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I have a Class A which I intend to put in a shared library as it interacts with the device drivers.

I have a Class B and may be C,D,E... in future which will use the class A using the shared library.

I want a capability of setting a callback function in Class A so that when a specific event occurs a non-static members function of class B,C,D,E ... should be called by Class A.

I searched on google for callback function in C++ but found that non-static member functions are not supported by C-style definition of callbacks.

Can it be done using function pointers ?

Kindly give some suggestions for callbacks in C++ which do not violate the OOPS concepts.

I also came around a library called 'Boost' which offers similar functionality but I want to avoid the overhead of the extra library if possible. Is Boost recommended for callback function ?

EDIT : The B,C,D,E will not share any hierarchy and they will be completely independent classes. But all of them would have object of class A. And class A would also have a public function to set the callback function.

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A non-static member function has to be called upon a concrete object of class B, C, .... Not sure what you are after. If I understand correctly, your system interact with object of class A without knowledge of class B, C, D. Then it is impossible to have A call a non-static member of B, etc unless either B derived from A, and the system interact with a B class object through A pointer, by virtual functions or CRTP; Or A has a B class sub object. Either way, your system has to know a B class concrete object to call its non-static member –  Yan Zhou Jul 17 '12 at 12:34
    
The class A will provide a mechanism (public function) to set the callback function. And class B,C,... will also have a object of class A. So, after the class B,C,.. has set the function and after a particular event is detected by class A, the class A should be able to call the function set by B,C,... –  Harsh Shah Jul 17 '12 at 12:49
    
I think it is impossible. If {B, C, ...} does not share some hierarchy, for example, all derived from A, how could A know which type of the object the callback shall be called upon? You can pass member function pointers to A, but A need to know the type B to call it. If A has B or C, etc, then it will be possible. But it is not the case in your question. –  Yan Zhou Jul 17 '12 at 13:06
    
@Yan Zhou : Is it possible using Boost library ? –  Harsh Shah Jul 18 '12 at 7:19
    
Boost cannot do what C++ cannot do. The only way I can think about is similar to @Xeo answer. But I won't recommend it because when you cast something to void *, all type information are lost. If you make slight mistakes in implementations in {B, C, ...}, which is entirely possible if there are a lot of them, then the worst though not uncommon case is that the code will compile, and run, without any crash, but not produce what you want. –  Yan Zhou Jul 18 '12 at 8:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

One option, if you really really want to avoid the nearly unimportant overhead of a polymorphic function wrapper, is to make those functions static and have them take a "user data" void* parameter, pointing to an appropriate instance of the class the function is a member of. Inside the static function, you then cast back to the appropriate type:

#include <iostream>

struct A{
  typedef void (*callback_type)(void*, int);
  callback_type callback;
  void* user_data;
  void set_callback(callback_type cb, void* ud){
     callback = cb; user_data = ud;
  }
  void invoke(){ callback(user_data, 42); }
};

struct B{
  static void cb_foo(void* vself, int data){
    B* self = static_cast<B*>(vself);
    self->foo(data);
  }
  void foo(int data){ std::cout << data * 2 << "\n"; }
};

struct C{
  static void cb_bar(void* vself, int data){
    C* self = static_cast<C*>(vself);
    self->bar(data);
  }
  void bar(int data){ std::cout << data / 2 << "\n"; }
};

int main(){
  A a;
  B b;
  a.set_callback(&B::cb_foo, &b);
  a.invoke();
  C c;
  a.set_callback(&C::cb_bar, &c);
  a.invoke();
}

Live example on Ideone.

I personally would recommend using std::function, though, since the above is severly limited in what can be accepted as a callback. std::function is a polymorphic function wrapper, meaning that it can take normal function pointers, member function pointers and even functors (function objects) and invoke them all in the same manner. Together with std::bind, which allows you to bind parameters to a function, you can make easy callbacks to member functions. Boost offers them too (Boost.Function, Boost.Bind).

#include <iostream>
#include <functional> // C++11
//#include <boost/function.hpp>
//#include <boost/bind.hpp>

struct A{
  std::function<void(int)> callback;
  void invoke(){ callback(42); }
};

struct B{
  void foo(int data){ std::cout << data * 2 << "\n"; }
};

struct C{
  void bar(int data){ std::cout << data / 2 << "\n"; }
};

int main(){
  using namespace std::placeholders; // namespace for argument placeholders for std::bind
                                     // not needed for Boost.Bind
  A a;
  B b;
  a.callback = std::bind(&B::foo, &b, _1);
  a.invoke();
  C c;
  a.callback = std::bind(&C::bar, &c, _1);
  a.invoke();
};

Live example on Ideone.

Basically std::bind does automatically what you had to do manually in the first version, it saves the object pointer and invokes the member function on it. It doesn't do this through a void* pointer, however, and instead std::bind returns a different binder type for every different object pointer. That's why you need std::function, since it doesn't care what you pass it.

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I implemented my functionality using your first approach mentioned and it served my purpose. I made some changes as I had to write this in a class and not struct. Thanks ! :) –  Harsh Shah Jul 18 '12 at 8:02

Assuming that {B, C, D, E} share some hierarchy so you do not need to write a new version for each class, make the callback function static but add an additional parameter that is a reference to the {B, C, D, E} instance that is involved in the callback. That way, once you are within the context of the function, you will be able to invoke nonstatic functions/operations on the relevant object.

If the class hierarchies for {B, C, D, E} or anything that comes up in the future are not the same and you cannot find a common starting point, you will probably need to resort to something more generic like a void pointer, though that makes it very difficult to know what functionality can be invoked on the object.

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You need to make that extra parameter a void* pointer, else you need 4 different callback function pointer in A. –  Xeo Jul 17 '12 at 12:37
    
I was assuming that there was some kind of hierarchy involved for {B, C, D, E}, but I will add that assumption to my answer. –  Omaha Jul 17 '12 at 12:37
    
The B,C,D,E will not share any hierarchy and they will be completely independent classes. But all of them would have object of class A. And class A would also have a public function to set the callback function. –  Harsh Shah Jul 17 '12 at 12:46

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