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You all do this:

public void Proc(object parameter)
{
    if (parameter == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("parameter");

    // Main code.
}

Jon Skeet once mentioned that he sometimes uses the extension to do this check so you can do just:

parameter.ThrowIfNull("parameter");

So I come of with two implementations of this extension and I don't know which one is the best.

First:

internal static void ThrowIfNull<T>(this T o, string paramName) where T : class
{
    if (o == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException(paramName);
}

Second:

internal static void ThrowIfNull(this object o, string paramName)
{
    if (o == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException(paramName);
}

What do you think?

share|improve this question
1  
It is almost never a good idea to create an extension method that extends object/everything. . stackoverflow.com/a/7652359/284240 –  Tim Schmelter Jul 17 '12 at 12:07
1  
Is it safe to recurse like that? Won't that recurse infinitely? –  Rup Jul 17 '12 at 12:07
    
No, it will not. –  AgentFire Jul 17 '12 at 12:07
2  
Surely it's pretty clear: The first line of the function calls the function again before any conditional logic is involved.. how is that not infinite? –  Simon Whitehead Jul 17 '12 at 12:29
1  
The question has been fixed. –  AgentFire Jul 17 '12 at 12:43

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'd use internal static void ThrowIfNull<T>(this T o, string paramName) where T : class. I won't use internal static void ThrowIfNull(this object o, string paramName) because it might do boxing.

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1  
The only downside with that choice is you won't be able to test Nullable<T> items. –  Adam Houldsworth Jul 17 '12 at 12:18
    
@AgentFire From the compiler: "The type 'int?' must be a reference type in order to use it as parameter 'T' in the generic type or method" in VS2010, so something has changed. –  Adam Houldsworth Jul 17 '12 at 12:22
1  
Why would you test for null a Nullable in this context? If there is such a need then the function needs redesign –  Vasile Mare Jul 17 '12 at 12:23
    
@AdamHouldsworth Try F6. But maybe the feature is VS2012-only. However, framework 4.0 is referenced over here. –  AgentFire Jul 17 '12 at 12:23
2  
The impact of boxing is also negligible, people forget it is actually quite optimised from .NET pre-generics days. Though it can increase GC pressure. I tend to find "boxing" isn't a valid catch-all excuse these days, boxing is perfectly acceptable in some circumstances and not in others. –  Adam Houldsworth Jul 17 '12 at 12:38

I tend to stick to the ubiquitous Guard class for this:

static class Guard
{
    public static void AgainstNulls(object parameter, string name = null)
    {
        if (parameter == null) 
            throw new ArgumentNullException(name ?? "guarded argument was null");

        Contract.EndContractBlock(); // If you use Code Contracts.
    }
}

Guard.AgainstNulls(parameter, "parameter");

And shy away from extending object, plus to the naked eye a method call on a null object seems nonsensical (although I know it is perfectly valid to have null method calls against extension methods).

As for which is best, I'd use neither. They both have infinite recursion. I'd also not bother guarding the message parameter, make it optionally null. Your first solution will also not support Nullable<T> types as the class constraint blocks it.

Our Guard class also has the Contract.EndContractBlock() call after it for when we decide to enable Code Contracts, as it fits the "if-then-throw" structure that is required.

This is also a perfect candidate for a PostSharp aspect.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm in two minds about this; I think I prefer Jon Skeet's explicit NonNullable<T> contract as that makes it explicit at creation time that I never want T to be nullable, whereas I might forget Guard.AgainstNulls, or it might be hidden inside another method or similar. Agree totally with your PostSharp aspect though, so +1 + -0.5 + 1 (with Math.Floor thrown in) results in... +1 ;-) –  dash Jul 17 '12 at 12:18
    
I feel it too complicated. –  AgentFire Jul 17 '12 at 12:22
    
I think @AgentFire meant NotNullable<T>. On the other hand, some people just prefer Extension syntax over explicit method calls. –  dash Jul 17 '12 at 12:23
    
@dash If something is so important that it should be baked into a contract for it, then there should likely be a test for it too - meaning that if you forgot to guard against nulls, the test would also remind you. –  Adam Houldsworth Jul 17 '12 at 12:24
    
If only everyone wrote tests for every possible usage :-) I do actually think NotNullable<T> is more explicit - I've decided, when creating this that it's never going to be null, whereas Guard.AgainstNulls is I've created something but then I need to remember that I never want it null; it's largely a semantic difference, and I did like your answer! There's definitely an element of coding style there too, though. –  dash Jul 17 '12 at 12:26

I would do this way to avoid hardcoding parameter names. Tomorrow it can change, and you have more work then:

public static void ThrowIfNull<T>(this T item) where T : class
{
    if (item == null)
        return;

    var param = typeof(T).GetProperties()[0];
    if (param.GetValue(item, null) == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException(param.Name);
}

And call it:

public void Proc(object parameter)
{
    new { parameter }.ThrowIfNull(); //you have to call it this way.

    // Main code.
}

The performance hit is trivial (on my mediocre computer it ran for 100000 times just under 25 ms), much faster than Expression based approach seen typically

ThrowIfNull(() => resource);

One such here. But surely don't use this if you cant afford that much hit..

You can also extend this for properties of objects.

new { myClass.MyProperty1 }.ThrowIfNull();

You can cache property values to improve performance further as property names don't change during runtime.

See this question additionally: Resolving a parameter name at runtime

share|improve this answer

Second one seems more elegant way of handling the same. In this case you can put restriction on every managed object.

internal static void ThrowIfNull(this object o, string paramName)
{
       if (o == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException(paramName);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I could do that with the typed parameter as well. –  AgentFire Jul 17 '12 at 12:26

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