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I am a beginner. I was working around with pointer when I found something strange:

#include<stdio.h>

int* fun(int*);

int main()
{
    int i=4,*j;
    j=fun(&i);
    printf("%d ",*j);//gives correct answer -> how??
    printf("%d",*j);//gives incorrect answer
}

int* fun(int *i)
{
    int k;
    k=*i;
    return (&k);
}

In main(), I am usingprintf("%d ",*j);` 2 times. First one is giving me right answer, but second one is not. Why?

but this is working fine- ‎#include int *func();

int main()
{
int *p;
p=func();
printf("%u", p);
printf("\n%d", *p);
printf("\n%d", *p);
printf("\n%d", *p);
printf("\n%d", *p);

}

int* func()
{
int i=10;
printf("%u", &i);
printf("\n%d", i);
return (&i);
}
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possible duplicate of Can a local variable's memory be accessed outside its scope? –  Bo Persson Jul 17 '12 at 12:26

2 Answers 2

You are invoking undefined behavior by returning a pointer to a local variable. After the function fun returns, the space occupied by the local variable k is not valid anymore. Actually the space on the stack previously used by fun is probably overwritten by the first call to printf.

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I have added a new code which is working fine. In this I have defined variable as local in func again, but have assigned it a value there only. –  bhavneet Jul 17 '12 at 11:37
    
@bhavneet If it works, it's because you are lucky, not because it really works. It's still undefined behavior to return addresses to local variables. –  Joachim Pileborg Jul 17 '12 at 11:44

You're returning the address of a variable that's local to fun; once fun exits, that variable no longer exists, and the pointer is no longer valid. Strictly speaking, the behavior is undefined.

What's most likely happening is that the memory location that k used to occupy gets overwritten after the first call to printf.

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I have added a new code which is working fine. In this I have defined variable as local in func again, but have assigned it a value there only. –  bhavneet Jul 17 '12 at 12:28
1  
It appears to be working fine; that's one of the possible outcomes of invoking undefined behavior. Once func exits, i no longer exists, and that memory location will eventually be overwritten by something else. What you are doing is a coding error, period. –  John Bode Jul 17 '12 at 13:47

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