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With MVVM I always see these both methods for properties:

    private int myProperty;
    public int MyProperty
    {
        get { return myProperty; }
        set
        {
            myProperty = value;
            NotifyPropertyChanged("MyProperty");
        }
    }

and

    private int myProperty;
    public int MyProperty
    {
        get { return myProperty; }
        set
        {
            myProperty = value;
            NotifyPropertyChanged(m => m.MyProperty);
        }
    }

The first one use an hardcoded string to NotifyPropertyChanged and the second one use a lambda expression to NotifyPropertyChanged. I don't want to create a debate to ask what is the better solution but I would like to understand what are the differences bewteeen these two solution. What are the consequences of using one or the other?

Correct me if I'm wrong but the lambda expression solution should use more memory and should be slower than the hardcoded string because the NotifyPropertyChanged method of the base class use delegate and reflection. But the hardcoded string solution may create stupid bug because it's a string and nothing to tell me I correctly wrote it.

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1  
Yes you are right: the lamda version is slower but safer while the string version is fast but unsafe. What is your question? –  nemesv Jul 17 '12 at 12:35
    
This has already been asked? stackoverflow.com/q/141370/81053 Or at least worth reading the top answer –  Chris Moutray Jul 17 '12 at 12:40
    
@nemesv That is my question. I'm interested to know what are the other differencies between these two solutions. Just to really well understand the code. How much is the second method slower? –  B413 Jul 17 '12 at 12:42
    
You will never, EVER, find yourself excising lambdas from your application in order to reduce its memory footprint. –  Will Jul 17 '12 at 14:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The second expression would either generate a compiler error on the property name change, or would automatically change with it (via the Rename support in VS or ReSharper).

So basically, you gain compiler support for property names. The wrong name provided to the notify would mean that data-binding would break. With string names, this breakage would be silent.

In a small UI the choice is irrelevant in my opinion, but in a large application with a heavy UI layer the extra support against bugs can pay itself off in the long run.

Performance won't be problematically slower, don't forget, binding is reflection-powered anyway. Performance, as always, is relative. The hard-coded version will technically be faster because it doesn't need to reflect the property name out of the meta-data. How much faster, I'm not sure.

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Of course, one should not forget that there is the other side to property binding - XAML, and so the second option does not ensure total compile time safety. –  clearpath Jul 17 '12 at 13:06
1  
@user676571 No, but with the XAML you are expecting it, a property notify might be less obvious to spot. –  Adam Houldsworth Jul 17 '12 at 13:12

Rather than repeating that code of NotifyPropertyChanged for every property, I felt the below code is more cleaner

Create a Set method in your ViewModel Base

protected bool Set<T>(Expression<Func<T>> selectorExpression, ref T field, T value)
{
    if (EqualityComparer<T>.Default.Equals(field, value))
       return false;
    field = value;
    RaisePropertyChanged(selectorExpression);
    return true;
}

and use them as

string title;
public string Title
{
   get { return title; }
   set { Set(() => Title, ref title, value); }
}
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How do you use it later? –  clearpath Jul 17 '12 at 13:06
    
What is the return value used for? –  clearpath Jul 17 '12 at 13:15
    
Use it, If you want to know whether the operation has changed the underlying private variable –  Moble Joseph Jul 17 '12 at 13:17
    
Wow, its almost as if you're re-implementing the DependencyObject framework upon which WPF is built. Wait, you are. –  Will Jul 17 '12 at 14:17
    
@Will I didn't get you. I am fairly new to WPF, so it would be great if you could give me more details on that. –  Moble Joseph Jul 17 '12 at 14:32

I use the following method in a base class implementing INotifyPropertyChanged and it is so easy and convenient:

public void NotifyPropertyChanged()
    {
        StackTrace stackTrace = new StackTrace();

        MethodBase method = stackTrace.GetFrame(1).GetMethod();

        if (!(method.Name.StartsWith("get_") || method.Name.StartsWith("set_")))
        {
            throw new InvalidOperationException("The NotifyPropertyChanged() method can only be used from inside a property");
        }

        string propertyName = method.Name.Substring(4);

        RaisePropertyChanged(propertyName);
    }
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