backtracking. Just Google it, and you can find solutions and explanations in many, many languages. –  David Cain Jul 18 '12 at 8:11

I don't know if this gonna help but... have you tried with a different data representation?

The 8-queen problem doesn't need the whole 8x8 grid. Since each queen will go in a diferent row, you just need an 8-array with the queen's column.

I don't know Python, so I can't help you in that point, but it's possible that changing your data format you get throught your problem.

share|improve this answer
    
I just want to try to write a recursion program to understand it a bit more... and it hurts me. –  shengy Jul 17 '12 at 10:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.