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I'm trying to use two packages and call functions from one to other, but I've got this error:

Undefined subroutine &module2::method_1_2 called at module2.pm line 20.

Is there any way to call functions from one package to the other one without getting this error?

Thanks in advance.

xabi

exec error:

./test.pl
method_1_1
method_2_1
method_2_2
Undefined subroutine &module2::method_1_2 called at module2.pm line 20.

Sample code (test.pl):

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use module1;
use module2;

method_1_1();
method_2_2();

module1.pm

package module1;

use strict;

use module2;

require Exporter;
use vars qw(@ISA @EXPORT);
@ISA     = qw(Exporter);
@EXPORT  = qw( method_1_1 method_1_2 );

sub method_1_1
{
   print "method_1_1\n";
   method_2_1();
}

sub method_1_2
{
   print "method_1_2\n";
}

1;

module2.pm:

package module2;

use strict;

use module1;

require Exporter;
use vars qw(@ISA @EXPORT);
@ISA     = qw(Exporter);
@EXPORT  = qw( method_2_1 method_2_2 );

sub method_2_1
{
   print "method_2_1\n";
}

sub method_2_2
{
   print "method_2_2\n";
   method_1_2();
}

1;
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

The problem is that the very first thing module1 does is to use module2. That means all of module2 is read and executed while module1 is still compiling.

The next thing to happen is that module2 does use module1. Because module1 has been found and put into %INC Perl doesn't execute it again, and just does module1->import to fetch the exported symbols.

But of course module1 has in fact barely started compiling, and @module1::EXPORT doesn't even exist, never mind about its two subroutines. That makes Exporter import nothing at all into module2, so when it comes to make the call method_1_2() it knows nothing about it.

The cleanest way to fix this is to do the import after the compilation (including all the use statements and BEGIN blocks) but before runtime. Perl's INIT block is ideal for this, and we can get the code working by changing the modules to the form below. I have shown only module2 here, as the pattern of calls means this is all that's needed to fix this particular problem, but the general case needs the equivalent change to all cooperating modules.

package module2;

use strict;
use warnings;

use module1;
INIT { module1->import }

use base 'Exporter';
our @EXPORT  = qw( method_2_1 method_2_2 );

sub method_2_1 {
   print "method_2_1\n";
}

sub method_2_2 {
   print "method_2_2\n";
   method_1_2();
}

1;
share|improve this answer

The problem is that you assign to @EXPORT after it was already used. The following is copied from Mini-Tutorial: Mutual Use of Exporting Modules


[ The need to use this technique is a very strong indicator of a design flaw in your system, but I recognize that the resources are not always available to fix design flaws. ]

If ModA uses ModB, ModB uses ModA, and ModA or ModB imports symbols from the other, one needs to pay attention to code execution order. The best way I've found to avoid problems is to setup Exporter before loading any other module.

# ModA.pm

package ModA;

use strict;
use warnings;

use Exporter qw( import );
BEGIN { our @EXPORT_OK = qw( ... ); }

use This;
use ModB;
use That;

...

1;

# ModB.pm

package ModB;

use strict;
use warnings;

use Exporter qw( import );
BEGIN { our @EXPORT_OK = qw( ... ); }

use This;
use ModA;
use That;

...

1;
share|improve this answer

Interesting, I am not sure why method_1_2 isn't being exported into the module2 namespace, but you can get around this by explicitly referencing the package:

module1.pm

package module1;

use strict;
use warnings;

use module2 (); #don't import methods

use base 'Exporter';
our @EXPORT  = qw( method_1_1 method_1_2 );

sub method_1_1
{
   print "method_1_1\n";
   module2::method_2_1();
}

sub method_1_2
{
   print "method_1_2\n";
}

1;

module2.pm

package module2;

use strict;
use warnings;

use module1 (); #don't import methods

use base 'Exporter';
our @EXPORT  = qw( method_2_1 method_2_2 );

sub method_2_1
{
   print "method_2_1\n";
}

sub method_2_2
{
   print "method_2_2\n";
   module1::method_1_2();
}

1;

Okay, I think I see what is going on, but take this with a grain of salt. The use function is effectively a BEGIN block and BEGIN blocks run as soon as they are parsed, so the code looks like this in execution order.

  1. perl starts parsing test.pl
  2. it sees use module1; so it loads module1.pm and starts parsing it
  3. perl sees use module2; in module1.pm so it loads module2.pm and starts parsing it
  4. At this point, the functions in module1 do not yet exist, so they can't be imported
  5. parsing continues

Something Borodin said tipped me off to the best solution: "@module1::EXPORT doesn't even exist". The problem here is that the @EXPORT variable doesn't exist. This can be fixed by putting it in a BEGIN block:

module1.pm

package module1;

use strict;
use warnings;

use base 'Exporter';
BEGIN {
    our @EXPORT  = qw( method_1_1 method_1_2 );
}

use module2;

sub method_1_1
{
   print "method_1_1\n";
   module2::method_2_1();
}

sub method_1_2
{
   print "method_1_2\n";
}

1;

module2.pm

package module2;

use strict;
use warnings;

use base 'Exporter';
BEGIN {
    our @EXPORT  = qw( method_2_1 method_2_2 );
}

use module1;

sub method_2_1
{
   print "method_2_1\n";
}

sub method_2_2
{
   print "method_2_2\n";
   method_1_2();
}

1;

IMPORTANT NOTE: I do not believe prototypes in module1 will be honored in any of these cases (and I don't see how they could be since module2 gets compiled before module1, so it can't know the prototypes exist). This is yet another argument to never use prototypes.

share|improve this answer
    
Although this quirk of perl still is quite weird... –  amon Jul 17 '12 at 13:06
    
@Borodin I don't understand your comment. Yes, the calls to require in the modules are not necessary in this specific case (because the script is calling use for both modules), but it safer to have them and they turn into a simple hash lookup, so there is no real penalty. –  Chas. Owens Jul 17 '12 at 13:50
    
The BEGIN { our @EXPORT = ... } way doesn't work for me at the moment. I didn't actually expect it to as nothing has been declared at that point in module1 so the stash entries for the subroutines is empty. –  Borodin Jul 17 '12 at 13:52
    
@Chas: I mean that without the use calls in test.pl, the two modules are first being compiled during INIT so the same race effect happens then instead. You need to compile everything and only then do the imports. –  Borodin Jul 17 '12 at 13:57
    
@Borodin It works for me in Perl 5.14.0, which Perl are you using? –  Chas. Owens Jul 17 '12 at 13:57

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