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Hey guys and girls :)

I've been battling this problem for a few hours and I thought I'd rather ask you for help than hammering my face into my desk repeatedly.

Need:

I have a series of editable lists which, on a press of a button should be transformed into some sort of data structure. When it has been turned into some sort of data I need to add duplicates together.

example:

  • 200g banana
  • 100g apple
  • 200g apple

Should be turned into a data list of some sort and should in the end look like this:

  • 200g banana
  • 300g apple

Hey I just met you, and this is crazy, but here's my code, so help me maybe?

//button click event
$(".calculate").bind("click", function(e)
{
    //get the correct parent of the button
    var parent = $(this).closest("#calc");

    //get relevant data
    parent.find(".options").each(function(index, element)
    {
        var opt1 = $(this).children(".opt1").children("input").val(); //weight
        var opt2 = $(this).children(".opt2").children("input").val(); //ingredient
    });
});

Basically I click the button and the above script finds all the relevant data. I cannot however for the life of me turn this into a multidimensional array or a list of objects I can search for duplicates in.

When I try to make a dynamic object it seems to fail and when I make a multidimensional array to search in I get blocked by inArray's inability to search through them.

Problem recap: I am able to get the user data no problem. Turning it into a list and adding together duplicates is the problem.

share|improve this question
    
Could you put it on JSFiddle.net for us? –  Some Guy Jul 17 '12 at 12:50
    
Can you show a sample of your html too, so we can get a better idea of what's going on. Preferably, put together a simple jsfiddle.net to illustrate the problem. –  Jamiec Jul 17 '12 at 12:51
    
The closest("#calc"); implies duplicate IDs used, say its not true. –  Mark Schultheiss Jul 17 '12 at 13:37
    
Don't worry Mark, it is only there until I clean up the code and add a class instead. –  Eirinn Jul 17 '12 at 13:48
    
+1'ed just for the Carly Rae Jepsen reference. –  JoshMock Jul 17 '12 at 18:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I will suggest you to have a global object that will contain the summary, this will look like this:

$(".calculate").bind("click", function(e)
{
    var fruits = {};

    //get the correct parent of the button
    var parent = $(this).closest("#calc");

    //get relevant data
    parent.find(".options").each(function(index, element)
    {
        var opt1 = $(this).children(".opt1").children("input").val(); //weight
        var opt2 = $(this).children(".opt2").children("input").val(); //ingredient

        // here is my code
        if(fruits[opt2] == undefined) {
            fruits[opt2] = opt1;
        } else {
            // assuming that opt1 is an integer
            fruits[opt2] += opt1;
        }
    });

    // use fruits variable here
});
share|improve this answer
    
You should be careful about where you declare the resulting object. If you set it as a global, on every click the quantities will add up. You should at least reset the variable in the handler. –  Alex Ciminian Jul 17 '12 at 13:02
    
This seem to work for making the data list! But there is no check to see if an element is already in the list, and if it is, add them together. –  Eirinn Jul 17 '12 at 13:20
    
look at else statement, there is a += operator –  haynar Jul 17 '12 at 13:21
1  
Ah..on second run the value is NaN - must be a bug on my side, thank you for the help! –  Eirinn Jul 17 '12 at 13:36
1  
@haynar, you're right about SO, but variable scope is not obvious to JavaScript beginners. Your answer is as good as mine, minus the variable initialization issue. If you edit your answer and fix that, I'll remove the downvote. Cheers! :) –  Alex Ciminian Jul 17 '12 at 15:46

Here's another variant, which also does some simple parsing in case you have 100g as input, versus 100. Also, the data structure gets reinitialized every time, so everything does not get doubled on every click.

$(".calculate").bind("click", function(e)
{
    //get the correct parent of the button
    var parent = $(this).closest("#calc");

    var ingredients = {};

    var extractWeight = function (input) {
        // you can add other logic here
        // to parse stuff like "1kg" or "3mg"

        // this assumes that everything is
        // in grams and returns just the numeric
        // value
        return parseInt(input.substring(0, input.length - 1));
    }

    //get relevant data
    parent.find(".options").each(function(index, element)
    {
        var opt1 = $(this).children(".opt1").children("input").val(); //weight
        var opt2 = $(this).children(".opt2").children("input").val(); //ingredient

        // initialize to 0 if not already initialized
        ingredients[opt2] = ingredients[opt2] ? ingredients[opt2] : 0;
        ingredients[opt2] += extractWeight(opt1);
    });
});​

Here are some tips:

  • {} is called an object literal and is used to create a new empty object
  • object members can be accessed dynamically through the [] notation (i.e. if x === "name" then o[x] === o.name)
  • variables are visible inside functions that are at the same level or deeper in the scope - like in my example I use ingredients in the each function.
  • arrays in JavaScript only support numeric keys, so you won't have stuff like PHP's "associative arrays". Objects fill this gap in JS.
share|improve this answer
1  
Thank you for the help, harynar's answer was closest at helping me with my problem, but your explanation was also very helpful. Unfortunately I cannot mark two as Answers so I'll rate yours up and thank you instead :) –  Eirinn Jul 17 '12 at 13:42
    
You're welcome. :) –  Alex Ciminian Jul 17 '12 at 15:16

Here is a jsFiddle that does what you're looking for :) http://jsfiddle.net/LD9TY/

It has two inputs, one for the item name and the other for the amount. When you click add, it checks an object to see if the item was already added. If so, it increments the amount for that item based on your input. If not, it adds that item with the amount you specified. It then goes and builds a ul with all the items in your "store".

Note that this is a quick and dirty example, so there is no type checking or validation going on :)

share|improve this answer
    
It is a very nice Fiddle Jason; However it does not solve the actual problem of creating and sorting through a data list. I appreciate the answer though and someone else is very likely to find use of your example! :) –  Eirinn Jul 17 '12 at 13:25

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