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Is there a way using SQL to list all foreign keys for a given table? I know the table name / schema and I can plug that in.

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I suggest to use @Magnus' answer. Simplest, cleanest, fastest. –  Erwin Brandstetter Oct 10 '13 at 15:04

13 Answers 13

up vote 81 down vote accepted

You can do this via the information_schema tables. For example:

SELECT
    tc.constraint_name, tc.table_name, kcu.column_name, 
    ccu.table_name AS foreign_table_name,
    ccu.column_name AS foreign_column_name 
FROM 
    information_schema.table_constraints AS tc 
    JOIN information_schema.key_column_usage AS kcu
      ON tc.constraint_name = kcu.constraint_name
    JOIN information_schema.constraint_column_usage AS ccu
      ON ccu.constraint_name = tc.constraint_name
WHERE constraint_type = 'FOREIGN KEY' AND tc.table_name='mytable';
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5  
table_name='mytable' should be tc.table_name='mytable' or else it throws an ambiguous error –  intrepion Jul 15 '11 at 23:50
6  
+1, very helpful. To make the query more robust it should probably join on constraint_schema as well, since it's possible for two schemas to have constraints with the same name. Something like: FROM information_schema.table_constraints AS tc JOIN information_schema.key_column_usage AS kcu USING (constraint_schema, constraint_name) JOIN information_schema.constraint_column_usage AS ccu USING (constraint_schema, constraint_name) –  EMP Aug 26 '11 at 6:41
1  
This breaks when there are several columns in a constraint, doesn't it? There seems to be no proper way to associate pk columns with fk columns using information_schema BTW. –  fionbio Jun 1 '12 at 18:54
    
It indeed breaks with more than one column in constraint. For Postgres, there is a way of getting this information from the pg_catalog schema. See my answer below. –  martin Jun 8 '12 at 14:07

psql does this, and if you start psql with:

psql -E

it will show you exactly what query is executed. In the case of finding foreign keys, it's:

SELECT conname,
  pg_catalog.pg_get_constraintdef(r.oid, true) as condef
FROM pg_catalog.pg_constraint r
WHERE r.conrelid = '16485' AND r.contype = 'f' ORDER BY 1

In this case, 16485 is the oid of the table I'm looking at - you can get that one by just casting your tablename to regclass like:

WHERE r.conrelid = 'mytable'::regclass

Schema-qualify the table name if it's not unique (or the first in your search_path):

WHERE r.conrelid = 'myschema.mytable'::regclass
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This is very handy! Postgres seems to have a million little functions like this that make everything simpler. Now how to remember them? –  Phil Feb 6 '14 at 22:22
1  
@Phil: You only need a general idea. Let the manual remember the rest. –  Erwin Brandstetter Feb 7 '14 at 13:42
    
Don't use ORDER BY 1: stackoverflow.com/a/2328158/14731 :) –  Gili Sep 19 '14 at 0:06

Ollyc's answer is good as it is not Postgres-specific, however, it breaks down when the foreign key references more than one column. The following query works for arbitrary number of columns but it relies heavily on Postgres extensions:

select 
    att2.attname as "child_column", 
    cl.relname as "parent_table", 
    att.attname as "parent_column"
from
   (select 
        unnest(con1.conkey) as "parent", 
        unnest(con1.confkey) as "child", 
        con1.confrelid, 
        con1.conrelid
    from 
        pg_class cl
        join pg_namespace ns on cl.relnamespace = ns.oid
        join pg_constraint con1 on con1.conrelid = cl.oid
    where
        cl.relname = 'child_table'
        and ns.nspname = 'child_schema'
        and con1.contype = 'f'
   ) con
   join pg_attribute att on
       att.attrelid = con.confrelid and att.attnum = con.child
   join pg_class cl on
       cl.oid = con.confrelid
   join pg_attribute att2 on
       att2.attrelid = con.conrelid and att2.attnum = con.parent
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before 8.4 the function unnest has to be created at first. wiki.postgresql.org/wiki/Array_Unnest –  maletin Oct 4 '12 at 8:12
    
Where does one insert the table name into this query? Entered verbatim the above returns 0 rows on my PSQL DB that has tens of foreign keys. –  Phrogz Mar 10 '13 at 16:33
3  
You replace 'child_table' and 'child_schema' with the names of the table and its schema –  martin Apr 9 '13 at 10:47

Extension to ollyc recipe :

CREATE VIEW foreign_keys_view AS
SELECT
    tc.table_name, kcu.column_name,
    ccu.table_name AS foreign_table_name,
    ccu.column_name AS foreign_column_name
FROM
    information_schema.table_constraints AS tc
    JOIN information_schema.key_column_usage 
        AS kcu ON tc.constraint_name = kcu.constraint_name
    JOIN information_schema.constraint_column_usage 
        AS ccu ON ccu.constraint_name = tc.constraint_name
WHERE constraint_type = 'FOREIGN KEY';

Then:

SELECT * FROM foreign_keys_view WHERE table_name='YourTableNameHere';

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excellent idea! –  Rafael Ruiz Tabares Mar 15 '14 at 12:05

You can use the PostgreSQL system catalogs. Maybe you can query pg_constraint to ask for foreign keys. You can also use the Information Schema

