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I have two Interfaces, one of them is a generic one, allowing only Types that derive from the second Interface. They look like this:

public interface IProvider<T> where T : IContent
{
    T getContent(int i);
    void addContent(T content);
}
public interface IContent
{
    string whatIAm();
}

Of course my real Interfaces are more complex but it is enought to show what my problem is. Now i have for each interface a concrete class:

public class Provider : IProvider<FileContent> 
{
    public FileContent getContent(int i)
    {
        return null;
    }
    public void addContent(FileContent content)
    {
    }
}

public class FileContent : IContent{
    public string whatIAm(){
        return "FileContent";
    }
}

And in my code i want to work with the reference type "IProvider" but the cast goes wrong... Please look at this example:

 static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Provider p = new Provider(); //works
        IProvider<FileContent> pp = p as IProvider<FileContent>; //also works
        IProvider<IContent> ppp = pp as IProvider<IContent>; //fails :(
    }

ppp is always null. What do i have to change that this cast is working? Thanks in advance.

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1  
This could be a duplicate of Casting an object to a generic interface. –  Paolo Moretti Jul 17 '12 at 12:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The type argument must match exactly. IProvider<IContent> is a different type than IProvider<FileContent>, there is no inheritance between them.

Imagine you have an IProvider<IContent> ppp  from your IProvider<FileContent> and a developer tries ppp.addContent(someOtherContentThatIsNoFileContent). That statement is valid for IProvider<IContent>, but it would break type safety, so not allowing such a conversion is the right thing to do. 

Covariance and Contravariance for generic type parameters allow something like this under certain circumstances, but since your interface uses the type parameter both as in- and output parameter, this won't apply to it the way it is declared right now.

EDIT: Look at IEnumerable's definition:

public interface IEnumerable<out T> 

So you know IEnumerable uses T only as output parameter (you can't add items, only enumerate them), and the out keyword specifies that T is covariant. So you can do

IEnumerable<String> strings = new List<String>();
IEnumerable<Object> objects = strings;

If you want to do this, you would have to remove the add method from your interface. Same applies for input parameters and the in keyword on generic type parameters. 

Your interface would then look like this:

public interface IProvider<out T> where T : IContent
{
    T getContent(int i);
}
share|improve this answer
    
exactly this is what i want to reach. As i already wrote in the question: What do i have to change that this cast is working? I already tried to remove one of the two methods in IProvider Interface - but it doesn't matter which one i remove, the cast still does not work :( –  user1531730 Jul 17 '12 at 12:46
    
@user1531730 The comment was getting too long, I updated my answer. –  Botz3000 Jul 17 '12 at 12:51
    
Thanks thats the trick! :D Question solved! –  user1531730 Jul 17 '12 at 12:53
    
@user1531730 Good to hear. :) I guess you'll need to split your interface into two interfaces then. –  Botz3000 Jul 17 '12 at 12:54

This isnt the way generic work in C#. A generic of IProvider<FileContent> is not a subtype of IProvider<IContent>.

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not a subtype... but a supertype i supposed? –  user1531730 Jul 17 '12 at 12:35
    
@user1531730 sorry wrong way round ive corrected this –  Luke McGregor Jul 17 '12 at 12:37

You wrote

Provider p = new Provider(); //works
IProvider<FileContent> pp = p as IProvider<FileContent>; //also works
IProvider<IContent> ppp = pp as IProvider<IContent>; //fails :(

Let us assume that all three of these work. Then it would be possible to write the following:

ppp.addContent(new NonFileContent());

where NonFileContent is a class that implements IContent, but is not derived from FileContent.

Now, imagine what happens in the following call:

FileContent fc = pp.getContent(0);

The object that was just added is supposed to be returned. However, it's a NonFileContent instance, not a FileContent instance. Therefore, returning this object from a method whose return value has to be a FileContent instance is impossible, which is why the compiler does not consider pp and ppp assignment-compatible in the first place.

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ok, i think begin to understand why it is not working. But refered to the link Botz3000 posted, it should be possible if i remove the void addContent(T content); Method from the interface - but that also does not work. –  user1531730 Jul 17 '12 at 12:50

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