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As part of some WSGI middleware I want to write a python class that wraps an iterator to implement a close method on the iterator.

This works fine when I try it with an old-style class, but throws a TypeError when I try it with a new-style class. What do I need to do to get this working with a new-style class?

Example:

class IteratorWrapper1:

    def __init__(self, otheriter):
        self._iterator = otheriter
        self.next = otheriter.next

    def __iter__(self):
        return self

    def close(self):
        if getattr(self._iterator, 'close', None) is not None:
            self._iterator.close()
        # other arbitrary resource cleanup code here

class IteratorWrapper2(object):

    def __init__(self, otheriter):
        self._iterator = otheriter
        self.next = otheriter.next

    def __iter__(self):
        return self

    def close(self):
        if getattr(self._iterator, 'close', None) is not None:
            self._iterator.close()
        # other arbitrary resource cleanup code here

if __name__ == "__main__":
    for i in IteratorWrapper1(iter([1, 2, 3])):
        print i

    for j in IteratorWrapper2(iter([1, 2, 3])):
        print j

Gives the following output:

1
2
3
Traceback (most recent call last):
  ...
TypeError: iter() returned non-iterator of type 'IteratorWrapper2'
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4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

What you're trying to do makes sense, but there's something evil going on inside Python here.

class foo(object):
    c = 0
    def __init__(self):
        self.next = self.next2

    def __iter__(self):
        return self

    def next(self):
        if self.c == 5: raise StopIteration
        self.c += 1
        return 1

    def next2(self):
        if self.c == 5: raise StopIteration
        self.c += 1
        return 2

it = iter(foo())
# Outputs: <bound method foo.next2 of <__main__.foo object at 0xb7d5030c>>
print it.next
# 2
print it.next()
# 1?!
for x in it:
    print x

foo() is an iterator which modifies its next method on the fly--perfectly legal anywhere else in Python. The iterator we create, it, has the method we expect: it.next is next2. When we use the iterator directly, by calling next(), we get 2. Yet, when we use it in a for loop, we get the original next, which we've clearly overwritten.

I'm not familiar with Python internals, but it seems like an object's "next" method is being cached in tp_iternext (http://docs.python.org/c-api/typeobj.html#tp_iternext), and then it's not updated when the class is changed.

This is definitely a Python bug. Maybe this is described in the generator PEPs, but it's not in the core Python documentation, and it's completely inconsistent with normal Python behavior.

You could work around this by keeping the original next function, and wrapping it explicitly:

class IteratorWrapper2(object):
    def __init__(self, otheriter):
        self.wrapped_iter_next = otheriter.next
    def __iter__(self):
        return self
    def next(self):
        return self.wrapped_iter_next()

for j in IteratorWrapper2(iter([1, 2, 3])):
    print j

... but that's obviously less efficient, and you should not have to do that.

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Have you raised a bug at bugs.python.org? –  Piotr Dobrogost Sep 29 '12 at 17:00
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There are a bunch of places where CPython take surprising shortcuts based on class properties instead of instance properties. This is one of those places.

Here is a simple example that demonstrates the issue:

def DynamicNext(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.next = lambda: 42

And here's what happens:

>>> instance = DynamicNext()
>>> next(instance)
…
TypeError: DynamicNext object is not an iterator
>>>

Now, digging into the CPython source code (from 2.7.2), here's the implementation of the next() builtin:

static PyObject *
builtin_next(PyObject *self, PyObject *args)
{
    …
    if (!PyIter_Check(it)) {
        PyErr_Format(PyExc_TypeError,
            "%.200s object is not an iterator",
            it->ob_type->tp_name);
        return NULL;
    }
    …
}

And here's the implementation of PyIter_Check:

#define PyIter_Check(obj) \
    (PyType_HasFeature((obj)->ob_type, Py_TPFLAGS_HAVE_ITER) && \
     (obj)->ob_type->tp_iternext != NULL && \
     (obj)->ob_type->tp_iternext != &_PyObject_NextNotImplemented)

The first line, PyType_HasFeature(…), is, after expanding all the constants and macros and stuff, equivalent to DynamicNext.__class__.__flags__ & 1L<<17 != 0:

>>> instance.__class__.__flags__ & 1L<<17 != 0
True

So that check obviously isn't failing… Which must mean that the next check — (obj)->ob_type->tp_iternext != NULLis failing.

In Python, this line is roughly (roughly!) equivalent to hasattr(type(instance), "next"):

>>> type(instance)
__main__.DynamicNext
>>> hasattr(type(instance), "next")
False

Which obviously fails because the DynamicNext type doesn't have a next method — only instances of that type do.