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This query works correct with composite keys also:

select c.constraint_name
    , x.table_schema as schema_name
    , x.table_name
    , x.column_name
    , y.table_schema as foreign_schema_name
    , y.table_name as foreign_table_name
    , y.column_name as foreign_column_name
from information_schema.referential_constraints c
join information_schema.key_column_usage x
    on x.constraint_name = c.constraint_name
join information_schema.key_column_usage y
    on y.ordinal_position = x.position_in_unique_constraint
    and y.constraint_name = c.unique_constraint_name
order by c.constraint_name, x.ordinal_position
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2  
You're joining the columns on "constraint_name", so this will only work if all of your constraint names are unique (across all tables in all schemas). This is not usually a requirement, and thus not enforced by the database. –  Zilk Sep 11 '13 at 17:33

Use the name of the Primary Key to which the Keys are referencing and query the information_schema:

select table_name, column_name
from information_schema.key_column_usage
where constraint_name IN (select constraint_name
  from information_schema.referential_constraints 
  where unique_constraint_name = 'TABLE_NAME_pkey')

Here 'TABLE_NAME_pkey' is the name of the Primary Key referenced by the Foreign Keys.

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SELECT r.conname
      ,ct.table_name
      ,pg_catalog.pg_get_constraintdef(r.oid, true) as condef
  FROM pg_catalog.pg_constraint r, information_schema.constraint_table_usage ct
 WHERE r.contype = 'f' 
   AND r.conname = ct.constraint_name
 ORDER BY 1
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I think what you were looking for and very close to what @ollyc wrote is this:

SELECT
tc.constraint_name, tc.table_name, tc.constraint_name, kcu.column_name, 
ccu.table_name AS foreign_table_name,
ccu.column_name AS foreign_column_name 
FROM 
information_schema.table_constraints AS tc 
JOIN information_schema.key_column_usage AS kcu
  ON tc.constraint_name = kcu.constraint_name
JOIN information_schema.constraint_column_usage AS ccu
  ON ccu.constraint_name = tc.constraint_name
WHERE constraint_type = 'FOREIGN KEY' AND ccu.table_name='YourTableNameHere';

This will list all the tables that use your specified table as a foreign key

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I wrote a solution that like and use frequently. The code is at http://code.google.com/p/pgutils/. See the pgutils.foreign_keys view.

Unfortunately, the output is too wordy to include here. However, you can try it on a public version of the database here, like this:

$ psql -h unison-db.org -U PUBLIC -d unison -c 'select * from pgutils.foreign_keys;

This works with 8.3 at least. I anticipate updating it, if needed, in the next few months.

-Reece

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1  
Project link is now dead. –  pimlottc Sep 9 '14 at 0:53
    
@pimlottc: Moved to bitbucket.org/reece/pgutils. Thanks for pointing this out. –  Reece Sep 27 '14 at 23:59

check the ff post for your solution and don't forget to mark this when you fine this helpful

http://errorbank.blogspot.com/2011/03/list-all-foreign-keys-references-for.html

SELECT
  o.conname AS constraint_name,
  (SELECT nspname FROM pg_namespace WHERE oid=m.relnamespace) AS source_schema,
  m.relname AS source_table,
  (SELECT a.attname FROM pg_attribute a WHERE a.attrelid = m.oid AND a.attnum = o.conkey[1] AND a.attisdropped = false) AS source_column,
  (SELECT nspname FROM pg_namespace WHERE oid=f.relnamespace) AS target_schema,
  f.relname AS target_table,
  (SELECT a.attname FROM pg_attribute a WHERE a.attrelid = f.oid AND a.attnum = o.confkey[1] AND a.attisdropped = false) AS target_column
FROM
  pg_constraint o LEFT JOIN pg_class c ON c.oid = o.conrelid
  LEFT JOIN pg_class f ON f.oid = o.confrelid LEFT JOIN pg_class m ON m.oid = o.conrelid
WHERE
  o.contype = 'f' AND o.conrelid IN (SELECT oid FROM pg_class c WHERE c.relkind = 'r');
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Offers two SQLs that work on PostgreSQL 9.1 (once you correct the wrong escaping put your 'tablename' (without schema-prefix) into the SQL). –  alfonx Jun 14 '12 at 23:59
1  
+1 : this is the only solution that does not return duplicates. –  omatrot Nov 13 '12 at 7:33

I created little tool to query and then compare database schema: Dump PostgreSQL db schema to text

There is info about FK, but ollyc response gives more details.

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Here is a solution by Andreas Joseph Krogh from the PostgreSQL mailing list: http://www.postgresql.org/message-id/200811072134.44750.andreak@officenet.no

SELECT source_table::regclass, source_attr.attname AS source_column,
    target_table::regclass, target_attr.attname AS target_column
FROM pg_attribute target_attr, pg_attribute source_attr,
  (SELECT source_table, target_table, source_constraints[i] source_constraints, target_constraints[i] AS target_constraints
   FROM
     (SELECT conrelid as source_table, confrelid AS target_table, conkey AS source_constraints, confkey AS target_constraints,
       generate_series(1, array_upper(conkey, 1)) AS i
      FROM pg_constraint
      WHERE contype = 'f'
     ) query1
  ) query2
WHERE target_attr.attnum = target_constraints AND target_attr.attrelid = target_table AND
      source_attr.attnum = source_constraints AND source_attr.attrelid = source_table;

This solution handles foreign keys that reference multiple columns, and avoids duplicates (which some of the other answers fail to do). The only thing I changed were the variable names.

Here is an example that returns all employee columns that reference the permission table:

SELECT source_column
FROM foreign_keys
WHERE source_table = 'employee'::regclass AND target_table = 'permission'::regclass;
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