Now, my CPython foo is weak, so I'm going to have to start making some educated guesses here… But I believe they are accurate.

When a CPython type is created (that is, when the interpreter first evaluates the class block and the class' metaclass' __new__ method is called), the values on the type's PyTypeObject struct are initialized… So if, when the DynamicNext type is created, no next method exists, the tp_iternext, field will be set to NULL, causing PyIter_Check to return false.

Now, as the Glenn points out, this is almost certainly a bug in CPython… Especially given that correcting it would only impact performance when either the object being tested isn't iterable or dynamically assigns a next method (very approximately):

#define PyIter_Check(obj) \
    (((PyType_HasFeature((obj)->ob_type, Py_TPFLAGS_HAVE_ITER) && \
       (obj)->ob_type->tp_iternext != NULL && \
       (obj)->ob_type->tp_iternext != &_PyObject_NextNotImplemented)) || \
      (PyObject_HasAttrString((obj), "next") && \
       PyCallable_Check(PyObject_GetAttrString((obj), "next"))))

Edit: after a little bit of digging, the fix would not be this simple, because at least some portions of the code assume that, if PyIter_Check(it) returns true, then *it->ob_type->tp_iternext will exist… Which isn't necessarily the case (ie, because the next function exists on the instance, not the type).

SO! That's why surprising things happen when you try to iterate over a new-style instance with a dynamically assigned next method.

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Would you care to raise it as a bug in CPython? –  Piotr Dobrogost Sep 30 '12 at 7:41
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Looks like built-in iter doesn't check for next callable in an instance but in a class and IteratorWrapper2 doesn't have any next. Below is simpler version of your problem

class IteratorWrapper2(object):

    def __init__(self, otheriter):
        self.next = otheriter.next

    def __iter__(self):
        return self

it=iter([1, 2, 3])
myit = IteratorWrapper2(it)

IteratorWrapper2.next # fails that is why iter(myit) fails
iter(myit) # fails

so the solution would be to return otheriter in __iter__

class IteratorWrapper2(object):

    def __init__(self, otheriter):
        self.otheriter = otheriter

    def __iter__(self):
        return self.otheriter

or write your own next, wrapping inner iterator

class IteratorWrapper2(object):

    def __init__(self, otheriter):
        self.otheriter = otheriter

    def next(self):
        return self.otheriter.next()

    def __iter__(self):
        return self

Though I do not understand why doesn't iter just use the self.next of instance.

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Just return the iterator. That's what __iter__ is for. It makes no sense to try to monkey-patch the object into being in iterator and return it when you already have an iterator.

EDIT: Now with two methods. Once, monkey patching the wrapped iterator, second, kitty-wrapping the iterator.

class IteratorWrapperMonkey(object):

    def __init__(self, otheriter):
        self.otheriter = otheriter
        self.otheriter.close = self.close

    def close(self):
        print "Closed!"

    def __iter__(self):
        return self.otheriter

class IteratorWrapperKitten(object):

    def __init__(self, otheriter):
        self.otheriter = otheriter

    def __iter__(self):
        return self

    def next(self):
        return self.otheriter.next()

    def close(self):
        print "Closed!"

class PatchableIterator(object):

    def __init__(self, inp):
        self.iter = iter(inp)

    def next(self):
        return self.iter.next()

    def __iter__(self):
        return self

if __name__ == "__main__":
    monkey = IteratorWrapperMonkey(PatchableIterator([1, 2, 3]))
    for i in monkey:
        print i
    monkey.close()

    kitten = IteratorWrapperKitten(iter([1, 2, 3]))
    for i in kitten:
        print i
    kitten.close()

Both methods work both with new and old-style classes.

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Thanks for you answer! Perhaps I should have given more context: the reason I have a wrapper class at all is so that I can add a close method to the returned iterator object, and just returning the original iterator doesn't give me a chance to do that. –  ollyc Jul 20 '09 at 8:36
    
I can think of several cases where I might want to do this. They're all contrived (which is to say, I've never actually had to do this), so I won't bother listing them, but this is a perfectly valid thing to want to do. –  Glenn Maynard Jul 20 '09 at 8:44
    
Also, this is not monkey patching. Monkey patching is modifying a class's methods from outside of the class itself, not a class modifying its own methods. –  Glenn Maynard Jul 20 '09 at 8:47
    
+1: Just return the iterator. The close is NOT part of iteration. It's part of the context, managed via a WITH statement. –  S.Lott Jul 20 '09 at 9:57
1  
@Glenn: Yeah, I guess you are right. Although dynamic changes of a class is usually kinda ugly too, even if it's not really monkey patching. –  Lennart Regebro Jul 20 '09 at 10:07
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